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Jobs films: Kutcher pic delayed, Funny or Die makes movie

The Steve Jobs biopic starring Ashton Kutcher — “Jobs,” formerly titled “jOBS,”— has been delayed, with no new release date determined as of yet. “Jobs” debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in late January, and was originally slated to hit theaters April 19.

Meanwhile, comedy website Funny or Die announced its own Steve Jobs movie, “iSteve,” will be released online April 15, before “Jobs.” A report describes “iSteve” as “a biopic poking fun at biopics. Starring Justin Long as Steve Jobs, the “very silly” movie is 60 to 75 minutes long. That leaves Aaron Sorkin’s Jobs movie, based on Walter Isaacson’s officially authorized biography and said to consist of three scenes, likely to arrive third. [via The Hollywood Reporter, The New York Times]

Apple unveils new ‘Why iPhone’ webpage

Apple has created a new page on its site extolling the benefits of owning an iPhone, a somewhat surprising move for the company. Following Samsung’s unveiling of its new Galaxy S 4 smartphone, the new page popped up on Apple’s site, starting with the text, “There’s iPhone. And then there’s everything else.” The page touts the virtues of the device’s aluminum design, Retina display, battery life, A6 chip, LTE, iSight camera, and Siri, in addition to Apple’s iTunes, App Store, iOS 6, iCloud, and technical support. Apple’s introduction of this new page follows comparatively brief recent comments from Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller about the advantages iPhones have over Android phones, and suggests that Apple is now facing stronger competitive pressure than before.

THX sues Apple over speaker technology

THX has sued Apple alleging an infringement of speaker technology in iPhones, iPads and iMacs, according to a report. A complaint filed by THX refers to a 2008 patent for a narrow profile speaker unit that can attach to computers or flat screen TVs and output sound through a slot with a narrow dimension. The lawsuit maintains Apple products containing the speaker units infringe the patent and cause THX “monetary damage and irreparable harm.” THX seeks a court order to stop the infringement, and a royalty or damages to compensate for lost profit. [via Bloomberg]

Ex-Apple retail chief Browett: Apple’s great, I didn’t fit

Former Apple retail chief John Browett said he “just didn’t fit” the company in a recent interview at the Retail Week Live conference. Browett left Apple in late October after a brief stint with the company. “Apple is a truly fantastic business. The people are great, they’ve got great products, it’s got a great culture and I loved working there, it’s a fantastic business. The issue there was that I just didn’t fit within the way they run the business … you are rejected from the organization for fit rather than competency,” he said. However, Browett also noted what he learned during his time at Apple was “probably the best thing that’s ever happened to me, certainly from a business perspective,” suggesting that he learned humility and became a “much kinder person” as a result. Browett is now chief executive of London-based retailer Monsoon Accessorize. [via The Independent]

Apple’s Schiller downplays Android before Galaxy IV debut

Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller had choice words for Android on the eve of competitor Samsung’s launch of the Galaxy IV. “Android is often given as a free replacement for a feature phone and the experience isn’t as good as an iPhone,” Schiller said in an interview. He downplayed the competition, saying that four times as many iPhone users switched from Android than those who switched to Android in the fourth quarter. Schiller also said Android users often run old operating systems and don’t have the benefits of the cohesive experience that Apple offers. “When you take an Android device out of the box, you have to sign up to nine accounts with different vendors to get the experience iOS comes with,” he said. “They don’t work seamlessly together.” [via The Wall Street Journal]

Patent application shows Smart Cover inductive charging

A newly published patent application reveals Apple’s designs for a Smart Cover that uses inductive charging to wirelessly power an iPad. The protective cover described in the application could “wirelessly pass power to a corresponding inductive power receiver unit disposed within the tablet device” by coupling magnetic elements. It’s also noted that “useful power can be supplied directly to a tablet device by way of a protective cover that can be placed in close proximity to a surface of the tablet device.”

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The protective cover could use a battery or inductive coils powered by an external supply. A Smart Cover battery would need to be charged normally, but other embodiments recognize the possibility for solar cells to gather power for inductive transfer. [via Apple Insider]

Apple CEO Cook forced to testify in e-book case

Apple CEO Tim Cook must sit for a deposition in the U.S. government’s antitrust lawsuit against Apple for alleged e-book price-fixing, according to a new report. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote granted a Justice Department request for Cook to testify for four hours. Apple had argued that Cook’s testimony would be “cumulative and duplicative” due to the depositions of 11 other Apple executives, but the Judge held that Cook should be made available for testimony, as there was no opportunity for live testimony from Apple’s late former CEO Steve Jobs. The lawsuit dates back to April, and initially targeted a number of publishers — Apple was the only publisher not to settle charges in the suit. A trial is currently set for June. Apple and other publishers settled an e-book EU antitrust investigation in September. [via Reuters]

Apple adds new flyovers, updated directions to Maps

Apple is updating its iOS Maps “often and significantly,” according to a new report. Flyover support was added to numerous cities in recent months, and other cities have seen flyover coverage and 3-D buildings expanded. Some city labels, satellite imagery in numerous countries, and location information have also been updated.

The map content was also recently updated in Japan, with toll road notifications, improved pronunciation during turn-by-turn navigation, updated icons and labels, and added 3-D buildings. Maps in China has a new coloring scheme, updated roads, re-prioritized locations, and a new character font for improved readability.

A full list of cities recently updated is included below. However, it’s notable that not all users might see the updates as of yet; for instance, Buffalo, NY supposedly now has flyover support, but the app doesn’t appear to show anything new. [via The Loop]

Apple social network patent tracks ‘stalkers,’ ‘spammers’

A patent granted to Apple today details a social networking system that can reliably identify friends, as well as “stalkers” and “spammers.” Under the system, a user with a relationship to another user can enter a “friend state.” However, rejections of friend requests increase a user’s “stalker count” — a user rejected a number of times within a specified time period will no longer be able to make a friend request to that same user. Likewise, a “spammer count” is created by limiting the number of friend requests one user can make within a specified time period, making it possible to prevent additional friend requests for the remainder of the time period. [via Apple Insider]

Apple must reveal secret documents in privacy lawsuit

A judge has ruled that Apple must submit “a detailed account of how it collects and evaluates” documents in a recent privacy lawsuit, according to a report. Plaintiffs’ attorneys claim Apple has withheld documents it was required to produce in a lawsuit that alleges Apple collected data from mobile devices without permission. U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul S. Grewal wrote that Apple “had provided more than enough evidence itself to suggest to the court that it has not fully complied with the court’s order.” The report notes the judge’s orders are forcing Apple to “reveal inner workings that the company normally goes to great lengths to hide.” Grewal’s order will also allow plaintiffs’ attorneys to view documents regarding how Apple reviews applications for mobile devices — according to a court filing, Apple redacted the information because it is “incredibly sensitive and valuable and is a closely guarded trade secret.” Apple has yet to comment on the order. [via Bloomberg]

Report: Apple’s low royalty offer stalls music streaming

Apple’s proposed streaming music service is being held up by the company’s low offer for royalty rates, according to the New York Post. Sources said Apple has offered record labels around 6 cents per 100 songs streamed, about half of what Pandora offers: 12 cents per 100 songs streamed. A December report noted that progress was slow in talks between Apple and record labels, but no further details were given. While the new report notes that labels would love to open up a new revenue stream via Apple, the offer is seen as too low. Some insiders suggest Apple should pay the rate set by the Copyright Royalty Board, which is around 21 cents per 100 songs streamed.

A related report from The New York Times notes that licensing negotiations will likely delay the launch of Apple’s proposed service until the summer. It’s believed that Apple will pre-load an app on iOS devices for the Pandora-style service, which will be supported through iAds.

Apple patent filing suggests digital content loans, resales

A recently published Apple patent filing titled “Managing Access to Digital Content Items” reveals details about the possible user-to-user transfer of digital content, such as books, music or movies found in iTunes. The most recent of three patent applications involving such transfers, filed in June, describes a system that would allow one user at a time to access a digital content item. A user who purchases a digital content item can loan the item or resell it, with part of the proceeds from the “resale” going to the original digital publisher or creator. In either case, the digital rights to access the content are also transferred. It’s also possible that the loaned or resold content could be stored remotely, in the cloud, removing the need for a seller or lender to send digital content directly to a buyer. [via Apple Insider]

Apple wins UK 3G patent ruling over Samsung

Apple has won a court ruling over Samsung in the UK over the use of standard essential 3G patents. Judge Christopher Floyd ruled Apple’s products do not infringe Samsung patents that apply to sending and receiving information from devices on a 3G network. While Samsung hopes to claim roughly 2.5 percent royalties on sales of Apple 3G products, each Apple court win makes that claim more unlikely. Samsung expressed disappointment with the result, as a company spokeswoman said it would determine whether an appeal would be filed. Apple declined comment. [via ZDNet]

Apple asks judge to dismiss app monopoly suit

Apple has asked a federal judge to dismiss a consumer lawsuit regarding an iPhone app monopoly. Filed in 2011, the suit alleges Apple maintains a monopoly because the App Store is the only place to buy iOS apps. “There’s nothing illegal about creating a system that is closed in a sense,” Apple attorney Dan Wall said during a court hearing Tuesday. While the suit claims customers are forced to pay what developers charge for applications at the App Store, Wall argued that Apple doesn’t set prices, and that charging a price for distribution doesn’t violate antitrust laws. [via Bloomberg]

Report: Apple, Beats talk streaming music service

Apple has discussed a potential partnership with Beats Electronics involving Beats’ planned “Project Daisy” music subscription service. According to a report, Apple CEO Tim Cook and Senior Vice President Eddy Cue met with Beats CEO Jimmy Iovine about the service. Held in late February, the meeting covered a variety of music-related topics, and Cook “expressed interest in Daisy’s business model and its rollout plans,” sources said, but he and Iovine “did not discuss specifics of a deal.” Prior reports have indicated that Apple is interested in launching its own streaming radio service, and Iovine recently noted that he had previously discussed a plan with former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, possibly in an effort to encourage the company to strike a new deal. Both Apple and Beats declined comment. [via Reuters]

Ferrari, Apple talk in-car entertainment partnership

Ferrari is currently talking with Apple about “broadening a partnership on in-car entertainment,” Ferrari Chairman Luca Cordero Di Montezemolo said today at the Geneva Motor Show. Di Montezemolo said Ferrari will be “more precise” about its partnership with Apple in the coming months, according to a Bloomberg report; a related press release from Ferrari notes that the company’s FF model “is also now seamlessly integrated with Apple technologies, thanks to direct access to the infotainment system via Siri voice commands and the adoption of two iPad Minis as the entertainment system of choice for the rear seat passengers.” Apple Senior Vice President Eddy Cue notably joined Ferrari’s board of directors last year.

Dev opens Lightning Digital AV Adapter, finds CPU, issues

Apple’s Lightning Digital AV Adapter contains previously undiscovered video processing hardware, according to developer Panic, which performed a teardown of the accessory after noting video quality issues. In testing output from an application, Panic found that the video resolution was below 1080p, and noted that compression artifacts were showing up on screen. The company discovered an ARM processor inside the adapter, and suggested that Lightning iOS devices are using a protocol similar to AirPlay to encode video before sending it to the accessory for decoding. While the presence of the processor hints at the reason the Digital AV Adapter arrived at a surprisingly high $49 price, the video degradation was a disappointment, particularly considering the prior Dock Connector version’s output capabilities.

Notably, a comment posted by an anonymous Apple employee on Panic’s blog confirmed the findings above, and attempted to explain them. “We didn’t do this to screw the customer,” the commenter said. “We did this to specifically shift the complexity of the ‘adapter’ bit into the adapter itself, leaving the host hardware free of any concerns in regards to what was hanging off the other end of the Lightning cable.” The commenter also noted that the video quality limitations may only be temporary. “Certain people are aware that the quality could be better and others are working on it. For the time being, the quality was deemed to be suitably acceptable… updates **will** be made available as a part of future iOS updates. When this will happen I can’t say for anonymous reasons, but these concerns haven’t gone unnoticed.” [via Panic Blog]

Reports: Apple hopes for 2013 iWatch debut, 4-5 day battery

“Apple seeks to introduce [its iWatch] as soon as this year,” according to a new report from Bloomberg. The report follows comments from Corning, Apple’s glass-making partner for iOS devices, that its upcoming flexible Willow glass would likely not be used in any device released in the next three years; if both are accurate, the first-generation product could use a curved screen, but the screen would not be flexible.

Citing a person familiar with the company’s plans, Bloomberg reports that iWatch “features under consideration” include making calls, identifying incoming callers, and checking map coordinates; a pedometer and health sensor for data such as heart rate would also be included. The report notes that Apple “has filed at least 79 patent applications that include the word ‘wrist,’ including one for a device with a flexible screen, powered by kinetic energy,” and that Apple design chief Jony Ive “has long had an interest in watches,” having his team visit watch factories, and ordering boxes of a Nike sports watch in the mid-2000s.

A follow-on report from The Verge claims that Apple has decided to use iOS to power the watch, which has led to “battery life issues in development,” with prototypes running for “a couple days max.” The company reportedly hopes to get the battery “to last at least 4-5 days between charges.”

Apple’s $1.05B award from Samsung cut by $440M

Apple’s award of $1.05 billion in damages from Samsung was reduced by more than 40 percent by Judge Lucy Koh today, according to a tweet from The Recorder reporter Vanessa Blum. Koh has reportedly ordered a new damages trial on the $440 million removed from the award. Apple was initially awarded the $1.05 billion in August after a jury found Samsung violated Apple patents. [via Apple Insider]

Kid spends $2,500 in 15 minute in-app purchase spree

Apple has offered a refund to the family of Danny Kitchen, a British boy who spent £1,700 (about $2,550) of his parents’ money on in-app purchases in an iPad game within 15 minutes. The family believed the boy was downloading “a free game,” and entered a password for the download, which was followed by a collection of huge in-app purchases. Apple recently settled a class action lawsuit regarding freemium apps aimed at children, offering refunds for claims that minors made in-app purchases without parental knowledge or permission. [via BBC]

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