The Complete Guide to iPhone Car Integration | iLounge Article

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The Complete Guide to iPhone Car Integration

Though we’ve reviewed hundreds of iPhone-compatible accessories since last June, there has not been a complete, turnkey solution for in-car iPhone integration that average users can go out and purchase with ease. The reason is simple: though the iPhone is supposed to be Apple’s “best iPod ever,” it actually doesn’t work properly with many of the iPod’s best previous car accessories, and the iPhone accessory development process has proved unusually difficult for even the best engineers out there.

Today, the major problem is that there’s no single accessory that charges, mounts, and performs all audio from an iPhone, so unless you want to hand-hold your iPhone while you drive—which is against the law in many places—you can’t just connect one cable and expect to safely use both its music and phone features. This is largely due to Apple-imposed software limitations, but also certain technical hurdles developers need to overcome. So for now, in-car use of an iPhone requires a number of different parts, and we’ve created this Complete Guide to iPhone Car Integration to help you choose the ones that are best for your vehicle and personal needs.

The Budget Solution

 

What’s the least expensive way to integrate your iPhone into your car? Unless you’ve recently purchased a new car, it’s this one: the Budget Solution combination of an iPhone mount, a single cable that charges the iPhone and broadcasts its music to your FM radio, and a wired headset. This solution will cost you as little as $90—less if you shop aggressively—but can run up to $325 depending on the parts you select.

 

Let’s start with the car mount. Though you can conceivably toss the iPhone into your lap or a cupholder and skip this part entirely, we’ve found that having the iPhone’s touchscreen handy for dialing and music navigation is a must for safe in-car use. The mount shown here is the best we’ve tested to date, ProClip’s Padded Holder with Tilt Swivel for iPhone, which sells for $65 including the cost of the iPhone holder and a mount that’s made to fit your specific make, model, and year of car. This mount adjusts to your preferred angle, and can even be tilted to let your passenger control the phone or use Cover Flow mode. But many companies offer cheap mounts that use suction cups, vent mounts, or other inexpensive ways to attach your iPhone to your windshield or dashboard; some may not be legal where you live. Our accessory guide includes other iPhone and device-agnostic Car Mount options; one of the cheapest we’ve seen is Griffin’s iSqueez, which sells for $10, and is about to be updated with a new version.

 

Next, there’s the Car Charger, which is sold with or without an integrated FM Transmitter. This part is necessary to keep your iPhone’s battery juiced up on the road, and enable you to hear its audio through most car stereos. The FM transmitter broadcasts whatever music is playing on the iPhone onto a radio station of your choice, but again, it doesn’t do anything with phone call audio.

(If you’re lucky enough to have a car with a line-in/aux-in port on its stereo, you can skip the integrated FM transmitter portion and go with a simple $20 iPhone charger such as XtremeMac’s InCharge Auto or Griffin’s PowerJolt for iPod and iPhone (shown). You’ll also need to connect a $10-20 iPhone-to-car audio cable such as Belkin’s Mini-Stereo Link Cable or Monster’s iCable for Car (iPod/iPhone) to the iPhone’s headphone port for audio, then adjust the volume on both the iPhone and your car.)

So far, there are only two FM transmitter and charger combinations we know to be really iPhone-ready. Belkin’s new version of TuneCast Auto (shown) is set to be the first official “Works With iPhone” FM transmitter and car charger, and sells for $80. For the same price, Griffin’s iTrip Auto with SmartScan (shown) currently lacks the Works With iPhone certification, but still works with the iPhone anyway; a fully iPhone-shielded version is forthcoming early this year. Worth noting: though Apple’s iPhone certification program tries to prevent cell phone interference from junking up connected accessories, it can’t stop the same interference from leaking into your car’s stereo and speaker systems, so you may notice beeps mid-music no matter what you buy. That said, these cables, and others that are Works With iPhone certified, will do better than most at shielding out those noises.

 

The final piece in our budget solution is a wired iPhone headset. This is the least expensive way to take phone calls without holding the phone up to your head, or using speakerphone mode, which has its own issues. We call it a budget item because Apple includes one for free with every iPhone, called the iPhone Stereo Headset (shown) and sells replacements for $29, but there are now iPhone-specific options ranging up to $179, all reviewed here, notably including V-Moda’s Vibe Duo (shown).

The Obvious Solution

 

The next solution we look at here is called “Obvious” because it’s not the cheapest around, but is extremely common for users of Bluetooth cell phones such as the iPhone. It offers one advantage over the Budget Solution: phone calls come directly into your wireless earpiece without forcing you to keep a wire dangling down to the iPhone’s headphone port. But it also has two consequences: you really need to keep your Bluetooth headset and the iPhone charged.

 

We’ve reviewed a number of Bluetooth headsets for the iPhone over the last six months, including the $100 Plantronics Voyager 520 and $150 Discovery 665 shown here. They both do well both indoors and outdoors, though a noise-filtering headset such as Aliph’s Jawbone will sound the best to your callers if you’re in noisy environments such as a sportscar or older, less noise-dampened vehicle. Many other headsets we’ve reviewed can be found here.

Pairing a Bluetooth headset with your iPhone is relatively easy. You go into the Settings menu, pick General, then pick Bluetooth. Turn Bluetooth on, then follow the instructions that come with your headset to initiate Bluetooth pairing mode. The iPhone will generally discover the device instantly at that point, and require you to enter a PIN number found in the headset’s manual. Once that’s done, the devices are paired. If you’ve purchased a Bluetooth 2.0 headset, the iPhone will typically find it immediately when you turn both the headset and iPhone Bluetooth feature on; otherwise you may need to press a button on the headset to let the iPhone know it’s there. But both devices will drain battery power more quickly when Bluetooth is on and being used for calls, so look for a headset with a convenient included charger, and make sure whatever iPhone charger you’re using is guaranteed to fully power the iPhone when Bluetooth and phone features are being used. The picks we’ve mentioned above feature that guarantee; other chargers do not.

The Tape Deck Solution

 

The Tape Deck Solution is different from the Obvious Solution in two ways: your iPod is connecting to an in-car tape deck rather than the FM radio, and so you need to supply a cable and/or adapter that will work with the iPhone. This unwieldy connection of parts requires the most work to assemble, but will sound better than an FM transmitter cable in your car when you’re listening to music from your iPhone, and will still enable you to charge the iPhone and take calls wirelessly from a Bluetooth headset. The total cost of the tape adapter and iPhone adapter cable will be under $25.

Our top-rated adapters, Philips’ PH2050W, and Sony’s CPA-9C still sell for under $15 and are the best around, but neither has an iPhone-compatible headphone port plug. Monster’s iCarPlay Cassette Adapter has the right plug, but doesn’t sound as good. So you’ll need a headphone port adapter: we’d recommend ifrogz’ Fitz, which sells for $8.

The Optimal Solution

 

The biggest problem with the solutions above? They require you to connect a lot of cables and create a mess in the process. That’s why we’re excited about the Optimal Solution, which is cleaner, simpler, and offers the best phone calling experience, too. It replaces the Bluetooth and wired headset options with a relatively new type of car accessory that mounts on your car’s visor. And it uses a single bottom connection to charge the iPhone and output its music to your car stereo. The only issue? This solution can be expensive.

 

For the Optimal Solution, you’ll need the Bluetrek/Contour Design SurfaceSound Compact, which adds a Bluetooth 2.0-enabled microphone and flat panel NXT speaker combination to your car visor. Contour plans to sell it for $100, but stores are already showing a street price for the SurfaceSound Compact through Bluetrek of $65. In our testing, the system does a superb job of automatically connecting to the iPhone when both are turned on, screening out in-car noise while you’re driving, and enabling both you and your passenger to hear and talk with callers. Pairing works just like the Bluetooth headset instructions above, and SurfaceSound Compact runs for 15 hours of talk time—21 days on standby. It comes with a car charger and cable to let you recharge the battery when you’re on the go. Using SurfaceSound Compact makes the calling part of using an iPhone substantially better in your vehicle.

Final Thoughts

As “optimal” as the solution above may be, it’s not “ideal”—we’re still waiting for end-to-end, single-connection accessories that will enable most iPhone users to enjoy music, telephone calls, and charging without having to cobble together parts. For that to happen, Apple will need to give iPhone the power to wirelessly stream both phone calls and music through Bluetooth, or handle phone calls through its Dock Connector, or both. Until then, iPhone car integration will require most users to purchase each of the parts we’ve mentioned above separately, choosing the ones that are best-suited to their existing cars’ needs. We’re continuing to watch for better iPhone mounting, charging, and audio options, and of course, you’ll see them on iLounge as soon as they arrive.

Postscript: Closed Comments

On January 30, 2008, we closed all comments to this article based on repeated attempts at advertising, and posts of misleading information that will confuse readers. We re-emphasize here that—unfortunately—“iPod-compatible” car kits do not necessarily provide proper charging or AV connectivity for iPhones, and that Apple firmware changes have created tremendous uncertainty as to whether a given iPod accessory will or will not fully work with the iPhone at a certain point in time. Additionally, as noted on all of our comment pages, we expressly prohibit advertising in our comments.

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Comments

1

will there every be a way to have voice activated dialing on the iphone? without buttons to feel, and without voice activation, the iphone is problematic in the car.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 28, 2008 at 3:46 PM (CST)

1

Nice article.  However, you didn’t cover the fact that the iPod and iPhone lack a line-out connection.  If you have a newer car or stereo, chances are that you have a line-in jack, but the iPod or iPhone will sound much better if you use a line-out rather than the headphone jack.  Is there a good solution for line-out and audio for the iPhone?  The SiK seems OK but I’m uncertain whether it will work with the iPhone.  Same for the Sendstation.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 28, 2008 at 3:58 PM (CST)

1

khf525: Apple would have to enable the feature or permit a third-party to develop an application with it.

Greg: Both the iPod and iPhone have line-out capabilities, however, they both depend on accessories to convert the Dock Connector’s pins into an aux/line cable-friendly port. Unfortunately, no accessory currently exists that simultaneously enables line-out functionality and properly charges the iPhone with its required voltage. Plenty do this for the iPod, so Belkin and other companies are working on iPhone-ready versions of those products, as well as new ones.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 28, 2008 at 3:58 PM (CST)

1

My brother recently bought a Ford Explorer with the Sync system.  He does not have an iPhone.  He has the LG Voyager - couldn’t talk him out of it! - but he says it works great by bluetooth connection for that phone.  Has anyone used the iPhone with this system?  If it works as seemlessly as his does with the Voyager it might actually be a reason to consider a Ford car (otherwise why would you want one!)

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 28, 2008 at 4:27 PM (CST)

1

Jeremy: the SendStation PocketDock Line Out USB claims to be compatible with the iPhone, though they do not participate in the Apple iPhone certification.  If it is indeed compatible, you could combine this with a USB A-B cable and a USB 12V adaptor, and you would have the charger and line-out.  It’s a kludge but it should work.  The SiK imp may work but it’s hard to tell.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 28, 2008 at 4:40 PM (CST)

1

I’ve been using a Peripheral iPod Interface in my 2004 Scion xB, first with my classic iPods, then with my iPhone. It’s not certified, but I’ve never had any interference problems. I simply have to dismiss the “This device isn’t compatible…” message every time I connect.

The device provides line out sound directly to my factory stereo, allows me to change tracks using the dash controls and seems to charge my iPhone just fine. Since I plug it in almost every time I’m in the car, I rarely have to worry about my phone’s battery running down.

They’re sold through Crutchfield <http://www.crutchfield.com/App/Product/Item/Main.aspx?g=305250&i=541ISAS71&tp=1126>, but I found my much cheaper on eBay. Did the installation myself and it took about half an hour.

Kind of surprised iLounge has never reviewed one.

I use a Bluetooth headset for calls, but am considering the Blutrek handsfree unit after this review.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 10:51 AM (CST)

1

“Unfortunately, no accessory currently exists that simultaneously enables line-out functionality and properly charges the iPhone with its required voltage.”

The dock that comes with the iPhone has a line-out jack.

My only problem with using that is I have a case so my iPhone won’t fit in the dock anymore. :(

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 12:58 PM (CST)

1

emax: The big issue is the “seems to charge” part. It turns out that properly charging the iPhone when its wireless features are activated requires more juice than most of the old iPod chargers put out. The iPhone has no user-viewable voltage meter to let you determine whether or not it’s getting enough juice.

Greg, paavopetie: Various dock accessories (including Apple’s) may perform the conversion but they don’t include the car charging component. You can try to connect your iPhone Dock to one of the Griffin or XtremeMac chargers and see how it works for you.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 2:41 PM (CST)

1

I’ve been using a Usa•spec ipod interface for about a year now - connects to the head unit via the changer port and controls the iPhone (airport mode dialog appears) via the head unit buttons. Sound quality is excellent, charging appears to be as fast as when connected to the mac. I use a Kensington windshield mount and a Bluetooth headset - when a call comes in, the iPhone fades the music and sends the call to the headset. Painless! Call finishes, music fades back in.

I bought it for a 5.5g ipod but usa•spec certify it as compatible with the iPhone. Cost about $90(ebay) plus 15 minutes install (2 power cables to splice)

No connection, just a satisfied user.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 3:35 PM (CST)

1

Addition to above post - it connects to the iPhone dock connector via a 6’ cable - very handy. It also has a stereo RCA input (switchable on the head unit) for other audio sources.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 4:14 PM (CST)

1

For all those w/ line-in on their stereos:


Just use Belkin’s Auto Kit for iPod
http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Product_Id=149006


Run a 1/8” mini-plug to your head and be done with it. You’ll still have to use bluetooth for call audio but at least you can make use of the superior line-out audio and charge up at the same time.
<br>
FYI: this thing has a little amp built in that you don’t want to overdrive your system with (it won’t blow anything up but it’ll sound a little muddy if you crank it too far)

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 4:26 PM (CST)

1

can you hack the onstar system to access that mic?

If so, let me know.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 5:53 PM (CST)

1

One other option I look at off and on is a headset with bluetooth—for example this Pioneer DEH-P7900BT. You guys have never gotten a review of the various car stereo iPod options (Blaupunkt, Pioneer, etc) which I’d live to see.
Most work via the dock connector.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 6:35 PM (CST)

1

I bought an Alpine CDE (9827…I think)to use with my ipod (controls ipod menu and playlists from stereo.) Worked GREAT! Then I bought an iphone because when I tested the stereo with my brothers iphone and it worked! (Alpine cable plugs into bottom jack of ipod/iphone.) BUT after the 1st iphone update it stopped working.
The other issue is that when you are playing music and a call comes in, if you take the line out of the headphone jack, you can’t hear the caller and vice versa. You would think apple would fix this asap! or at least let a 3rd party fix it. All they need is an adapter with a built in microphone from the headphone jack to the stereo…kind of like the stock headphones. When a call comes in, the music would fade down and you could take the call while driving. The voice over the car speakers and the microphone picking up your voice…is it really that difficult to create?

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 29, 2008 at 7:25 PM (CST)

1

I have an ‘08 Ford Focus with Microsoft SYNC integration. My iPhone works perfectly with it wrt iPod and Bluetooth phone functionality. SMS text functionality is not yet supported, but SYNC is user upgradeable, with new features due out this fall. It’ll be a free download from syncmyride.com. The new features, btw are automatic emergency dispatch calling (when airbags are deployed, with a 10 second window to verbally cancel the call and a prerecorded message played to the dispatcher, if you are unable to talk), and automatic maintenance reminders using feedback from the vehicle’s onboard computers.

I am really impressed with the voice recognition, which requires no voice training, is 99.9% accurate and after one month is hard to live without: “Play artist Dave Matthews,” “Call John Doe on cell,” “Play playlist Funky Mix,” or “Call Dad at home,” etc. Each time the iPhone connects to SYNC, SYNC’s iPod index and phonebook index are updated.

It took me about a week to use the system to it’s full potential, and to realize it’s a steal as a $395 option (standard in some Ford-Lincoln-Mercury models and trim levels). And everything, including the emergency dispatch and maintenance reminder upgrade this fall, is free; there’s no monthly subscription.
I am really impressed with the voice recognition, which requires no voice training, is 99.9% accurate and after one month is hard to live without: “Play artist Dave Matthews,” “Call John Doe on cell,” “Play playlist Funky Mix,” or “Call Dad at home,” etc. Each time the iPhone connects to SYNC, SYNC’s iPod index and phonebook index are updated.

It took me about a week to use the system to it’s full potential, and to realize it’s a steal as a $395 option (standard in some Ford-Lincoln-Mercury models and trim levels). And everything, including the emergency dispatch and maintenance reminder upgrade this fall, is free; there’s no monthly subscription.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 30, 2008 at 1:10 AM (CST)

1

The Pioneer AVIC-D3 is a iPod controlling, bluetooth phone working dual-din touchscreen head-unit that can replace your car stereo.  This one device works great with the iPod and handles both audio playback and phone functionality. 

Its not cheap, but its also a GPS unit too - so if money is not a problem, there is no better solution.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 30, 2008 at 1:24 AM (CST)

1

This article is poor, and misses the USA Spec device which works for music (but not calls), and PAC audio connection cables, which I have used in multiple Camaros, for instance.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 30, 2008 at 3:30 AM (CST)

1

Sorry, but this artikel is far from complete.
There are several cars that offer iPod and iPhone integration.
I have a VW Passat 06 with an iPod connector to the car stereo and a bluetooth adapter for the integrated car phone.
So my iPhone connects wired to the car stereo and via bluetooth for phoning.
I can answer calls by pushing the phone knob on the steering wheel.
Only downside is when i want to make a call i have to take the iPhone in my hand to dial.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 30, 2008 at 4:33 AM (CST)

1

Check out GROM Audio (http://www.gromaudio.com).  Inexpensive adapter for factory stereo (fits inline w/ your headunit) which allows iPod/Touch/iPhone operation via headunit or iPod itself.  Very cool, great deal.  You can find them on eBay, as well, via the GROM Audio store.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 30, 2008 at 9:38 AM (CST)

1

I have a ‘07 Jeep Commander with the Mopar iPod Integration kit.  The iPhone thru the Mopar kit, worked from June 29, when I bought it until the iPhone 1.1.3 update.  Now the Mopar kit doesn’t recognize the iPhone.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on January 30, 2008 at 10:25 AM (CST)

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