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Apple asked Sony for iTunes partnership?

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By Dennis Lloyd

Publisher, iLounge
Published: Friday, September 3, 2004
News Categories: iTunes

“Apple Computer Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs offered Nobuyuki Idei, chairman and group CEO of Sony, the chance for Sony to come aboard Apple’s ITunes Music Store service, the Nikkei Sangyo Shimbun newspaper reports in its September 2 edition.

The offer would have allowed for joint operation of the service, the newspaper says.”

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Comments

1

Well big suprise there NOT!

Sony are about as much reday to give the Keys to ATRACK Format away, as is Apple is to give them the Key’s to AAC.

Besides has anyone notices the Anti iPod FUD on the ‘Net lattey? ‘We’d like to support the Mac & iPod, but Evil Apple refuses to give us access to AAC!

Posted by Ichijoe on September 3, 2004 at 8:11 AM (PDT)

2

So Sony rejected Apple’s offer, like Apple rejected Real?

That’s funny. Apple is like Real Networks, to Sony.

Posted by Ha on September 3, 2004 at 1:25 PM (PDT)

3

Ha -

When did Real ever offer anything to Apple?

Posted by Schiano on September 3, 2004 at 1:59 PM (PDT)

4

Real perhaps offered them the ‘advantage’ of adding an annoying toolbar icon.

“New iTunes update”

*3 hrs later*

“iTunes may be out of date, check for updates now”

Posted by Chipseh on September 3, 2004 at 3:02 PM (PDT)

5

Maybe they both should just switch to the MP3… or what about OGG?

Posted by Me on September 3, 2004 at 3:25 PM (PDT)

6

Haha, reminds me of Microsoft being reject by Sony re: PS2 and then creating the Xbox after Gates angerally said “make it happen!” smile

Posted by Jeffrey on September 3, 2004 at 5:08 PM (PDT)

7

Seems that Sony miscalculated.

Posted by Big Sid on September 3, 2004 at 5:49 PM (PDT)

8

Ichijoe - AAC is just MPEG-4 audio.  If you look at the file extention, its .m4a.  The thing that Apple is holding tight and simply will not let go of is Fair Play, their digital rights format.  Clearly they wanted to get Sony as a partner so that they wouldn’t have to compete, but they didn’t so they do/will. 

Me - No one will ever get any contracts with the big record companies if they sell tracks online in an unprotected format.  They see that as just asking for people to go and put their freshly bought tracks onto p2p networks, which undercuts their whole affinity to selling harder to share files at a lower cost than CDs.  Also, OGG is largely useless due to its overwhelming lack of adoption.  MP3, AAC and WMA do the job for most people, so they have no reason to switch to a format that they’ve never heard of that has a funny name and probably doesn’t work on their portable player. 

Posted by Alden on September 3, 2004 at 8:39 PM (PDT)

9

I think Apple and the iPod have had a lot to do with the acceptance of AAC. If Apple had instead chosen ogg as the format to sell iTMS songs in, it would be much more popular.
And for the record, AAC is an unprotected format. What Apple did is encrypt the AAC files, which I assume, would have been just as easy to do with MP3. My guess is that 1) Apple wanted to push their own format and 2) MP3 has the stigma of being the “pirate format,” so there probably would have been less acceptance of it from the labels.

Posted by chrono325 on September 3, 2004 at 10:15 PM (PDT)

10

wtf

honsetly, why would this be of any interest to anyone… 8 months ago, someone MIGHT have asked someone else for a partnership at a gold tournament(even though both will not acknowledge it as true). a partnership that we know will never happen… so why is this even a story?

Posted by bleh on September 3, 2004 at 10:59 PM (PDT)

11

“I think Apple and the iPod have had a lot to do with the acceptance of AAC. If Apple had instead chosen ogg as the format to sell iTMS songs in, it would be much more popular.
And for the record, AAC is an unprotected format. What Apple did is encrypt the AAC files, which I assume, would have been just as easy to do with MP3. My guess is that 1) Apple wanted to push their own format and 2) MP3 has the stigma of being the “pirate format,” so there probably would have been
less acceptance of it from the labels.”

it is very clear that you have never actully used acc and compared it to mp3, because if you have you will realise that acc sounds alot better, the issue it not about mp3 being a code used on p2p and the ipod supports mp3 anyway. and ogg will not be used because apple are planing to sell music in a portected format that is better keeped private not open ot anyone

Posted by bob on September 4, 2004 at 7:02 AM (PDT)

12

“1) Apple wanted to push their own format”

AAC
IS
NOT
APPLE’S
FORMAT

Posted by br- on September 4, 2004 at 8:29 AM (PDT)

13

BR-

GET YOUR HEAD OUT OF YOUR ASSS!

Posted by Talking Madness on September 4, 2004 at 9:41 AM (PDT)

14

Lol Br- is right in some ways but completely wrong in others. aac is apples format that is an addaption of the mpeg-4 standard.

Posted by Will Burn on September 4, 2004 at 12:25 PM (PDT)

15

“AAC is an unprotected format.”

AAC is a subset of MPEG-4 that is protected by patents and restrictive licensing. You want to implement an AAC encoder, you have to pay dues to the AAC license group that then distributes the booty to its member companies. You want to stream AACs, you also have to pay license fees.

Use a free format such as Ogg Vorbis instead. Oggs are completely free to make, engineer, improve, and deliver or stream. And they sound *better* than AACs.

http://www.vorbis.com/

Posted by live free or die on September 4, 2004 at 4:31 PM (PDT)

16

Apple does not own AAC—stop saying it’s their format.  They don’t own it, they only use it.

Posted by Schiano on September 4, 2004 at 6:39 PM (PDT)

17

“Apple does not own AAC”

No, but Apple does own FairPlay - and refuses to license the FairPlay API or restricts legal access to FairPlay-protected AACs from most other companies and inidividuals.

Posted by possession on September 4, 2004 at 7:23 PM (PDT)

18

Possession-

Thank you for making the point!

It doesn’t really matter if Apple owns AAC or not…they’re controlling its use through iTunes and the iPod.

Many consumers, myself included, don’t want to have to buy music from one place to use on our iPods…nor do we want music we buy from ITMS to only work on our iPod and no other player.

Think about the future guys…truly open codecs and formats (or in the case of downloaded music, universal encryption) are the only way to go.

Don’t be an Apple fan boy.  Don’t propose that it should be any other way.  Would you want to have to buy your DVDs from a certain store?  Would you want to have to buy your gasoline from a certain station?  Would you want to have to buy your groceries from a certain grocery store?

The list is endless…and the answer to all the questions is NO!

Apple will not go under if they share their encryption…hell they may even do better.

Posted by Talking Madness on September 4, 2004 at 10:31 PM (PDT)

19

You’re all overlooking the obvious. This isn’t about competing formats or fairplay or AAC or anything like that. It is about Apple getting access to Sony’s giant song and artist catalog. It is the biggest piece of the content pie that they don’t offer on iTunes. As long as Sony content is not available to iTunes users, Apple is vulnerable to competition. An agreement with Sony would create the largest body of music available anywhere. And that would be the nail in everyone else’s coffin.

My .02.

Posted by mikey on September 4, 2004 at 10:38 PM (PDT)

20

you act as if apple is the only one…

can real songs be played on winamp(or other players)?

i dont think so.. so who are they to say that apple is being a jerk by not opening their format

at lesat apple gives you a quality service(unlike others)

but who knows if apple wont give fairplay up.. maybe they just wouldnt give it to real(which i dont blame them for)

Posted by no name #2 on September 4, 2004 at 10:42 PM (PDT)

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