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Apple releases iBooks 1.1 for iPad, iPhone, iPod touch

Apple has released iBooks 1.1, the first major update to its e-Book reading and purchasing software for iOS devices. As revealed by Apple in its WWDC keynote address, iBooks 1.1 offers compatibility with the iPad as well as any iPhone or iPod touch running iOS 4, and features several noteworthy improvements, including PDF support, the ability to highlight text, add notes, and bookmark, the latter two of which are reflected in the book’s Table of Contents, wireless syncing of notes, highlights, and page position between devices, and, interestingly, support for iTunes Digital Booklet files once they’ve been marked as a Book in iTunes. iBooks 1.1 is available now as a free download from the App Store.

Apple releases iOS 4 for iPhone, iPod touch

Apple has released iOS 4 for the second- and third-generation iPod touch, iPhone 3G, and iPhone 3GS. The fourth major release of Apple’s mobile device operating system—previously called iPhone OS—the new software provides over 100 new features or enhancements, according to Apple. Among these are multitasking, folders, customizable backgrounds for the Home screen, a unified inbox for the Mail application, more fine-grained control over Location Services, support for Apple’s new iAd mobile advertising platform, and support for iBooks 1.1 on the iPhone and iPod touch. Several of the features—most notably multitasking—require more advanced hardware and are therefore only available on the iPhone 3GS and third-generation iPod touch, as well as future devices such as the iPhone 4. Interestingly, iLounge editors have seen a dialog box experienced when updating a second-generation iPod touch, warning not to “interrupt the update, which may take an hour or longer to complete” that was not seen when upgrading an iPhone 3GS. The iOS 4 update for the second-generation iPod touch weighs in at 315.0MB, the iPhone 3G update is 292.1MB, the third-generation iPod touch download is 366.4MB, and the iPhone 3GS version is 378.0MB. iOS 4 for the iPhone and iPod touch is available for download now via the update feature in iTunes, and will be coming to the iPad this fall.

Update: iOS 4 for the iPhone 4 is a 579.3MB download, more than 200MB larger than any of the other iOS 4 install bundles.

Apple sneaks iAd opt-out into iTunes Store update

Apple has made “material” changes to its iTunes privacy policy, including a section related to the company’s upcoming iAd mobile advertising platform that gives users the option of opting out of the service. “Apple and its partners use cookies and other technologies in mobile advertising services to control the number of times you see a given ad, deliver ads that relate to your interests, and measure the effectiveness of ad campaigns,” the text says. “If you do not want to receive ads with this level of relevance on your mobile device, you can opt out by accessing the following link on your device: http://oo.apple.com. If you opt out, you will continue to receive the same number of mobile ads, but they may be less relevant because they will not be based on your interests. You may still see ads related to the contrent on a web page or in an application or based on other non-personal information. This opt-out applies only to Apple advertising services and does not affect interest-based advertising from other advertising networks.” Notably, the opt out must be performed from the device, and if a user has multiple devices, each must be opted out separately. Apple is expected to roll out its iAd platform to iOS 4 devices beginning July 1.

Report: Apple’s share of U.S. mobile ad requests declines

According to the latest data from Millennial Media (PDF Link), Apple’s share of overall U.S. mobile device ad impressions is on the decline. In May, Apple devices accounted for around 25% of all impressions, down sharply from 35% the month before. The report gives no indication as to whether Apple’s changes to the iOS developer agreement, which banned the sharing of user and device data with third party ad networks and analytics tools, had any affect on the results. Also of interest in the report is a new section on mobile developer trends. The report claims that 90% of all U.S. developers are single-platform, with 56% of those focused on iOS development, followed by 29% that are focused on Andoid. Millennial Media’s numbers are based on impressions served on its network of mobile sites and apps, which reaches 82% of the U.S. mobile audience, according to the company.

Apple asks FCC for iPhone 4 confidentiality

In a letter to the FCC dated shorty prior to the company’s official unveiling of the iPhone 4, Apple asked the regulatory body (PDF Link) for a 45-day confidentiality window on certain documents. Specifically, the test setup photographs, external photographs, internal photographs, and the user manual. In the letter, Apple says that “although Apple has begun to market the device publicly, these documents reveal technical and design information that has not been publicly disclosed in such marketing and that is protected by Apple as confidential and proprietary trade secrets.” As is standard practice, Apple in the same letter requested permanent confidentiality for more sensitive documents, including schematics for the applications processor, cellular radio, and Wi-Fi + Bluetooth. [via Patently Apple]

Apple updates MobileMe, brings new Mail, navigation

Last night Apple rolled out a number of updates to its MobileMe service. Most notably, the company brought its enhanced MobileMe webmail application out of beta, giving the web app a more iPad-like interface. Improvements include widescreen and compact views, the ability to use mail rules to automate organization, faster performance, support for sending mail from a different, non MobileMe address, and improved junk mail filtering. Also new is the navigation screen, which replaces the old row of icons at the top of the page with a single cloud icon. When clicked, or when evoked using the key combination of Shift-Esc, it brings up a Mac OS X-like application switcher that lets the user move between applications. These updates join the new Find My iPhone application, which was launched alongside the updates.

Apple releases Find My iPhone app

Following a recent update to its MobileMe service, Apple has released Find My iPhone for iPhone, iPod touch and iPad devices. A native app for the web-based service, Find My iPhone can be installed on any device running iOS 3.1.3 or later and assists users in locating another lost or missing iPhone, iPod touch or iPad that is using the MobileMe service. Users simply sign in with the MobileMe member name associated with the missing device and the Find My iPhone app provides an integrated map to show where the lost device last reported its location. Users can then display a message and/or play a sound on the remote device, remotely lock the device with a passcode or wipe the device completely in the same way as through the MobileMe web-based Find My iPhone service. Note that the Find My iPhone service must already have been enabled on the missing device in order for the app to locate it. Find My iPhone is a universal app that runs natively on iPhone, iPod touch and iPad devices and is a free download from the App Store, although a $99/year MobileMe subscription is required to use the Find My iPhone service.

 

Apple releases iTunes 9.2, brings iOS 4, iPhone 4 support

Apple has released iTunes 9.2, the latest update to its media management software. According to Apple’s release notes, iTunes 9.2 includes support for iPhone 4 and iOS 4, as well as the ability to organize and sync books to iPhones and iPod touch units with iBooks 1.1, support for iBooks PDF management, the ability to create and manage iOS 4 home screen folders from within iTunes, album art speed improvements, and faster backups when syncing a device running iOS 4. iTunes 9.2 is available now via Apple’s Software Update utility or as a direct download from apple.com/itunes.

Apple online iPhone 4 pre-orders slide again to July 14

Only hours after Apple sold through its initial allotment of iPhone 4 units, pushing the ship date on new pre-orders back from the device’s June 24 launch date to July 2, the company has been forced to push new pre-orders back even further. According to the company’s online store, new iPhone 4 pre-orders will now ship by July 14, nearly two weeks later than orders placed just earlier today. Apple announced earlier that it and its carrier partners took more than 600,000 pre-orders for the iPhone 4 units yesterday, saying it was “the largest number of pre-orders Apple has ever taken in a single day,” while apologizing for “order and approval system malfunctions” that left many potential customers unable to order their chosen device. [via Mac Rumors]

iPhone 4 order issues persist, Apple phone reps powerless

With more than eight elapsed hours since Apple began accepting iPhone 4 pre-orders, both the company and AT&T continue to experience serious server issues that are leaving a large number of angry customers unable to pre-order devices online. Additionally, call times on Apple’s telephone lines are so long that the company’s phone systems are in some cases turning away callers; one iLounge editor spent three hours on hold before being told that the phone-based customer service agents are using the same system as online customers, and thus have no way to resolve the problems. iLounge has been told that both companies are working to fix the issues, and the representative we spoke with was hopeful the issues would be resolved within a few hours. The problems, for which Apple and AT&T have not apologized, began with the unexpected last-minute unavailability of white iPhone 4 devices, an issue that now seems trivial in light of the massive system failures that have blocked orders of other models as well.

Apple developer video takes shots at Android

A brief Apple-produced video that highlights Apple’s iOS development tools—while taking veiled shots at Google’s Android OS—has been posted online. The video, presumably made for use at the company’s WWDC conference, features a number of notable developers talking about their experience developing for iOS, as well as other platforms. “We’ve actually spent some time working with other platforms,” said Calvin Carter of Bottle Rocket. “It’s a night and day difference. They’re more difficult for the user. They don’t have the power or the tools available. They don’t have the distribution network. They don’t have the standards, both in hardware or in software.” Later, Tom Conrad of Pandora added, “It’s really evident in Apple’s APIs, in the developer tools, that you’re working with something really mature, not something that was invented two years ago.” The full video is available for viewing on YouTube or can be seen in embedded form below. [via Fortune]

Apple launches Apple Store app for iPhone

Coinciding with the problematic launch of pre-orders for the iPhone 4, Apple has launched an official, free Apple Store application formatted for the iPhone and iPod touch, but also compatible with the iPad. The application is designed to let customers “buy Apple products and accessories, read customer reviews, find an Apple Retail Store, stay up to date with in-store events, and make Personal Shopping, Genius Bar, or On to One appointments,” and is billed as “the easiest way to buy or reserve your new iPhone—right from your current iPhone.” It also uses push notifications to provide updates for as yet unknown purposes.

 

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Like the Apple Store web site, the application’s main screen currently displays a “We’ll be back soon” post it note graphic, seemingly related to the iPhone 4 ordering outage currently affecting the Store. Screenshots show the application offering five bottom-of-screen buttons to toggle between Featured, Products, Stores, Search, and Cart screens that are not yet available. This is Apple’s fourth separate selling app for iOS devices, following iTunes, App Store, and iBookstore within the iBooks application.

 

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Update: The Apple Store app became functional shortly after 9:30AM. It notably offers iPhone 4 pre-ordering only for existing iPhone customers who wish to replace current iPhones with iPhone 4 models, and only reservations for customers who intend to create new accounts or add lines.

iPhone 4, 8GB iPhone 3GS pre-orders open, minus white [updated]

Apple has officially opened pre-orders for the $199 16GB and $299 32GB versions of iPhone 4, formally announced last week at the Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, CA, as well as the new 8GB version of iPhone 3GS priced at $99. As of 4:00AM ET/1:00AM PT, customers may pre-order the new iPhone models for at-home delivery on June 24, 2010, or reserve the phone for in-store pick-up on that day at a local Apple retail store. Existing customers merely need to go through a quick process to determine upgrade eligibility for pricing, and may preserve their prior unlimited data plans or choose new $15/$25/$45 (tethering) options; new customers have to wait for the results of an online credit check, and may only choose between AT&T’s new, limited data plans. The early morning U.S. pre-order opening time appears to coincide with the start of the day in the United Kingdom, one of five initial countries where the new iPhones are becoming available.

 

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Surprisingly, Apple’s web site does not offer pre-orders or reservations for the white iPhone 4 model, describing this color as “currently unavailable.” Late-breaking reports from third-party retailers suggested that merchants other than Apple would not have white iPhone 4 hardware available at launch; the fact that Apple itself is not yet offering the white version is unusual given its track record of immediately selling whatever colors it has pre-announced.

Update: Additional international pricing has been announced for U.K. and French iPhone 4 users: Apple is selling iPhone 4 units at unlocked prices of £499 (16GB) and £599 (32GB) in the United Kingdom, with French prices at €629 (16GB) and €739 (32GB). Quick checks of Apple’s foreign pages show additional restrictions on model availability outside of the United States, with German stores having no 32GB models at all, regardless of color, and only black 16GB units to pre-order.

Apple relaxes policy on interpreted code in iOS apps

Apple has updated its iPhone Developer Program License Agreement to allow for a more relaxed stance on interpreted code inside apps. Section 3.3.2 of the agreement previously stated that “[n]o interpreted code may be downloaded or used in an Application except for code that is interpreted and run by Apple’s Documented APIs and built-in interpreter(s).” The new revised version notes that with Apple’s prior written consent, “[a]n Application may use embedded interpreted code in a limited way if such use is solely for providing minor features or functionality that are consistent with the intended and advertised purpose of the Application.” The new terms should open the door for a number of possibilites for developers, including for games to use third-party rendering engines and libraries.

FTC to launch probe of Apple’s mobile business

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission is set to launch an investigation to determine if Apple’s business practices in the mobile space are unjustly limiting competition, according to a new report. Citing people familiar with the matter, the Wall Street Journal reports that the investigation is the result of “weeks” of negotiations with the Justice Department over which body would look into allegations that companies are being shut-out of Apple’s newest computing platforms. It cites as examples Apple’s ongoing feud with Adobe over Flash on the iOS, Google’s complaints relating to Apple’s decision to effectively bar AdMob from its iOS devices, and it position on cross-platform development solutions. According to the report, this new investigation may be handled independently of other probes of Apple’s business, including the Justice Department’s probe into Apple’s digital music and media business.

Apple releases iTunes Connect Mobile App

Apple has released iTunes Connect Mobile, a new iPhone and iPod touch app designed to allow developers to access their sales and trend data from the iTunes Store directly on their devices. iTunes Connect Mobile allows users to view daily and weekly sales data related to application updates, paid apps, free apps, and In-App purchases. Although iTunes Connect Mobile provides sales numbers in terms of actual downloads, this version does not provide any reporting on more detailed information available from iTunes Connect such as actual dollar revenue, sales history, chart positions or customer reviews. iTunes Connect Mobile is available from the App Store as a free download.

New iPhone 4 HD hands-on videos posted

iLounge has posted a set of two new high-definition hands-on videos of Apple’s iPhone 4 today, one focused on the externals of the new phone by comparison with the original iPhone and iPhone 3GS, and the other on its new software and interface.

The first video is a comparison of the iPhone 4, original iPhone, and iPhone 3GS (YouTube HD link), showing the final, working phone from all angles. It’s also available from Vimeo.

 

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The second video is a full interface video for the iPhone 4 (YouTube HD link), showing off everything from FaceTime to iBooks, iMovie, iOS4 multitasking with the new Pandora application, and the iPhone 4’s other built-in applications. It’s also available from Vimeo.

 

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Both videos are in 720p format.

Apple to face antitrust investigation over AdMob ban

U.S. antitrust regulators are preparing to launch an investigation into Apple’s decision to effectively bar AdMob from its iOS devices. The Financial Times, citing people familiar with the matter, reports that it’s currently unclear whether the Federal Trade Commission or the Justice Department will handle the investigation. Apple recently changed its iOS developer terms to forbid the sharing of user information with “an advertising service provider owned by or affiliated with a developer or distributor of mobile devices, mobile operating systems or development environments other than Apple,” effectively barring AdMob from all iOS applications. Notably, the company also added language that bars third-party analytics services. Apple is already facing antitrust scrutiny from the Justice Department in relation to its digital music business and its blocking of Flash software from its iOS devices.

Apple updates iOS developer terms, bars AdMob

Apple has updated its iOS developer agreement to allow for some sharing of user and device data with third-party advertisers, while effectively banning Google-owned AdMob in the process. AllThingsD reports that in April, Apple changed its developer agreement to ban the sharing of user and device data with third party ad networks and analytics tools, a move that Apple CEO Steve Jobs later said was made in the interest of protecting user privacy, adding that the company might revisit the terms in the future. The new terms allow for the sharing of “UDID, user location data, and other data specifically designated by Apple as available for advertising purposes,” but only when prior user consent has been given, and then in only two circumstances: when the collection, use or disclosure is necessary “in order to provide a service or function that is directly relevant to the user of the Application,” or “is for the purpose of serving advertising” to the application.

Notably, the new terms specify that developers “may not use third party analytics software” to “collect and send device data to a third party for aggregation, processing, or analysis.” They also stipulate that third party advertising is only allowed when the advertising service is “an independent advertising service provider whose primary business is serving mobile ads (for example, an advertising service provider owned by or affiliated with a developer or distributor of mobile devices, mobile operating systems or development environments other than Apple would not qualify as independent).” The new terms appear to ban both AdMob and analytics services such as Flurry, which was singled out in Jobs’ response explaining the initial change.

AdMob founder Omar Hamoui has responded to Apple’s move in a post on AdMob’s blog, saying the changes threaten to “decrease – or even eliminate – revenue that helps to support tens of thousands of developers. The terms hurt both large and small developers by severely limiting their choice of how best to make money.  And because advertising funds a huge number of free and low cost apps, these terms are bad for consumers as well.” He added that the change in terms “is not in the best interests of users or developers,” and said the company would be “speaking to Apple to express our concerns about the impact of these terms.”

Apple hires key Palm webOS engineer Dellinger

Apple has hired Rich Dellinger, a User Interface Design Architect at Palm, as a Senior User Interface Designer. According to Dellinger’s LinkedIn page, he was responsible for creating the “non-intrusive banner notification system used in webOS,” and also “co-developed the Application Framework used by webOS,” including the “CSS structure and defined HTML layout.” This will not be the first time Dellinger has worked at Apple, however, as he originally joined the company in December 1999 as a Senior Technical Support Engineer, before moving his way up to a User Interface Designer position in which he “designed applications for Apple products, including Mac OS X, iPod, and iPhone,” before leaving for Palm in April 2006. [via PreCentral]

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