News | iLounge

News

Apple files motion to intervene in Lodsys suit

Apple has filed a motion to intervene in the patent infringement lawsuit filed by Lodsys against seven third-party iOS developers. FOSS Patents reports that if the court grants Apple’s motion to participate as an intervenor—something the publication feels is “fairly likely”—Apple will have already submitted its answer to Lodsys’ complaint, as well as a counterclaim. The report also notes that while no one has yet confirmed that Apple has agreed to cover those developers’ costs and potential risks, it is unlikely the situation could work in any other manner. In its motion, Apple states that the defendants “are individuals or small entities with far fewer resources than Apple and [...] lack the technical information, ability, and incentive to adequately protect Apple’s rights under its license agreement.”

Apple’s proposed defense against Lodsys is related to the assertion that the alleged infringements are covered by an existing Apple license. Lodsys’ claims are related to the developers’ apps’ use of In-App Purchases and “upgrade” buttons. Interestingly, an unrelated company—ForeSee Results of Michigan—filed a declaratory judgement suit against Lodsys’ four patents earlier this week, seeking to have them invalidated.

Apple replaces stolen iPad for thief, leaves victim hanging

In a new twist on an old problem with stolen Apple devices, a thief successfully convinced the Apple Store to swap a stolen iPad 2 for a new device with a different serial number, after which Apple refused to help the victim of the crime. iLounge reader Dan Chang says that he purchased a black 64GB iPad 2 with Wi-Fi + 3G from the Apple Store Tysons Corner in May, and the device was stolen less than a week later. Chang filed a police report and was told that the iPad’s serial number would show up as a stolen item if sold to a pawn shop. On June 6, Chang used Apple’s Service and Repair tool to check the serial number of the stolen iPad, and received the following message: “We’re sorry, but this is a serial number for a product that has been replaced… If your information is correct, you may need to contact us.”

Chang followed the instructions and contacted Apple Customer Service, providing the company with his serial number. Apple confirmed that the iPad 2 had been replaced at another local Apple Store based on a battery-related complaint, and told Chang to visit the Store in person to discuss the matter. During his visit, the manager told Chang that she was not responsible for his stolen iPad, and told him to call Apple Customer Service, which he had already done.

Again following instructions, Chang was told that the iPad had been “recycled” and was no longer traceable; further, the representative said that Apple was not responsible for the stolen item, and that he should contact the police to try and catch the thief. In the end, Chang ended up without his $870 iPad 2, which he says he will not be replacing with another iPad or any other Apple product. He says he wishes that the thief had taken the stolen iPad to a pawn shop, where at least it could have been reclaimed thanks to the serial number tracking system, instead of to an Apple Store, where it was accepted with no questions asked and with no recourse available to the victim. The absence of a simple online Apple tool enabling users to report the loss or theft of their devices is at least partially to blame for this problem.

Apple removes restrictions on In-App Purchases, Subscriptions

In another change to its App Store Review Guidelines, Apple has removed several widely criticized restrictions it put in place with the launch of In-App Subscriptions, according to a Mac Rumors report. Perhaps most importantly, the new terms no longer demand that any content or subscriptions sold outside an app must also be available via In-App Purchase for the same or lower price. The prior text of section 11.13 read: “Apps can read or play approved content (magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, video) that is sold outside of the app, for which Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues, provided that the same content is also offered in the app using IAP at the same price or less than it is offered outside the app. This applies to both purchased content and subscriptions.” The decision to attempt to control pricing outside third-party apps drew the ire of many companies, some of which threatened to leave the App Store altogether should they have gone into effect on June 30 as expected.

Section 11.13 has since been replaced by section 11.14, which reads: “Apps can read or play approved content (specifically magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, and video) that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app, as long as there is no button or external link in the app to purchase the approved content. Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues for approved content that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app.” This is a significant change in policy, and should help encourage more publishers and media companies to release offerings for iOS.

Apple moves to block DUI checkpoint apps

Apple has revised its App Store Review Guidelines to prevent the approval of any new DUI checkpoint apps. According to Autoblog, Section 22.8 of the new Guidelines states, “Apps which contain DUI checkpoints that are not published by law enforcement agencies, or encourage and enable drunk driving, will be rejected.” The update follows growing interest from the U.S. government in such apps, including a letter sent to Apple asking the company to remove any apps that inform users of DUI checkpoints. As noted in the report, while the developers of such apps might be able to remove DUI-specific functionality, most apps that identify law enforcement areas and speed traps are crowd-sourced, and it may therefore be quite difficult to stop users from submitting checkpoints themselves without the developers’ knowledge.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs outlines plans for new HQ

During the Cupertino City Council Meeting yesterday, Apple CEO Steve Jobs gave a presentation outlining the company’s plans for a new headquarters. The headquarters, which Jobs referred to as a “spaceship,” would be placed on the former Hewlett-Packard campus purchased by the company last year, and would be completely circular, with a courtyard in the center. According to Jobs, there wouldn’t be a single piece of flat glass used in the building; it would instead be built from curved architectural glass, of the same kind the company used to build the cylindrical glass entrance to its Shanghai retail store. The building would feature underground parking, a cafe capable of feeding 3,000 people per sitting, and would house 12,000 employees. Jobs referred to the structure as having the potential to be the “best office building in the world.”

 

image

Apart from the main building, the surrounding land would be heavily rebalanced in favor of green areas and away from asphalt; Jobs said the site is currently 20% landscape, and Apple’s plan would make it 80% landscape, moving from 3,700 on-site trees to roughly 6,000, the latter including some apricot orchards. Other buildings included in the plan are a separate, second parking structure, an energy center which would use primarily natural gas and other power sources, and rely on the grid for backup, an auditorium, a fitness center, and separate testing buildings. Between the company’s existing campus and the new headquarters, Apple could keep 15,000 employees in Cupertino. Jobs said that the company would like to submit plans for the site as quickly as possible, break ground in 2012, and move in to the new headquarters by 2015. A video of Jobs’ presentation is available on YouTube and is embedded below. [via ifoAppleStore]

Apple releases iTunes 10.3.1

Apple has released iTunes 10.3.1, the latest version of its digital media management software. The purpose of the update, which arrived without version-specific release notes, is unknown; the prior version, 10.3, was announced during the company’s keynote address on Monday but was not made available for download until early yesterday morning. iTunes 10.3.1 is available now via Apple’s Software Update utility.

Apple releases iBooks 1.3 with read-aloud feature

Apple has released iBooks 1.3, the latest version of its e-Reader software for iOS. According to Apple’s release notes, iBooks 1.3 adds support for a new read-aloud feature for younger children that’s included in select children’s books from the iBookstore. The feature uses a real narrator to read the book to you and/or your child, and in some books, will highlight the words as its reading them aloud. Other features include automatic audio or video playback in enhanced books, improved responsiveness when opening very long books, and a fix for an issue where some books may display the same page twice. iBooks 1.3 is available now as a free download from the App Store.

Apple to MobileMe users: free* service to June 2012, then lights out

In an e-mail just sent to MobileMe members, Apple confirmed what many users have expected since rumors of a follow-up service began to spread: MobileMe as it’s currently known will cease to exist after June 30, 2012. As a goodwill gesture to current users, the company will automatically extend MobileMe subscriptions through June 30, 2012 “at no additional charge,” after which “MobileMe will no longer be available.” Attempts to purchase additional MobileMe service are being rejected and refunded by the company as of today.

Apple urges users to sign up for the just-announced iCloud in order to keep their MobileMe e-mail addresses, mail, contacts, calendars, and bookmarks, and re-confirms that iCloud will be free for iOS 5 and OS X Lion users. While the company does not specifically address what will happen to MobileMe’s iDisk, Gallery, and iWeb services, it states that “more details and instructions on how to make the move” will be shared when iCloud opens for business this fall.

Apple posts iOS 5, WWDC 2011 Keynote Address videos

image

Apple has posted the complete video from today’s WWDC Keynote Address. At nearly two hours long, the video shows Apple CEO Steve Jobs and other company executives discussing Mac OS X Lion, iOS 5, and iCloud. Apple has also posted a brief five-minute video highlighting the new features of iOS 5, including Notification Center, Reminders, Safari, and iMessage. Both videos are available for viewing now on Apple’s website.

Readers: Your chance to comment on today’s iOS 5 + iCloud news

We’ve posted a huge collection of news stories regarding all of Apple’s iOS 5 and iCloud announcements today, and wanted to give you all an opportunity to discuss everything in one central location in advance of our editorial on the topic.

 

image

Did Apple impress you with the collection of features added to iOS 5? Are you excited or glad to hear about the free services coming in iCloud? Was anything really important missing today? Sound off in the comments section below.

Apple unveils $25/year iTunes Match service

As part of its new iCloud service suite, Apple today unveiled iTunes in the Cloud, a service which allows users to download previously purchased iTunes music to all devices at no additional cost. For music that wasn’t purchased from iTunes, users can gain the same benefits by signing up for a service called iTunes Match. iTunes Match scans a user’s existing music library and replaces existing tracks with 256 kbps AAC DRM-free files if they can be matched to the over 18 million songs on the iTunes Store and will upload any tracks that it can’t match to Apple’s servers. Apple indicated during its keynote address that there will not be any limit to the number of tracks that can be used with the service. iTunes Match will be available this fall for a $24.99 annual fee.

Update: Apple has updated its website to indicate that iTunes Match will be limited 25,000 songs, but that any purchases made from the iTunes Store don’t count against the limit.

Apple intros iCloud service, coming with iOS 5

Apple today introduced its new iCloud service suite. As a replacement for the company’s previous MobileMe service, iCloud is completely free, and works to store content in the cloud and automatically and wirelessly push it to all a user’s devices. Features of iCloud include rewritten push Contacts, Calendar, and Mail services, automatic synchronization of purchases and downloads from the App Store, iBookstore, and iTunes Store, a Backup features that automatically and securely backs up iOS devices on a daily basis over Wi-Fi, a Photo Stream service that automatically uploads photos taken or imported on any iOS device and pushes them to all a user’s devices—including Apple TV. iCloud also includes 5GB of free storage for mail, documents, and backup, which also serves to seamlessly store all a user’s documents that are created using iCloud Storage APIs, and automatically push them to all that user’s devices. iCloud will be available this fall concurrent with iOS 5 and will be free for all users.

WWDC 2011 Keynote play-by-play transcript now available

We’ve just posted the full chronological transcript of our play-by-play from the WWDC 2011 Keynote. If you haven’t seen the separate news stories yet, today’s big announcements pertained to the fall 2011 releases of iOS 5 and Apple’s new free wireless synchronization service iCloud, as well as the July 2011 release of Mac OS Lion. Click on the title of this article for the full transcript, and visit our Flickr photostream for live photos from the event.

Apple announces iOS 5 with over 200 new features

image

During its WWDC keynote address today, Apple unveiled iOS 5, the latest version of its operating system for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. The software offers over 1,500 new APIs for developers and over 200 new user features, including an all-new notification system, a new “iMessage” messaging system that will work across all iOS devices, enhancements for the Camera app, Mail, Safari, Game Center, integration with Twitter, a new service called News Stand that works like iBooks but is meant for magazines and newspapers, AirPlay mirroring, which will let users beam whatever is on their iPad to an Apple TV, wireless syncing with iTunes, and over-the-air software updates, that also allow iOS devices to be setup and used without connecting them to iTunes. Apple will release iOS 5 this fall for the iPad, iPad 2, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, and third- and fourth-generation iPod touch.

“iOS 5 has some great new features, such as Notification Center, iMessage and Newsstand and we can’t wait to see what our developers do with its 1,500 new APIs,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “Perhaps iOS 5’s paramount feature is that it’s built to seamlessly work with iCloud in the Post PC revolution that Apple is leading.”

Covered Apple banners point to unknown announcement?

image

As noted by our editors inside the venue, Apple has several covered banners placed around Moscone West, in anticipation of an announcement or announcements to be made during the company’s keynote address this afternoon. The appearance of the covered banners is notable as Apple has uncharacteristically pre-announced its main talking points for the event, which include Mac OS X Lion, iOS 5, and iCloud, all of which are featured prominently on banners elsewhere in the building. It is possible that these banners feature a yet-unannounced product or service, or they could instead feature specific information—such as a release date for Mac OS X Lion—that Apple wants to keep under wraps until after the event.

 

image

Updated: The uncovered banners include details about iOS 5 and iCloud that were not previously public before the announcement.

iLounge on-site at WWDC; live coverage to begin shortly

image

iLounge’s editors are on-site at Moscone West in San Francisco, site of Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference. The event will kick off with a keynote address from Apple CEO Steve Jobs and other Apple executives beginning at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time/1:00 p.m. Eastern Time today. During the address, Apple will be discussing Mac OS X Lion, iOS 5, and its new iCloud service. As with past live events, we’ll be switching over to our optimized Live.iLounge.com page right before the event begins, and will also host a separate chat room for reader discussions of the announcements as they happen. Stay tuned!

Apple hires jailbreak dev to work on iOS notifications?

Apple may have hired Peter Hajas, the developer behind the jailbreak replacement notification system Mobile Notifier, to work on iOS’ notification system. Redmond Pie reports that Hajas indicated in a recent Twitter update that he would soon be going to work for a “fruit” company in California. In a follow-up blog post, Hajas wrote that we couldn’t say why he was stepping away from app development, but that “it’s worth it,” adding that “if you look around hard enough, you’ll probably figure it out” before finishing the the line “stay hungry and stay foolish,” a reference to the phrase Apple CEO Steve Jobs used to close out his 2005 Stanford University Commencement speech. [via Business Insider]

iLounge’s live coverage of WWDC 2011: Monday at 10AM PT/1PM ET

iLounge will be providing live coverage of Apple’s 2011 Worldwide Developers Conference keynote address, which is slated for Monday, June 6, at 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time/1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. During the event, Apple is expected to preview iOS 5, the next-generation version of its operating system for the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, unveil its iCloud online service, which is expected to include a music storage and streaming component, and discuss Mac OS X Lion, the latest version of its desktop OS. As with past live events, we’ll be switching over to our optimized Live.iLounge.com page right before the event begins, and will also host a separate chat room for reader discussions of the announcements as they happen. See you then!

Apple to pay labels $100M+ for iCloud deals?

Apple has agreed to pay the four major music labels between $100 and $150 million in advanced payments as part of its cloud music deals, according to a new report. Citing three separate sources, the New York Post reports that Apple will pay each label between $25 million and $50 million to get on board with the iCloud service, dependent on how many tracks early customers are storing. According to the report, these same payments were a major hold-up for Google in its discussions with the labels, and may have influenced its decision to launch its cloud service without label support. The report states that Google will now likely have to pay higher fees to secure deals similar to those between the labels and Apple, but could have a similar cloud offering online as soon as September.

Apple iCloud to cost $25/year, feature advertising?

Becoming the second outlet to report that Apple has signed a cloud music deal with Universal, giving it deals with all four of the major labels, the Los Angeles Times has provided additional details on Apple’s upcoming iCloud service. Citing sources familiar with the negotiations, the report claims that the service will initially be offered for free to customers who purchase music from the iTunes Store, but will eventually cost roughly $25 a year. The report also states that Apple plans to sell advertising around the iCloud service—specifics, including if the ads would appear for paid subscribers, were not offered—and that the company’s agreements with the labels call for it to share 30 percent of any revenue from the service with the labels, as well as 12 percent with music publishers. In line with recent reports, it also notes that although the service is initially focused on music, Apple eventually plans for the service to be used for movies, TV shows, and other digital content sold through iTunes.

Sign up for the iLounge Weekly Newsletter

Email:

iLounge is an independent resource for all things iPod, iPhone, iPad, and beyond.
iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, Apple TV, Mac, and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc.
iLounge is © 2001 - 2014 iLounge, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy