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Steve Jobs biography leaks, quotes appear online [Updated]

As is common with many literary releases, several copies of late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs’ authorized biography—Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson—have leaked out prior to the book’s official launch on Monday. As expected, early reports of the book have found a number of substantial, interesting quotes and anecdotes within. As it is likely that more stories related to content within the book will be forthcoming over the next several days, we are creating this story as a catch-all for information from the book, and will update it as appropriate when new information emerges.

According to The Associated Press, which purchased a copy of the book yesterday, Jobs considered Google’s copying of iPhone features for its Android OS to be equal to “grand theft.” “I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple’s $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong,” Jobs said. “I’m going to destroy Android, because it’s a stolen product. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this.” He also told then Google CEO Eric Schmidt in a subsequent meeting, “I don’t want your money. If you offer me $5 billion, I won’t want it. I’ve got plenty of money. I want you to stop using our ideas in Android, that’s all I want.”

The same report notes that Jobs called Apple’s senior vice president of industrial design Jonathan Ive his “spiritual partner” at Apple, and told Isaacson that Ive had “more operation power” at Apple than anyone besides Jobs himself, and that no one in the company can tell him what to do, which, Jobs says, is “the way I set it up.”

The New York Times, which also obtained a copy of the book ahead of its release, reports that Jobs spent the first months after he was diagnosed with cancer trying fruit juices, acupuncture, herbal remedies, and other treatments in an effort to avoid surgery, a decision that infuriated family and friends. “The big thing was that he really was not ready to open his body,” Jobs’ wife Laurene Powell said. “It’s hard to push someone to do that.” When Jobs did decide on medical treatment, he did so with his trademark passion, studying and deciding on each treatment, and becoming one of only 20 people in the world to have all the genes of his cancer tumor and his normal DNA sequenced—at a price of $100,000—so as to allow doctors to tailor and target the drugs he was prescribed. Jobs later told Isaacson that he would either be one of the first “to outrun a cancer like this” or be among the last “to die from it.”

The Huffington Post also obtained a copy of the book, and recounts Jobs’ interactions with current President of the United States Barack Obama. “You’re headed for a one-term presidency,” he told Obama at the start of a meeting between the two men in fall 2010. Jobs told Obama that the administration needed to be more business-friendly, citing “regulations and unnecessary costs” which make it more difficult to do business in the U.S. as opposed to foreign countries such as China. Jobs later offered to help create Obama’s political ads for his 2012 reelection campaign, telling Isaacson that he wanted to do for Obama what the “morning in America” advertisements had done for former President Ronald Reagan during his reelection campaign of 1984.

Jobs is also said to have had lingering doubts about his contemporary Bill Gates. While Gates described Jobs as “fundamentally odd” and “weirdly flawed as a human being,” Jobs said that Gates would be “a broader guy if he had dropped acid once or gone off to an ashram when he was younger,” adding that “Bill is basically unimaginative and has never invented anything, which is why I think he’s more comfortable now in philanthropy than technology. He just shamelessly ripped off other people’s ideas.”

Update: According to The Washington Post, which reviewed the biography, Steve Jobs suggested to Isaacson that he had been working on an Apple-branded television set. “He very much wanted to do for television sets what he had done for computers, music players, and phones: make them simple and elegant,” Isaacson wrote in the book. “‘I’d like to create an integrated television set that is completely easy to use,’ he told me. ‘It would be seamlessly synced with all of your devices and with iCloud.’ No longer would users have to fiddle with complex remotes for DVD players and cable channels. ‘It will have the simplest user interface you could imagine. I finally cracked it.’” While it is unclear whether such a device would be dependent on a currently unannounced streaming service or current a la carte programming as offered on iTunes, rumors of such a set have persisted for years, and would be an obvious extension of Apple’s current Apple TV set-top box.

We will update this story with further details as they become available.

Unions, supporters plan iWon’t campaign against Verizon iPhone 5

  • September 30, 2011
  • Other,

Several unions and lobbying groups plan to use the iPhone 5 launch to publicize a union contract dispute with Verizon Wireless. The Communications Workers of America, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the AFL-CIO are being joined by MoveOn.org, US Action, and Jobs with Justice to formally announce the campaign on Monday. Dubbed “iWon’t,” the campaign will ask Americans to delay upgrading to the iPhone 5 on Verizon Wireless until the company agrees to a fair contract with its workers. The group plans to conduct online and grass roots outreach, advertising, and leafleting at hundreds of Verizon Wireless stores starting on Tuesday, October 4th, which it believes—probably incorrectly—will be the launch date of the iPhone 5.

This coalition also aims to expose what it refers to as the “Verizon Tax Loophole,” describing the methods that Verizon is using to avoid paying federal corporate income taxes, and plans to lobby the government to force companies such as Verizon to pay their fair share in federal taxes while respecting workers’ rights. The contract dispute reportedly involved 45,000 Verizon and Verizon Wireless workers, who seek to protect their health care coverage and employee benefits.

Brookstone launches Rover App-Controlled Spy Tank

Brookstone has released the Rover App-Controlled Spy Tank for iOS devices. Controlled wirelessly from an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad using a free universal app, the Rover can explore within a range of to 200 feet streaming live video and sound back to the device. An infrared night vision mode is also available to allow users to navigate Rover in the dark. Users can control the Rover from the app using either on-screen directional arrows or using the accelerometer-based G-Drive mode and can capture still photos from the camera. The Rover Spy Tank runs on 6 included AA batteries and is available from Brookstone for $150.

Amazon undercuts iPad 2 with $79-$199 Kindles

  • September 28, 2011
  • Other,

Directly targeting Apple’s growing iPad ecosystem with even lower-priced alternatives, Amazon today launched a series of three completely new Kindle devices with prices ranging from $79 to $199. The most basic Kindle e-reader will now sell for $79, a drop from the company’s prior $114 price tag for its lowest-end unit, relying on modest screen saver-style ad support and a streamlined design to reduce the price tag. Amazon also announced a new $99 Kindle touch e-reader that employs an IR touch system in place of a physical keyboard, as well as a redesigned user interface that involves taps in place of buttons. The new unit is also reportedly slimmer, smaller and lighter than the current Kindle models. A 3G-enabled model will also be available for $149 with free global roaming.

Amazon also revealed the anticipated Kindle Fire Android-based tablet today at a price of $199. Designed to provide capabilities beyond those of traditional Kindle devices, Kindle Fire uses a custom version of the Android OS on a 7-inch IPS panel, featuring a dual-core CPU, Wi-Fi and a 14.6 ounce chassis. Although it lacks an embedded camera and microphone, or 3G connectivity, Kindle Fire is designed to be a simple touch-based video, music, book, and app-ready device leveraging all of Amazon’s digital stores and services. The device includes a 30-day trial of Amazon Prime, and provides access to the Amazon Appstore, Kindle Books, Amazon Cloud Storage, and introduces WhiperSync bookmarking for movies and TV shows. Amazon chief Jeff Bezos used the introduction of Kindle Fire to jab at the iPad’s need for backups—wired or wireless—by noting that all of Kindle Fire’s media content will be stored in the cloud and re-obtainable as needed. The new Kindles will continue Amazon’s tradition of ultra-simple setup, arriving pre-customized to the recipient’s Amazon account so that previously-purchased content is ready to go right away.

iPad App Developer Leaves Facebook in Frustration

Business Insider reports that Facebook engineer Jeff Verkoeyen, the developer responsible for building the company’s iPad application has left Facebook to take a job at Google. In a post on his blog earlier today, Verkoeyen expressed frustration that Facebook has delayed the release of the iPad app despite the fact that it has been ready to be released for several months. Verkoeyen noted that he was the lead engineer on the Facebook iPad app back in January and put a great deal of time into the app, which was considered “feature-complete’ in May. Despite this, Facebook reportedly kept repeatedly delaying the release, leading Verkoeyen to believe that at this point the app “may never be released.” Verkoeyen has since updated his blog post to remove details about the iPad application and spoke with Business Insider to clarify that the frustration was his “personally” and was not a “reflection on Facebook as a company.”

In June the New York Times reported that Facebook was planning to launch a native iPad app in the “coming weeks” citing people briefed on Facebook’s plans, and native iPad support was later discovered in a July update to the iPhone and iPod touch application. These reports led many to speculate that Facebook was simply waiting to release an iPad app during the company’s f8 developer conference last week, however no mention was made of the iOS platform at all during the keynote presentation, which focused primarily on major new social features for the web.

CableJive dockBoss+ expands speaker dock compatibility

CableJive has introduced its new dockBoss+, a unique accessory that aims to expand the compatibility of most iPod/iPhone/iPad docking audio systems. The dockBoss+ connects to the speaker’s dock using a female connector, which is attached to a single cable that splits into separate 3.5mm headphone plug and micro USB connectors, allowing the system to receive audio from and send power to a wide range of devices, including Android phones and non-Apple audio players. As noted in the description, the accessory does not provide integration features like device control or playlists, leaving it up to the device’s owner to come up with a remote control solution. CableJive’s dockBoss+ USB and audio adapter cable for docking audio systems is available for order now for $30 and is expected to ship September 28.

Amazon announces Kindle textbook rentals

Amazon has launched a new service allowing students to save money by renting textbooks in electronic form. Kindle Textbook Rental allows students to choose from a catalog of tens of thousands of textbooks for their 2011 school year from leading publishers such as John Wiley & Sons, Elsevier and Taylor & Francis and rent them as e-books for only the period of time required for their course work. Users can customize rental periods to any length between 30 and 360 days with pricing based on the rental period, offering pricing up to 80% off the list price of the print versions of the same text books. Existing rentals can be easily extended in increments as small as one day simply by paying for the extra days, and users can re-extend their rental as often as necessary or simply pay to convert the rental to a purchased book.

Kindle Textbook Rental uses a “Rent Once, Read Everywhere” model allowing users to access any of their rented textbooks on any Kindle-supported device, including the iPad, iPhone and iPod touch or on a PC or Mac or other supported smartphone platforms. Amazon has also enhanced its Whispersync technology to preserve notes, annotations and highlighted content in rental textbooks with a user’s Amazon account indefinitely so that if they subsequently rent the same textbook again in the future, all of the annotations will appear as the user left them.  The Amazon Kindle app is available from the App Store as a free download. More information on the Kindle Textbook Rental service can be found at http://www.amazon.com/kindletextbooks.

Verizon LTE phones to have roaming issues, carrier limits?

Verizon Wireless has confirmed that its LTE phones will not “be compatible on other LTE networks in the U.S” due to frequency differences, according to a PCMag report. The article notes that although the new 4G LTE system being implemented by Verizon, MetroPCS and AT&T uses a SIM card system similar to GSM, carriers such as Verizon may be building phones to run only on their own wireless frequencies, preventing their devices from being used on competing networks, even for roaming where Verizon-specific LTE coverage may be unavailable.

Although both Verizon and AT&T use the 700MHz LTE band, their networks use different frequencies within that spectrum with very little overlap. Other U.S. carriers use 1700MHz and 1500MHz frequencies, while even more LTE bands are available to international carriers, suggesting that it may also be challenging to roam internationally with LTE devices. It is unclear at this point what plans other carriers such as AT&T have with regard to the frequencies used by their LTE phones, and whether Apple will be able to offer universal LTE world phones that avoid the need for multiple versions.

Pangea Software announces Anniversary Giveaway

To commemorate the third anniversary of the App Store, Pangea Software has announced that it is making all of its iOS games available for free for a one-day event. Today, July 11th from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM CST every Pangea title is available from the App Store as a free download, after which they will go on sale for just $1 per app. Pangea’s iOS games include are normally priced at $3-4 each and include Enigmo, Enigmo 2, Enigmo Deluxe, Billy Frontier, Bugdom 2, Cro-Mag Rally, Antimatter, Warheads, Nanosaur 2, Otto Matic and Quarters.

Pangea Software was among the first game companies on the App Store when it debuted three years ago and has experienced great success in developing iPhone apps with over $7 million in sales since 2008. “iOS and the App Store are the most important things to come along in the video game industry in a generation,” said Brian Greenstone, President of Pangea Software, “We’ve been very fortunate to have been a part of this, so to say ‘Thank You’ to all of our awesome customers we’re hosting the biggest giveaway the App Store has ever seen.” The company also reports that it is actively working on major updates to many of its games for iOS 5, with significant updates in store for its multiplayer networked games Nanosaur 2 and Cro-Mag Rally.

Electronic Arts to acquire PopCap Games?

TechCrunch reports that PopCap Games, makers of hit iOS titles such as Peggle and Plants vs Zombies is currently in talks to be acquired for a price of over $1 billion. Initial reports speculated on Zynga, Electronic Arts or an Asian company being possible buyers, however TechCrunch has now received information from two sources that the buyer is Electronic Arts. If accurate, the $1 billion price of the deal would make this one of EA’s largest acquisitions to date, although the report suggests that this may be an effort by EA to depart from its more hardcore games and solidify its position as a casual gaming powerhouse. EA has been making major acquisitions in the iOS and general mobile gaming space over the past year buying publisher Chillingo last fall and most recently acquiring FireMint just last month.

Facebook planning iOS photo-sharing app?

Facebook is planning to launch its own standalone photo-sharing app for iOS devices, according to a new report. Citing roughly 50MB of images and documents related to the app, TechCrunch reports that the app—internally referred to as “Hovertown” or “WithPeople”—is built on top of Facebook’s existing social network, but functions more like standalone photo-sharing apps and services such as Path, Instagram, and Color. TechCrunch claims that it will be posting more on the app soon; we will update this story when/if any new information is available.

Garmin acquires Navigon

Garmin Ltd and Navigon AG announced today that the two companies have signed an agreement for Garmin to acquire privately-held Navigon AG. Known in the iOS community for its very popular MobileNavigator series of turn-by-turn GPS apps, Navigon also manufactures a number of portable navigation devices as well as developing software for PNDs and other smartphone platforms. In announcing the acquisition, Garmin’s president and COO Cliff Pemble highlighted the strategic nature of Navigon’s application portfolio, stating that “With Navigon, we are also acquiring one of the top-selling navigation applications for the iPhone and Android platforms – something that we expect will help drive revenue for the combined company going forward.” Although one of the largest GPS navigation product manufacturers, Garmin was relatively late in releasing its own turn-by-turn GPS app for the iOS platform, debuting its StreetPilot application for iOS only six months ago after an earlier announcement in November that it was abandoning its own Nuvifone GPS smartphone product. It is unclear whether both the Garmin and Navigon iOS apps will continue to be developed independently; however Navigon will continue to operate as a subsidiary of Garmin Ltd. The acquisition is still subject to regulatory approvals and other closing conditions and financial terms of the transaction are not being released.

Twitter acquires TweetDeck

TweetDeck has officially announced its acquisition by Twitter following rumours over the past several weeks that a deal has been in the works. In a post on the TweetDeck blog, founder Iain Dodsworth confirmed that the company completed the deal on Tuesday and is presently in the process of “joining the flock.” Dodsworth goes on to indicate that Twitter has acquired TweetDeck for its focus on the “Twitter-centric power-user,” suggesting that Twitter is looking to leverage TweetDeck as a tool for more advanced users who are not adequately served by twitter.com or the current official mobile clients. Dodsworth also notes that although some changes should be expected, the TweetDeck team will remain in place and based out of London “with the same focus and products” as before. This latest move by Twitter follows last year’s acquisition of Tweetie which became the official Twitter mobile client for iOS devices.

TinyCo announces $5m Mobile Game Development Fund

iOS and Android game developer TinyCo has announced a new $5 million gaming fund to encourage mobile game development by providing developers with capital and resources to successfully launch their products. This new initiative, dubbed the TinyFund, will provide monetary assistance of up to $500,000 per title to game developers creating any type of game for the iPhone, iPad or Android platforms, including both paid and free titles.

TinyCo has launched five top grossing iOS games in the last year, including Tiny Chef, Tiny Zoo and Tap Resort. The company’s games have all appeared on the top 10 free game charts in the App Store and have received over 20 million downloads in total. TinyCo also recently closed a new $18 million funding round led by Andreessen Horowitz. Games that are supported through the TinyFund will receive access to TinyCo’s large and rapidly growing user base and TinyCo will offer marketing, development and business assistance to game developers as needed to assist with bringing their projects to the widest possible audience.

TinyCo is accepting applications from developers worldwide and games in any stages of development from early concept to completed games will be considered for support. Proposals will be reviewed by a specially selected team of TinyCo executives who will determine what funding and additional support may be required to produce the best possible games. Developers can submit their proposals at the TinyFund site; the company plans on announcing funding recipients in the third quarter of this year.

Lodsys clarifies position on iOS patent claims

Following reports on Friday that several iOS developers had received claims of patent infringement over the use of in-app purchases, Lodsys has attempted to clarify its position in a series of posts on its blog. In the posts, the company notes that Apple is a licensee, as are other large companies such as Google and Microsoft. However, it is Lodsys’ claim that its license does not automatically extend rights to Apple’s third-party developers, and that companies such as Apple cannot currently extend the rights to include independent third-party developers.

Lodsys has outlined the licensing fees that it is demanding from developers, stating that it is “seeking 0.575% of US revenue over the period of the notice letter to the expiration of the patent, plus applicable past usage.” The company estimates that a developer will pay $5,750 for $1m in revenues. Notably, the notices sent to developers on Friday morning did not include any mention of fees, indicating only that the developers had 21 days to license the technology. [via Engadget]

PCalc 2.4 released

James Thomson has decided to release PCalc 2.4 following indications earlier today that he was considering delaying its release due to a series of widespread patent claims against Thomson and several other iOS developers. PCalc 2.4 adds several new features including a “Frac” button on many layouts for faster fraction entry and swap buttons in the conversion section for quickly setting the base unit. Support for several new unit conversions has also been added including lighting units such as lumens and footcandles and inches and millimetres of mercury and water for pressure conversions. Users can also now choose to disable auto-lock while using the app and several new digit styles have been added and improved along with numerous other small fixes and enhancements.

PCalc is available in two versions: PCalc Lite Calculator is a free version that provides advanced calculator functionality including an optional RPN mode, basic unit conversions and two themes, with additional options available via in-app purchase such as engineering and scientific notation support, hexadecimal, octal and binary calculations and additional themes. Alternatively, users can purchase the full version, PCalc RPN Calculator for $10 which includes all of the optional modules. Both versions are universal apps supporting the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad.

Samsung to show high-res tablet screen prototype

Samsung has announced that it will be demonstrating a 10.1-inch, 2560x1600 display at the SID Display Week 2011 International Symposium, which runs from May 17-19. According to the release, the display uses PenTile RGBW technology, which allows for the 300 dpi resolution. “Samsung’s PenTile display technology is the only display technology that operates at 40 percent less power yet provides twice that of Full HD-viewing performance for consumers compared to legacy RGB stripe LCDs. There is no other commercial display technology on the market today that offers this high of a resolution and pixel density in a 10.1-inch size display,” said Dr. Sungtae Shin, Senior VP of Samsung Electronics. As noted by TUAW, while the screen size and pixel density do appear to confirm that an iPad-sized Retina Display is possible, it is extremely unlikely that Apple would use this particular part in a future iPad, due to its larger size and resolution beyond that of a pixel-doubled iPad display.

Electronic Arts acquires Firemint (Updated)

TechCrunch reports that Electronic Arts has acquired Australian iOS game developer Firemint. Known for popular iOS titles such as the Real Racing series and Flight Control, Firemint will now become part of EA Interactive, the parent division of EA Mobile, Pogo and Playfish. Terms of the acquisition have not been disclosed at this time, although EA indicates the deal is “not material to the company.” The deal is expected to close within four weeks. [via Touch Arcade]

Update: Firemint CEO Rob Murray has revealed some additional details on the company’s blog describing the acquisition as “business as usual.” Murray notes that Firemint will remain in Australia and continue to operate with “very high levels of autonomy” with Murray continuing to run Firemint and focus on the company’s current games and customers.

Mobigame releases Bulletproof by Amnesty International

iOS game developer Mobigame and French agency La chose have released a new game in recognition of the 50th Anniversary of Amnesty International. The game, Bulletproof, challenges players to quickly stop bullets from a firing squad executing a man condemned to death by an oppressive regime. Players stop bullets by tapping on the touchscreen as each bullet is fired and the game provides several levels of increasing difficulty; at each level the player must stop a specified number of bullets allowing as few as possible to get through. Bulletproof is available from the App Store for $1 with all revenues going to Amnesty International in support of its work defending human rights.

Mysterious device listing appears on, removed from App Store

A mysterious device string appeared earlier today on some App Store product pages, leading to speculation that Apple could be planning to allow a fourth device to download apps from the App Store. Panic software developer Cabel Sasser first spotted the string, “ix.Mac.MarketingName,” earlier this morning in the requirements section of the listing for his company’s new iOS app Prompt; he speculated that the text could be a placeholder string for a mysterious new fourth device. While an App Store for the Apple TV has been the subject of past speculation, the string in question appears to point to some sort of Mac compatibility for iOS applications, even though its disclosure at this point was most likely the result of an error. [via Mac Rumors]

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