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How to play your iTunes music on other devices

“So you’ve got an iPod, you go and buy music but then your machines dies, or have many many computers and devices you listen to music on, or maybe sometimes you use an operating system not supported by iTunes, how can you listen to your purchased music? Well, usually you can’t- why? Because the songs you purchased are DRM protected, that means you can only listen to them on specific computers and devices. For most folks the limits of a few computers or devices are fine, but for the gadget geek- nope, we have too many computers and devices. It would be like buying a DVD but only being able to watch it in some rooms, or only some TVs.

Now to be clear, this isn’t a way to take music you bought and give it to someone else, this is so you can listen to your own purchased music on other systems or devices. In fact, your personal info is still in the file.”

Chinese PC maker to preinstall iTunes

“Apple Computer has announced that Founder, a major supplier of personal computers to the Chinese market, will preinstall the Windows version of Apple’s iTunes digital music software on all of its PCs beginning in June.

With iTunes installed, users of Founder PCs will be able to copy music from their own audio CDs, create playlists, share music on LANs using Rendezvous, and listen to music on the iPod, Apple’s popular digital music player.”

iTunes wins Webby Awards

iTunes has won two out of the three nominated categories in this year’s Webby Awards for best ‘Commerce’ and ‘Music’ website. It lost to Google in the ‘Services’ category. Apple was also awarded for best ‘Music’ website as the People’s choice winner.

Apple plans to add rare and out-of-print songs to iTMS

“ITunes, the leader of the digital music services pack, has a catalog of over 700,000 songs—but that’s not nearly enough for Apple. To maintain its lead, the company is on a hunt to find exclusive music, everything from out-of-print singles in music company vaults to songs that have never been pressed onto a CD and even recordings from the estates of deceased artists. [...]

And if anyone can get the labels to open the vaults, Jobs can, analysts said.

‘What Jobs is saying is, ‘We’d be happy to take all this content that is rotting away in warehouses and turn it into a new revenue source for you,’ said Barry Ritholtz, a market strategist with Maxim Group, a money-management firm. ‘It’s probably a bit much to say Jobs is saving the music industry, but he’s showing them the way into the digital age. They have been stumbling around drunk in the dark.’”

iTunes interface patent awarded to Apple

“Apple Computer has won a patent for the interface of its iTunes music software, underscoring the growing importance of the multimedia business for the company.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued Apple a patent for its media player software interface on May 4, along with several other features of the company’s high-profile products. Other parts of the iTunes software, including the ability to stream songs over a network to another copy of the program, had been the subject of earlier patents.”

PlayFair is back, again

“The PlayFair free software project is back online, with both the maintainer of the project and the hosting service willing to face a legal challenge from Apple.

Apple last month shut down the free software project, which enables advanced audio coding (AAC) files downloaded from Apple iTunes to be played on platforms that Apple does not support. It does that by stripping the Digital Rights Management (DRM) mechanism from a song, provided the key for playing the song is available.

The project has been renamed Hymn, according to Anand Babu, the maintainer of the project. It is being hosted on two sites (http://playfair.org/ and http://hymn-project.org) by a U.S. hosting service provider. Babu said last month that the project would be hosted outside the U.S.”

Apple denies iTMS price increase

MacMinute reports that Apple on Friday denied a report in the New York Post that it plans to raise the prices of some tracks on its iTunes Music Store to US$1.25 a song. “The rumors aren’t true,” Natalie Secqueira, an Apple’s spokeswoman, told CBS Marketwatch. “We have multi-year agreements with the record labels and our price remains 99 cents a track.”

Major record labels re-sign for iTunes, prices may increase to $1.25 a song

“The five major record labels have been in negotiations recently with Apple over pricing and other issues associated with the year-old download service, which was launched to great fanfare last April.

All five of the deals - with Universal, Sony, BMG, EMI and Warner Music - have already been signed, sources say, and the new pricing is already being rolled out for albums.

EMI and Sony Music, which this week launched its own download service called Sony Connect, were said to be the most aggressive on pricing.

Under the terms of some of the deals, the prices for some of the most popular singles could rise to $1.25, according to sources familiar with the negotiations. Songs have previously been priced at 99 cents across the board.”

European labels scared of Apple dominance

“Music labels are dragging their feet in licensing their songs to Apple Computer because they fear its long-promised European music download site will dominate the online business, industry insiders say.

The five main record labels are understood to be scared that Apple, which makes the iPod digital music player, will become as successful in Europe as it has in the US, where it has 70 per cent of the legal download business. That could let it dictate which stars or records succeed or fail by deciding which to promote on its site.”

iTMS sells 3.3 million songs in one week

“Apple today announced that music fans have purchased and downloaded a record setting 3.3 million songs from its third generation iTunes Music Store since its launch one week ago. Highlighting the popularity of its innovative new features, iTunes users have already published more than 20,000 iMixes, and those iMixes have been rated by fellow iTunes users over 50,000 times. In addition to the 3.3 million purchased songs, iTunes users have downloaded more than 500,000 free songs from popular artists including Foo Fighters, Avril Lavigne, Courtney Love, Annie Lennox, Jane’s Addiction, Counting Crows, Renee Fleming and Nelly Furtado during Apple’s week-long “Free Song of the Day” anniversary promotion.

‘Our third generation iTunes Music Store just blows away any other online music service,’ said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. ‘With over 700,000 songs and innovative features like iMix, it’s the easiest to use and most fun to use online music store in the world.’”

Mo’ Motown comes to iTunes

“Motown is emptying its archives into Apple’s iTunes Music Store to mark its 45th anniversary. The famed label is making available the first 45 singles it issued as well as 45 hard-to-find albums from such superstars as Marvin Gaye, the Supremes and Diana Ross, the Four Tops and Smokey Robinson, among many others.

According to Motown, the “vast majority” of these albums are being made available for digital download for the first time. The promotion will run through May 25 and coincides with the May 17 ABC broadcast of the “Motown 45” TV special.”

Win a $500 iTunes Gift Certificate

McGraw Hill Osborne is giving away three prizes of $500 iTunes Gift Certificates between now and January 15, 2005. “Three (3) separate winners will be chosen at random. The first winner will be chosen August 2nd, 2004, the second winner will be chosen October 29th, 2004 and the third and final winner will be chosen February 15th, 2005.” No purchase necessary. Only open to U.S. residents.

iTunes prices should be lower, labels “don’t get it”

“But some popular albums are inexplicably higher. Buying all 14 tracks on Jessica Simpson’s “In the Skin” on iTunes cost 13.86. The physical album, including a bonus DVD with scenes from her wedding, is $13.39 from Amazon. Sheryl Crow is perhaps the artist who has most aggressively promoting legal downloading.  Her 2003 greatest hits album has a song missing on iTunes; buying the 16 others will cost you $15.84. The physical CD with all 17 songs cost $9.99 on Amazon.

This is crazy. Online prices should always be much lower than physical CDs. The economics of downloading favor high volume. CDs have to be pressed, warehoused and shipped, but in the online world, you transmit a file to the vendor and just collect money. When a super popular artist like Norah Jones emerges, forget about convincing a hundred thousand people to download it at $13-get a million people to make the mouse-buy for five bucks. It’s nice to sell 100,000 Norah Jones albums online at $13, but even better to sell 2 million at five bucks a pop.”

XtremeMac May Music Giveaway

XtremeMac has announced they will be giving away a $100 iTunes Gift Certificate in their May Music Giveaway. Place an order with XtremeMac and you are automatically entered into the giveaway. Contest ends May 31.

Not Good: Jobs Changes The iTunes Rules

“I don’t know about you but when I invest in a certain type of media I don’t expect the rules to be randomly changed on me. While AppleÕs recent change to the Digital Rights Management (DRM) agreement may seem benign the changes, by the their very existence, are a dangerous precedent.”

You can still redeem your Pepsi/iTunes code

Although the redemption deadline for the Pepsi/iTunes song giveaway has officially expired as of Friday, April 30, the “Redeem Song” page is still available via iTunes. For those still hanging on to winning codes redeem them quickly, before it’s too late.

Forbes suggests new features For iTunes

“But what’s needed next is the additional layer of information that typically goes with music sold in brick-and-mortar stores: the packaging.

The new iTunes feature that lets those who buy an album print out the cover art addresses this, to a point. But what’s missing are the other bits of information about the album that typically come with CD packaging—liner notes, jacket copy, lyric sheets and so on. Jazz and classical fans in particular often enjoy reading the jacket copy.”

Free iTunes 4.5 troubleshooting guide released

Blogger, François Joseph de Kermade has published a free troubleshooting guide (PDF) for iTunes 4.5. “I have published a first-aid troubleshooting guide that should answer most of the questions you ask yourselves after the update.”

Transcript of iTunes conference call published

The Mac Observer has posted a complete transcript of yesterday’s iTunes anniversary conference call with Steve Jobs. Here he describes the new WMA to AAC conversion feature in iTunes 4.5:

“Another thing we’ve added is automatic WMA to AAC conversions, that is automatic conversion from WMA—which is the format that many people use on Windows—to AAC—which is the format that iTunes uses—so that Windows users can automatically create iTunes versions of the songs encoded in unprotected WMA, which means if you’re adding iTunes to your PC, you’ve got a music library in WMA, it will automatically create an iTunes version that is playable in iTunes, allow you to convert your library to iTunes and sink it to iPod just really in a snap. And this is going to help us a lot in the Windows market along with HP and some of the other things we’re doing and we’re excited about that.”

iTunes 4.5 cracked in less than 24 hours

SlashDot reports that in less than 24 hours someone in Australia has cracked the new authentication algorithm in iTunes 4.5. “iTunes 4.5 uses a new authentication algorithm. However, not even 24 hours after I downloaded it, and that includes a little sleep and lots of uni time,  I’ve broken it. Hah. Anyhow, libopendaap 0.2.0 and tunesbrowser 0.1.4 are now available.”

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