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Vegas casinos warned of card-counting iPhone app

Nevada gambling regulators have warned the state’s casinos about a card-counting application that runs on the iPhone and iPod touch. Card counting enables Blackjack players to track the high and low cards played, so that bets can be adjusted when odds are in their favor. While the trick is not illegal, it is heavily frowned upon by casinos, and the use of devices to help count cards is a felony in some jurisdictions. The Nevada regulators originally learned of the app from California regulators, who had been informed by employees of an Indian casino. No specific application is mentioned in the original report, however, there are at least two card counting apps—Card Counter ($3) and A Blackjack Card Counter ($4)—currently available from the App Store.

Apple sued over iPhone screen drawing tech

Piscel Technologies, a mobile software developer, has filed suit against Apple claiming that the graphics rendering technology used in the iPhone and iPod touch infringes on Piscel’s patents. The complaint claims that Apple’s methods for accelerating movements such as panning and zooming effectively copy Piscel’s own acceleration technologies. Piscel currently supplies software to other mobile manufacturers such as Sharp, Motorola, and Palm, although it is unclear whether these relationships involve the specific rendering technologies referenced in the suit. Piscel is seeking full damages according to the number of iPhone OS devices already sold, in addition to punitive damages equaling triple the original damages amount.

Google enables spreadsheet edits from iPhone

Google has made changes to its Google Docs site to allow spreadsheet editing from mobile devices such as the iPhone and iPod touch. The changes allow users to view, edit, sort, and filter spreadsheets, and are available in all 38 languages supported in Google Docs spreadsheets. It is unclear when or if the company plans to add mobile editing to the other supported document formats. To access the new features, simply visit m.google.com/docs from your iPhone or iPod touch.

Apple: Jailbreaking iPhones and iPod touches is illegal

In comments filed with the U.S. Copyright Office related to a proposed new exemption to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), which would explicitly allow jailbreaking of iPhones, Apple has argued that jailbreaking constitutes copyright infringement and a DMCA violation, and is therefore illegal. The company claims that jailbroken iPhones depend on modified versions of Apple’s copyrighted bootloader and operating system software, and that these more open versions compromise safety, security, and reliability, along with making it easier for users who wish to pirate software. In the days following the iPhone’s release, Apple actively combatted jailbreaking through changes to the device’s software; it had appeared to give these measures less attention since the launch of iPhone OS 2.0 and the App Store, which provides a legal way to add applications to the devices. [via BoingBoing]

Next-generation iPhone photos leaked online?

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New photos supposedly showing the back casing of the next-generation iPhone have been posted online. Mac Rumors claims that the images originate from China, showing a matte-black 16GB iPhone back casing, carrying the previously unused model number A1303. Apart from the matte black surface and what appears to be a white Apple logo, the backing is quite similar to that of the iPhone 3G in both the location of the holes and interior layout. Previous pre-announcement leaks of iPhone casings have been surprisingly accurate, however, it remains unclear whether this will actually be the rear shell of a next-generation device.

China Unicom in negotiations with Apple over iPhone

Following a report from earlier this week indicating that Apple and China Mobile had broken off talks over the iPhone due to a disagreement over control of the App Store, a new report states that rival carrier China Unicom is now in talks to bring the handset to mainland China. “Yes, we are in talks with Apple Inc.,” a Unicom manager told China Business News. China Unicom plans to rollout a new WCDMA network on May 17, but it is unclear whether a deal between the two companies could be completed in time. “China Unicom has held several rounds of negotiations with Apple Inc.,” said an anonymous source within the company, “but there are still many obstacles ahead.” According to the report, the companies have yet to come to an agreement on what apps may come pre-installed on the device, and are also facing difficulties due to regulatory issues and disagreement on policy restrictions and business model differences. [via MDN]

Google launches Google Sync for iPhone

Google today launched a beta version of its Google Sync service for the iPhone and iPod touch. Google Sync is a two-way push synchronization service that works with Gmail contacts and Google Calendars, allowing users to update information from either their iPhone or iPod touch, using the built-in Calendar and Contacts applications, or from any traditional computer, using the web browser. The new Sync service uses the Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync protocol, and Google warns that enabling the Sync service will automatically delete any existing contacts and calendar information from the device. For more information on Google Sync or to set up the service on a device, visit m.google.com/sync.

China Mobile iPhone talks break down over App Store control

The latest round of negotiations between Apple and China Mobile have broken down due to a disagreement over control of the App Store, a new report indicates. Interfax TMT China, citing a source at the China Mobile Research Institute, states that China Mobile president Wang Jianzhou outlined the turbulent negotiations on a recent visit to the Institute. The negotiations are said to have gone through three distinct rounds, spanning 18 months and involving both Apple CEO Steve Jobs and COO Tim Cook. Jianzhou reportedly claimed that initial negotiations broke down due to Apple’s insistence on revenue sharing, while the second round of talks failed after Apple offered to sell iPhones to the carrier for $600 and required that China Mobile subsidize iPhone service bundles.

The third, and reportedly final, round of negotiations is said to ended over Apple’s insistence that it, rather than China Mobile, sell applications for the device directly to customers via the App Store. Jianzhou saw the offer as possibly detrimental to China Mobile’s dominance of the country’s mobile Internet industry. “Wang said China Mobile should operate the application store itself in order to maintain its advantage,” the Institute source said, noting that Chinese customers have preferred to make purchases through deposits in their mobile phone accounts rather than through the credit cards required by the App Store. Apple currently sells an unlocked model of the iPhone 3G in Hong Kong, directly from its own website.

Orange Austria matches 8GB iPhone 3G price drop

Orange Austria has now matched (Translated Link) T-Mobile’s lowered pricing on the 8GB iPhone 3G. Like T-Mobile, Orange is now offering the 8GB model for just €1 when purchased with a €35/month tariff and €14 a month “iPhone Pack,” which includes 3GB of data and 100 SMS texts. T-Mobile first dropped its pricing on the smaller-capacity model last month; curiously, both promotions are slated to end on February 14. It is unclear whether the price drops are a result of slower than expected demand, or indicative of an upcoming change to the iPhone 3G lineup. Apple bumped the maximum capacity of the original iPhone from 8GB to 16GB in February 2008.

Google launches Google Book Search for iPhone

Google has launched a mobile version of its Google Book Search service. The new iPhone- and iPod touch-friendly interface gives users access to over 1.5 million public domain books directly from their device. The books have been optimized to be read on a small screen, and are available for free. To access Google Book Search mobile, simply visit books.google.com/m from your iPhone or iPod touch.

Orange loses appeal to regain iPhone exclusivity

France Telecom’s Orange brand has failed to regain its iPhone exclusivity in France after the Paris Appeal Court confirmed a French Competition Council ruling that the exclusivity agreement with Apple was to be suspended. The Competition Council previously said that the five-year deal was “clearly excessive” and that it risked “serious and immediate damage to competition on the mobile market and to consumers.” France Telecom, which has argued the watchdog had “put the market economy into question”, told Reuters it was “surprised” at the failure of its appeal and will now appeal to France’s highest court, the Cour de Cassation.

Four new suits filed against Apple over iPhone 3G speeds

Apple has been sued four times over the last two weeks over poor 3G performance. Complaints filed in Florida, New Jersey, and Texas all claim that the iPhone 3G suffers from both 3G performance issues that result in dropped network connections and hairline cracks in its casing, while a separate case in California omits the cracking issue, focusing solely on 3G problems. Interestingly, the California suit is the only one which does not name U.S. iPhone carrier AT&T as well as Apple. All four lawsuits allege that Apple knowingly marketed the phone without disclosing the performance issues and seek damages, while the Florida and New Jersey suits seek to stop the companies from continuing “false and misleading advertising,” the California suit seeks the return of all profits Apple received plus interest, and the Texas suit seeks for the return of all profits gained by “misleading” advertising as well as a disclaimer to be put on the product’s packaging.

The four suits represent the latest entries in an ongoing string of legal battles between AT&T and Apple and iPhone 3G owners, many of which have made claims similar to those found in these complaints. Testing of the iPhone 3G showed the handset to be “completely normal” in terms of its ability to receive 3G signals, however, network speeds and reliability have varied dramatically from location to location in other tests, with AT&T network differences apparently to blame. Apple has previously contended that “no reasonable person” would have taken the company’s “twice as fast for half the price” slogan at face value.

Updated: A request for reader comments on iPhone 3G lawsuits, service, and warranty issues has been posted.

iPhone 3G in UAE this month, new iPhone in June

The iPhone 3G will launch in the United Arab Emirates on February 15, according to an Emirates Business 24/7 report. Abu Dhabi-based Etisalat announced in a local newspaper that it would be brining the iPhone to the region this month; the launch date was later confirmed by Mark Davis, Program Director for iPhone at Etisalat. Davis went on to explain that iPhone users who have already obtained an unlocked handset through third-party channels will also be welcome to use Etisalat’s service. Etisalat has reportedly been working on the project for two years and finally signed an agreement with Apple at the end of 2008. “It is a long process to get approved by Apple as they only want one operator in every country. We passed the test mainly because of our market capitalisation, retail presence and deep pockets and the demographics.” Curiously, the report also states that the next version of the iPhone is “due out in June,” and while it doesn’t attribute this information directly to Davis, there is a strong possibility the date came from him, as his interview serves as the basis for the story.

Update: Feb. 20, 2009 Etisalat’s Mobily brand will offer the iPhone 3G in Saudi Arabia, and is now allowing customers to reserve a handset through its website. Plans and pricing have yet to be announced.

Update: February 23, 2009 Etisalat has launched the iPhone 3G in the UAE and in Saudi Arabia through its Mobily brand. In the UAE, the 8GB model will be offered for free with the most expensive, 643 AED (roughly $175) monthly plan, which includes 500 minutes of talk time, 300 SMS texts, and 2000 MB of data. Handset pricing increases with lesser plans, from 560 AED (~$152) with a 504 AED (~$137) monthly plan, to 840 AED (~$229) with a 349 AED (~$95) monthly plan, and finally to 2,646 AED (~$720) with a 199 AED (~$54) monthly plan. The 16GB model is priced similarly, with prices ranging from 375 AED (~$102) with the most expensive plan to 3,090 AED (~$841) with the least expensive.

Pricing in Saudi Arabia is less dependent on plans, with the 16GB model priced at 2,650 SRI (~$707) and the 8GB at 2,255 SRI (~$602) with a 99 SRI ($26) monthly plan. The iPhone 3G will also be available for prepaid customers, selling for 2,800 SRI (~$748) for the 16GB model and 2,400 SRI (~$640) for the 8GB.

iPhone Software 2.2.1 causing iTunes crashes

A large number of iPhone users are reporting on Apple’s discussion boards that iTunes crashes upon trying to sync after installation of Software 2.2.1. Interestingly, the crashes do not appear isolated to the iPhone, as some users have reported that iTunes will crash when trying to sync an iPod as well; others have said that the failed syncs have left them with corrupted audio files on the iPhone. Some users have suggested the problem lies with Apple’s DRM, as they have been able to successfully sync all non-DRM’d content. In addition, at least two iPhone users reported being able to sync after downloading application updates through iTunes, however, it is unknown whether this workaround will work for all affected users.

Adobe CEO: Apple ‘collaborating’ on Flash for iPhone

Apple is collaborating with Adobe in an effort to bring Flash to the iPhone, according to a statement made by Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen at the recent World Economic Forum. “It’s a hard technical challenge, and that’s part of the reason Apple and Adobe are collaborating,” Narayen said. “The ball is in our court. The onus is on us to deliver.” Apple CEO Steve Jobs has previously said Adobe needed to create a third version of Flash, as he deemed the full Flash player “too slow” on the iPhone, but the Lite version too stripped-down. It is unclear from Narayen’s statement exactly how Apple might be helping the company in this process, or how exactly the software will work once completed.

O’Reilly releases iPhone SDK Appplication Development

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O’Reilly Media has released iPhone SDK Application Development by Johnathan Zdziarski, the publisher’s latest book on iPhone development. The book explains how to design user interface elements with Interface Builder and the UI Kit framework, create application controls, build and manage layers and transformations using Core Graphics and Quartz Core, mix and play sound files, handle network programming, use Core Location, and more. Designed to benefit both beginner and experienced developers, iPhone SDK Application Development is available now for $35 in print, or $28 in PDF format.

Firmware points to next-generation iPhone model

Evidence of a next-generation iPhone model has been found in the latest version of the iPhone’s firmware. Mac Rumors notes that a string in the USBDeviceConfiguration.plist file contains information for a device labeled “iPhone2,1,” while the original iPhone carried the designation “iPhone 1,1” and the iPhone 3G was labeled “iPhone 1,2.” For comparison, the first-generation iPod touch was labeled “iPod 1,1” while the second-generation model is labeled “iPod 2,1” due to its significant hardware differences such as volume buttons, an internal speaker, and integrated Nike+iPod support. The existence of a next-generation iPhone is further supported by the appearance of a device labeled “iPhone 2,1” appearing in a developer’s PinchMedia ad serving reports, suggesting that Apple is currently testing the device for a near-term release.

CEA fills 2010 CES iLounge Pavilion in 3 days, quadruples size [Updated]

Thanks to an overwhelming response from the iPod and iPhone community, the Consumer Electronics Association and iLounge are pleased to announce a dramatic expansion of the iLounge Pavilion at the 2010 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES). According to CEA, the original space allocated for the Pavilion was completely sold within three days after the announcement, leading to a substantial waiting list. In order to accommodate continued interest from iPod, iPhone, and even Mac vendors, CEA has quadrupled the pavilion’s size, creating a massive presence for Apple accessory, software, and service providers on the 2010 CES show floor. Vendors interested in exhibiting at the 2010 International CES should contact Tira Gordon ([email protected]) immediately for additional information.

Update: CEA has issued its official press release announcing the record-breaking response and pavilion expansion.

 

iPhone SDK updated for iPhone OS 2.2.1

Apple has released its iPhone SDK for iPhone OS 2.2.1. Weighing in at 1.75 GB and listed as build 9M2621a, the new SDK requires Mac OS X 10.5.5, and includes new, optional GCC and LLVM compilers, an updated project assistant, a simplified toolbar, and additional security enhancements. The iPhone SDK for iPhone OS 2.2.1 is available now to registered iPhone developers via Apple’s iPhone Dev Center.

Apple releases Software 2.2.1 for iPhone, iPod touch

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Apple has released its iPhone Software 2.2.1 Update for the iPhone, iPhone 3G, first-, and second-generation iPod touch. According to Apple, the iPhone update offers “bug fixes and improvements,” including improved stability for Safari, and a fix for an issue where some images saved from Mail didn’t display correctly in the Camera Roll. The iPod touch update also fixes an issue that caused some Apple Lossless files to skip during playback. iPhone Software 2.2.1 is available now through the Update feature in iTunes.

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