News | iLounge

News

Apple, others sued over anti-poaching agreements

Apple was among a group of companies sued earlier this week over so-called “anti-poaching” agreements. The law firm of Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein announced that Apple, along with Adobe, Google, Intel, Intuit, Lucasfilm, and Pixar, has been named in a class action lawsuit filed by former Lucasfilm engineer Siddharth Hariharan, claiming that the companies violated antitrust laws by conspiring to fix the pay of their employees and entering into “No Solicitation” agreements with each other. As noted in the announcement, an agreement between Lucasfilm and Pixar surfaced in 2005, and were soon joined by similar agreements between the other defendants; the U.S. Department of Justice finalized a settlement in September 2010 that barred Adobe, Apple, Google, Intel, Intuit, and Pixar for participating in such agreements. The suit seeks restitution for lost compensation and treble damages for anti-competitive employment practices. [via Mac Rumors]

Apple hires Lucasfilm vet, THX creator Holman?

Apple has hired Tomlinson Holman, former corporate technical director for Lucasfilm, according to a new report. Citing a tweet from tech pundit Leo Laporte, GigaOM reports that Laporte has it “on good authority” that Holman is joining Apple to “run audio.” Currently a film professor at USC, Holman is considered the primary mind behind Lucasfilm’s THX sound technology and the world’s first 10.2 surround sound system, and has received an Academy Award for Technical Achievement for his contributions. According to the report, Holman also has experience designing loudspeakers and amplifiers; it is unclear what projects Holman might be involved in at Apple, or what his official title might be.

Apple releases iOS 4.3.3, fixes location bug

image

Apple has released iOS 4.3.3, the latest version of its mobile operating system for the iPad, iPad 2, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4 (GSM), iPod touch 3G, and iPod touch 4G. According to Apple’s release notes, the update contains changes to the iOS crowd-sourced location database cache; the update reduces the size of the cache, no longer backs up the cache to iTunes, and deletes the cache entirely when Location Services is turned off. The database in question was the cause of a recent uproar over Apple’s supposed location tracking, leading the company to release a Q&A document in which it gave an explanation for the cache, and blamed its large size on a “bug.” iOS 4.3.3 is available now via the Update feature in iTunes; a similar update, iOS 4.2.8, is also available for the CDMA iPhone 4.

Apple airs new iPad 2 spot ‘If You Asked’

image

Apple has begun airing its latest TV advertisement for the iPad 2. Entitled “If You Asked,” the 30-second spot shows iPad 2 units in a variety of settings with task-specific apps, while the narrator states, “If you ask a parent, they might call it intuitive. If you ask a musician, they might call it inspiring. To a doctor, it’s groundbreaking. To a CEO, it’s powerful. To a teacher, it’s the future. If you ask a child, she might call it magic. And if you asked us, we’d say it’s just getting started.” The new commercial is now available for viewing on Apple’s website.

Apple bans promo code-incentivized app ratings and reviews

Apple has reportedly made a change in its App Store app review policies preventing reviews or ratings of applications downloaded using promotional codes. Mac Rumors reports that the change has been made to “prevent comprimising [sic] of the rating system,” presumably by developers providing promo codes in exchange for positive reviews and high ratings of their applications. It remains unclear whether this new policy affects all promo codes and countries or only those issued since the new policy came into effect.

Apple wins initial ruling against Elan at ITC

Apple has won an initial ruling in its patent dispute with Elan Microelectronics. Reuters reports that Judge Paul Luckern of the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) said in his initial decision that Apple did not violate Elan’s patents related to touchpad technology. Elan filed a complaint against Apple with the ITC in March 2010, claiming that Apple was violating its patents related to touch-sensitive input devices with multi-touch capabilities, specifically with the iPhone, iPod touch, MacBook laptops, the Magic Mouse, and the iPad; the ITC agreed to investigate the claims roughly a month later. The full ITC will now need to rule on whether to accept or reject Luckern’s initial decision; that ruling is expected in August.

Time, Apple reach deal on iPad access for print subscribers

Time, Inc. and Apple have reached a deal that allows subscribers to the print editions of Sports Illustrated, Fortune, and Time to download the iPad versions of the magazines free of charge. The Wall Street Journal reports that the deal is an expansion of a similar arrangement for Time’s People magazine, which has allowed print subscribers free access to the iPad edition since last August. Time and other major publishers still have yet to agree with Apple on terms for selling subscriptions to iPad editions of their publications, mainly due to Apple’s stance on sharing user information with the publishers, according to the report. Time executives told the WSJ that Time general counsel Maurice Edelson has quietly been leading talks between the publisher and Apple, meeting frequently with Apple vice president of Internet services Eddy Cue. The same people said this latest deal is a sign that the two companies are moving closer.

Samsung brings legal battle with Apple to U.S.

image

Samsung has expanded its legal battle with Apple, filing a lawsuit against the iPhone-maker in U.S. federal court. Bloomberg reports that Samsung is claiming that Apple infringes on 10 of its patents related to “fundamental innovations that increase mobile device reliability, efficiency, and quality, and improve user interface in mobile handsets and other products.” “Samsung is continuing to respond actively to the legal action taken against us,” the company said in an statement. Apple first sued Samsung on April 18, stating, “[r]ather than innovate and develop its own technology and a unique Samsung style for its smart phone products and computer tablets, Samsung chose to copy Apple’s technology, user interface and innovative style in these infringing products.” Samsung quickly countersued in South Korea, Japan, and Germany, claiming infringement on 10 patents by the iPhone and iPad; according to recent comments made by Apple COO Tim Cook, Apple is Samsung’s biggest customer and considers them a valued component supplier, and that he expects their strong relationship to continue despite the lawsuit.

Apple purchases iCloud.com domain for $4.5 million?

Apple has purchased the iCloud.com domain name for $4.5 million, according to a new report. Citing an anonymous tipster, GigaOM reports that iCloud.com was until recently used by Sweden-based Xcerion for its cloud-based storage service, which has since been rebranded as CloudMe. The source, who is said to be familiar with the company, said Xcerion sold the iCloud domain to Apple for $4.5 million, although the Whois database still lists Xcerion as the owner of the domain. As noted in the article, Apple is reportedly working on a cloud-based “locker” for content that could be branded as iCloud; it could also be considering the name for its upcoming cloud-based music service.

Update: Citing sources “in position to know,” AllThingsD reports that it has “confirmed” Apple’s purchase of the iCloud.com domain name.

Apple execs Jobs, Schiller, Forstall talk iOS location

Ina Fried of AllThingsD has conducted a phone interview with Apple CEO Steve Jobs, Senior Vice President of Worldwide Product Marketing Phil Schiller, and Senior Vice President of iOS Software Scott Forstall, during which the Apple executives a number of comments relating to the iOS location data issue, as well as the white iPhone. For the most part, the executives simply reiterated points the company made in its earlier Q&A document, but Jobs did reveal that he expected Apple to testify before Congress about such technologies, and that he thinks it is “great that they are investigating this.” He also briefly mentioned the traffic service alluded to in the aforementioned Q&A document, saying “that is all we are going to mention at this point in time before we have something to announce,” and brushed aside a question about his timeline for returning to work full-time at the company.

Discussing the white iPhone 4, Schiller described the process of making the handset as “challenging,” saying, “it’s not as simple as making something white. There’s a lot more that goes into both the material science of it–how it holds up over time… but also in how it all works with the sensors.” He added that while there were unexpected interactions between the color and various internal components, the white paint also required more UV protection than the black model. “We thought we were there a year ago, or less than that, when we launched the iPhone 4 and we weren’t,” Schiller said, adding that the wait allowed them to deliver a product that was up to expectations. Jobs also noted that the work necessary to bring the white iPhone 4 to market benefitted the company in other areas, saying, “[w]e obviously think about this in a generic way because you have a white iPad.” Apple will launch the white iPhone 4 tomorrow.

Apple to launch iPad 2 in 12 more countries this week

Apple has announced that it will launch the iPad 2 in 12 more countries this week. According to the company, the iPad 2 will launch in Japan on Thursday, April 28, and will come to Hong Kong, India, Israel, Korea, Macau, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Turkey and the UAE on Friday, April 29. In addition, the company has announced that it will officially launch iPad 2 with Wi-Fi in China on Friday, May 6; further international availability will be announced at a later date.

Apple posts Q & A on Location Data

Apple has posted a ten-question Q & A document discussing the collection of location data on iOS devices. In response to the first question, “Why is Apple tracking the location of my iPhone?”, the company writes, “Apple is not tracking the location of your iPhone. Apple has never done so and has no plans to ever do so.” The second question asks why, then, is everyone so concerned; Apple responds by saying that users are confused, partially because creators of new technology—including itself—have not provided enough education about such issues. In response to the third question, “Why is my iPhone logging my location?”, Apple explains that the iPhone—and presumably other iOS devices—are not logging locations, but “maintaining a database of Wi-Fi hotspots and cell towers around your current location, some of which may be located more than one hundred miles away from your iPhone, to help your iPhone rapidly and accurately calculate its location when requested.”

Apple blames the size of the current on-device database on a bug it has uncovered, which is also to blame for the continued updating of the database after Location Services is turned off. Interestingly, Apple admits to “collecting anonymous traffic data to build a crowd-sourced traffic database with the goal of providing iPhone users an improved traffic service in the next couple of years.” In response to the final question, “Does Apple believe that personal information security and privacy are important?”, the company responds, “Yes, we strongly do. For example, iPhone was the first to ask users to give their permission for each and every app that wanted to use location. Apple will continue to be one of the leaders in strengthening personal information security and privacy.”

Apple states that it will release a free iOS update “in the next few weeks” that will reduce the size of the crowd-sourced Wi-Fi hotspot and cell tower database cached on the iPhone, cease backing up this cache, and delete the cache entirely when Location Services is turned off, and promises that the next major iOS software release will encrypt the database on the iPhone.

White iPhone 4 coming April 28

image

Apple has announced that it will officially launch the white iPhone 4 Thursday, April 28. According to the company, the handset will be available in Austria, Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Macau, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, the U.K., and the U.S. tomorrow, and will come to “many more” countries around the world soon. The press release notes that the white model will be available from both AT&T and Verizon in the U.S., suggesting that other CDMA carriers worldwide may carry it as well. “The white iPhone 4 has finally arrived and it’s beautiful,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. “We appreciate everyone who has waited patiently while we’ve worked to get every detail right.” Pricing for the white iPhone 4 will be the same as for the black model, or $199/16GB or $299/32GB with a two-year commitment on AT&T or Verizon.

Amazon responds in ‘App Store’ lawsuit, requests dismissal

Amazon has filed a response in its lawsuit with Apple, in which the latter accuses Amazon of trademark infringement and unfair competition for its use of the “App Store” trademark. In its response, which has been published online by GeekWire (PDF Link), Amazon admits to opening a software store with the name Appstore, but denies that Apple coined the App Store mark, and claims that the term “app store” is generic and unprotectable. It also points to a comment made by Apple CEO Steve Jobs in October 2010, in which he uses the term “app store” in a generic sense, saying that Apple’s App Store is “the easiest-to-use, largest app store in the world, preloaded on every iPhone.” Notably, Microsoft has used similar arguments in its opposition to Apple’s “App Store” trademark, the review of which is still ongoing. Amazon is asking the judge to dismiss the case, and to declare that its use of the words “app store” does not infringe or dilute any rights, trademark or otherwise, of Apple. [via Mac Rumors]

Apple sued over iOS location tracking

Apple has been sued in federal court over iOS 4’s ability to track device location. Bloomberg reports that Vikram Ajjampur, a Florida-based iPhone user, and William Devito, a New York iPad user, have filed suit against Apple in Tampa, FL, accusing Apple of invasion of privacy and computer fraud, and seeking an order barring the alleged location data collection. The plaintiffs are seeking class action status to represent U.S. customers whose devices run iOS 4, a group that could include one-third to one-half the country’s 60 million iPhone users, according to Aaron Mayer, an attorney for the plaintiffs. “We take issue specifically with the notion that Apple is now basically tracking people everywhere they go,” Mayer told Bloomberg in a phone interview. “If you are a federal marshal you have to have a warrant to do this kind of thing, and Apple is doing it without one.”

iOS location tracking draws government inquiries, Jobs responds

A report from last week revealing that iOS 4 devices regularly record their positions to hidden files has sparked a wave of inquiries from government agencies and representatives. According to the New York Times, Senator Al Franken of Minnesota and Representative Ed Markey of Massachusetts have contacted Apple separately, each asking for an explanation as to why the location data was being collected and stored, and what it was being used for. The same report indicates that various agencies in Germany, Italy, and France are planning investigations and/or inquiries into the matter, while Politico reports that the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is also looking into it. Separately, Bloomberg reports that South Korea’s Korea Communications Commission has also asked Apple how often the location data is collected and saved, whether users have a choice over whether it is saved or deleted, and whether the information is being stored on the company’s servers.

The Wall Street Journal has tested the feature on an iPhone with its Location Services turned off, and discovered that the location data is still recorded despite the setting, although the coordinates recorded were not from the exact locations the phone traveled, which is consistent with prior results. Finally, Mac Rumors reports that a reader emailed Apple CEO Steve Jobs about the issue, saying, “Could you please explain the necessity of the passive location-tracking tool embedded in my iPhone? It’s kind of unnerving knowing that my exact location is being recorded at all times. Maybe you could shed some light on this for me before I switch to a Droid. They don’t track me.” Jobs responded in his typically terse style, saying, “Oh yes they do. We don’t track anyone. The info circulating around is false.” While it is obvious that iOS 4 devices are indeed tracking and recording users’ locations, it’s possible Jobs was referring to the fact that the data does not appear to be collected by Apple, thus supporting Jobs’ “we don’t track anyone” claim.

Apple already signing deals for cloud music service?

Apple has already secured deals with two of the four big music labels for its upcoming cloud-based music service, according to a new report. Citing anonymous sources, AllThingsD reports that the first two deals were signed within the last two months, and that Apple’s Vice President of iTunes Eddy Cue will be in New York today to try and finalize the remaining deals. “They’ve been very aggressive and thoughtful about it,” said one industry executive. “It feels like they want to go pretty soon.” The report also states that the general idea of the service is for Apple to let customers store songs they’ve purchased from the iTunes Store, as well as other songs stored on their hard drives, for listening across multiple devices; it adds that the deals Apple is signing will let it store a single master copy of a song on its servers for sharing with multiple users, while Amazon’s service works much more like an external hard drive. The report gave no clues as to when Apple might launch the service, although prior reports have stated it could launch as early as June.

Apple releases iBooks 1.2.2, brings bug fixes

image

Apple has released iBooks 1.2.2, the latest version of its e-Reader software for iOS. According to the company’s release notes, version 1.2.2 addresses issues playing video included with enhanced books from the iBookstore, resolves a problem where some books open with a different font than expected, makes iBooks more responsive when navigating books with many items in their table of contents, and other “important stability and performance improvements.” iBooks 1.2.2 requires iOS 3.2 or later and is available now as a free download from the App Store.

Samsung countersues Apple over the iPhone, iPad

image

Following Apple’s filing of a lawsuit against Samsung in the U.S., Samsung has countersued the company, claiming infringement on 10 mobile technology patents by the iPhone and iPad. Samsung filed the suits in its home country of South Korea, Japan, and Germany, and said the patents involve power reduction during data transmission, 3G technology for reducing errors while transmitting data, and wireless data communication technology, according to Reuters. “Samsung is responding actively to the legal action taken against us in order to protect our intellectual property and to ensure our continued innovation and growth in the mobile communications business,” the company said in a statement. During the company’s Second Quarter 2010 Financial Results Conference Call, Apple COO Tim Cook addressed the lawsuit against Samsung, saying that Apple is Samsung’s biggest customer and considers them a valued component supplier, and that he expects their strong relationship to continue despite the lawsuit.

Report: Apple cloud music service set to launch

Apple has “completed work” on its cloud-based music storage service and is set to launch it ahead of a competing service from Google, according to a new report. Citing two people familiar with both companies’ plans, Reuters reports that the new service will allow iTunes customers to store their songs on a remote server, and access them from anywhere they have an Internet connection. The report adds that Apple has yet to sign any new licenses for the service and that the major music labels are hoping to secure deals ahead of the service’s launch, although they have not yet been told when that will be. Apple has reportedly been working on the music service for some time, which may or may not be tied into a revamp of MobileMe.

Sign up for the iLounge Weekly Newsletter

Email:

iLounge is an independent resource for all things iPod, iPhone, iPad, and beyond.
iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, Apple TV, Mac, and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc.
iLounge is © 2001 - 2014 iLounge, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy