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Crutchfield’s how to connect an iPod in your car

  • February 3, 2004
  • iPod

Auto stereo equipment retailer Crutchfield has posted a four page how to on connecting your iPod in the car. Several topics are covered from mounting an iPod, connecting an iPod, and using an iPod while in the car. It also mentions in a ‘Wish list’ section that Alpine will soon be releasing head units for connecting and controlling an iPod, and goes on to mention other possible solutions coming soon. “I suspect that makers of vehicle-specific CD changer adapters and satellite tuner cradles are hard at work on iPod solutions. And Daimler-Chrysler already has an iPod dock in one of its European Smart cars. Can it be long before this technology appears in stateside Chryslers? Stay tuned.”

How hard is it to spell “iPod?”

  • February 2, 2004
  • iPod
“iPOD, IPod, i-Pod. I’d hate to think what would happen if these people had to do a story about e e cummings. Let’s kick off the parade of humiliation with a story by The Inquirer. No, not the one where you can get all the Ben Affleck news you need, but the online news source that looks to steal more than a bit of its design from The Register. While reporting that Virgin Mobile is planning to sell music via its mobile handsets, it repeatedly refers to the iPOD, perhaps feeling it has to balance that lower-case “i” at the beginning of a proper noun with LOTS OF CAPS. Wouldn’t want it to tip over.”“

LOTR filming used iPods for digital dailies

  • January 30, 2004
  • iPod

Although this story is a bit old, The Hollywood Reporter today posted a writeup about how Peter Jackson, writer/director of The Lord of the Rings (LOTR) trilogy and Jim Rygiel, visual effects supervisor, used iPods in the film’s production.

“Media was transferred from Weta to Pinewood Studios in London. There, Jackson’s 30-gig iPod was ready and waiting to upload Weta’s daily fresh-baked shots and sequences. His iPod was then delivered via sneaker net to his home a few minutes away from Pinewood.

Jackson then viewed those 1K-resolution QuickTime files on an Apple Cinema Display, tied to his G4 laptop, which drew directly from his iPod. The director’s setup was mirrored in New Zealand, so Rygiel and crew could step through shots with the help of their iPods, with Jackson’s guidance piped in over a videoconferencing system. During the course of two movies and four months, “Rings” iPods stored and served up nearly one-half terabyte of digitized footage from ‘Towers’ and ‘King.’”

Calling all software developers: Website content on iPod

  • January 30, 2004
  • iPod

“So I have to ask: why hasn’t anyone created a utility that can be aimed at various web pages or RSS feeds and grab their contents, convert them into plain-text format, and drop ‘em in the Notes folder of an iPod? Yes, it would require some clever page-scraping, and yes, it would require intelligent splitting and hyperlinking of stories using the bare-bones coding format that the iPod understands.

But still, it shouldn’t be that difficult. While there are some RSS browsers out there for the iPod, they don’t thrill me, because most RSS feeds don’t include the full text of news stories. And I don’t know of any RSS tool for the iPod that actually downloads the contents of the page referenced by the RSS entry. I want to read more than headlines on my iPod; I want to read the whole article!”

iPod chip maker PortalPlayer behind the spotlight

  • January 30, 2004
  • iPod

“In 2001 the small firm beat out nine competitors, including Texas Instruments, to provide iPod’s central nervous system. Apple’s in-house designers provide the look and feel that make the iPod so distinctive; PortalPlayer provides the innards that lie beneath. It won over Apple with a design that uses two modest processors and an operating system two years in the making.

PortalPlayer’s “firmware” makes it easy for makers to mix and match features and rapidly stamp out upgrades without having to start from scratch. Apple picked PortalPlayer in the summer of 2001, and the iPod was in stores in November of that year.”

Apple working on Video iPods?

  • January 29, 2004
  • iPod

“One of the best things about prognostication is the “I told you so” satisfaction of a successful forecast, so over the past five years, I’ve made sure to point out all of my dead-on predictions. This time, however, I’m admitting to an apparently incorrect hunch. I thought that Apple would forgo an iPod portable video player (PVP), but the company is reportedly working on one. [...]

Last month, the careers page of Apple’s Web site advertised an opening for a video iPod developer. The listing has disappeared, but in this New York Times interview, Jobs mentions that someone in the company’s labs could be working on such a device. He also talks about some of the same doubts and challenges that I’m discussing here, so for the record, my prediction might still come true.”

Macworld UK Polls iPod users on the iPod battery

  • January 28, 2004
  • iPod

“And this week’s Macworld.co.uk poll would suggest that the problem has, in the words of one of our readers, ‘been wildly overstated and time will show what a trivial issue this really is.’

Of the 1,047 readers polled 70 per cent have not experienced any reduction of battery life, and of these nearly half (49 per cent) admitted ‘I accept it will lose charge over time.’

Although 30 per cent of respondents have experienced decreased battery life just 14 per cent of these people state that they are ‘unhappy’ about the situation. The remaining 16 per cent have already accepted that their battery will not live on indefinitely.

However, 21 per cent of the iPod owners who have not yet experienced reduced battery life say that if it does happen they ‘won’t be happy’.”

iPod causing rifts in marriages

  • January 26, 2004
  • iPod

“The iPod is being blamed for causing rifts in relationships with a new breed of “iPod Widows” emerging. [...]

The report includes two case studies from the recently ‘widowed’. One describes how: ‘Every evening he gets the iPod out straight after supper and starts fannying around with it. Its taking over our lives.’”

iPod vs. high-end audio

  • January 23, 2004
  • iPod

Lee Gomes for the Wall Street Journal writes how, while attending CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas, he ventured into another smaller venue showcasing the worlds most expensive high-end audio systems. While there, he tests his iPod and the sound qualities of MP3 compression or lack thereof with several high-end systems. His first test was on a $350,000 Wavac SH-833 amplifier connected to $150,000 speakers, and standing nearby was the designer of the amp, Yuzuro Ito .

“I plugged in my iPod and queued up a song by Franz Schubert. Mr. Ito, an elegantly tailored man, closed his eyes and listened intently.

After a minute, he rendered his verdict through an interpreter. Alas, he said, ‘the top of the soprano is not so good. And on the piano, you aren’t getting the natural body of the instrument. Overall, the sound is too clear—all the hues have been stripped away.’

But, he added gamely, ‘it’s really good for digital.’”

UK House of Commons split over battery issue

  • January 23, 2004
  • iPod
“The House of Commons is split this morning over issues surrounding the battery life of Apple’s iPod, with two MPs offering their support to Apple following concerns raised over the limited lifespan of the iPod’s rechargeable batteries.”

Apple past, present, future, Analyst says iPod the leader for only 2 more years?

  • January 23, 2004
  • iPod

In light of Apple’s 20th Anniversary for Macintosh this Saturday, CNET has published a retrospective on Apple’s past, present and future.

““The rules of engagement for the iPod market are new. They don’t necessarily have to follow the same rules as with their old PC policies,” said Roger Kay, an analyst at research firm IDC. “They may relinquish some control in order to gain access or control of a market that could be orders of magnitude larger than their old one.” [...]

Apple has said the iPod will succeed by offering higher quality than its rivals, even if it costs more as a result. Many analysts say they expect Apple’s consistently innovative design and aggressive marketing to perpetuate the iPod’s appeal for at least the near term.

‘We think iPod’s leading position is defendable for perhaps two years and is important to Apple’s ‘cool’ image,’ Merrill Lynch analyst Steven Milunovich wrote in a recent research report analyzing the company’s finances.”

An idea for iPod - user removable battery

  • January 23, 2004
  • iPod
“Almost every portable electronic device from flashlights, to laptops, to cellphones have easy to access batteries. For many of these devices you simply flip a latch, screw off a cap, slide open a compartment and low and behold you can easily replace the battery of the device with a fresh one. Seeing as my 1G iPod warranty expired about 2 years ago, I just had to open it. Conveniently, I found that the battery is indeed the furtherest item from the front of the device (This is true in all generations of the iPod, as iLounge has exposed). Why Apple can not make the outer case of the battery more durable and allow you to slip the battery in and out from either the side or top/bottom of the iPod is beyond me.”

O’Reilly: Five things the next iPod software version needs to have

  • January 22, 2004
  • iPod

“Here’s five things Apple could put in the next update to the iPod’s software that would make it a music power tool (in order of how much I want them):

1. Line-in recording
iPod hackers have shown that the iPod is capable of recording a few seconds of audio through it’s headphone port. Being able to record through this port as actual line in would enable you to record pure audio whenever you could get a line. No, the current voice recorder doesn’t count.”

HP’s, Carly Fiorina talks iPod, music piracy and more

  • January 21, 2004
  • iPod
“Music is going to be a huge part of the digital entertainment experience. No one has done it better than Apple. Our contribution is going to be to bring Apple to a wider market, a wider audience and also to make the digital music capability that Apple makes possible work within this broader system. You know the other thing that frustrates consumers? They get all these little gizmos and gadgets, but they don’t work together. The HP iPod and iTunes is not just going to be another great gizmo, it’s not going to be just another great music player—it’s going to fit into this digital entertainment experience for the consumer.”

Shakespeare’s Sonnets on your iPod

  • January 21, 2004
  • iPod

Westering has released Shakespeare’s Sonnets as Notes as a free download. Instructions for downloading to iPod are available on the website.

Members of Parliamant in UK vote on iPod battery issue

  • January 21, 2004
  • iPod

“Concern over the lifespan of the iPod’s rechargeable battery has reached the House of Commons, with 11 MPs [Members of Parliament] putting their names to a motion calling for Apple to ensure that replacement batteries are plentiful in supply and priced at a reasonable level.

Labour MP for Chorley, Lindsay Hoyle, tabled the motion, stating his concern regarding the “difficulty people are having in replacing batteries for iPods”.

He notes: “iPods were a favourite Christmas present, with a value of between 250 to 400, but when people come to buy replacement batteries they find that they cost 100 and that they have little knowledge of where such batteries can be obtained from”.”

“The iPod is the modern-day equivalent of the Samurai sword”

  • January 20, 2004
  • iPod

“It is a bit emasculating to admit this, but portable electronics have replaced sidearms in our culture. I draw upon the Japanese katana for my analogy for several reasons. First, the katana was much more than a mere weapon or cutting tool. It was a portable symbol of status, power, and class. The warrior class, the Samurai, were actually quite numerous. At their height they were nearly 10% of the population of Japan. Before 1876, wearing the katana conveyed to the casual observer that the wearer of the long and short swords possessed a rank and status of an elite group.

The simple fact that people are willing to pay hundreds of dollars more for an iPod, when equal technology is available in a less impressive-looking package, points directly to this analogy. People will pay more for a status symbol, and in doing so, they have made the iPod one of the most important cultural icons today.”

HP already had an iPod of sorts

  • January 19, 2004
  • iPod

“Back in 1999, researchers at Compaq designed a 30 Gbyte portable music player that weighed 9.5 ounces, could fit in your pocket and had 10 hours of battery life. The Personal Jukebox - aka PJB - went on sale for more than $500, and Compaq received a handy patent for its work.

But the PJB is not all that interesting in and of itself. Plenty of companies were busy working on their own music players at the time. The demand for such devices was pretty clear, as consumers rushed to organize their music on PCs and wanted a way to carry the tunes around. [...]

The only explanation for HP’s iPod lust is that it was the easy way out - the road least invented. [...]

HP’s decision to pick up Apple product points to nothing less than a failure of the company to capitalize on its own invention. In addition, it shows HP’s unmatched readiness to ignore in-house IP at the very moment a fledgling market looks promising.”

Apple posts new iPod commercial

  • January 19, 2004
  • iPod

Apple has posted a new iPod TV commercial for viewing at Apple.com which features “Channel Surfing” by Feature Cast. It had been shown for the first time during Steve Job’s Keynote speech at Macworld San Francisco.

Macworld UK: One-in-six Xmas iPods sold in UK

  • January 14, 2004
  • iPod

“Apple UK achieved excellent results during the last (December) quarter, with one-in-six iPods sold over the Christmas period worldwide shifting in the UK market, Macworld UK has learned.

It appears that in the region of 125,000 iPods were sold in the UK the largest market for the product in Europe. This means the UK accounts for 17 per cent of global iPod sales.”

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