Apple CEO Jobs: iPhone OS offers ‘freedom from porn’ | iLounge News

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Apple CEO Jobs: iPhone OS offers ‘freedom from porn’

In an atypically lengthy email exchange with Valleywag editor Ryan Tate, Apple CEO Steve Jobs made several comments explaining and defending his company’s stance relating to third-party iPhone OS development. Tate, incensed by Apple’s latest iPad commercial, wrote Jobs asking whether a 20-year-old Bob Dylan—often cited as an inspiration for Jobs—would think the iPad had anything to do with a “revolution,” stating that “[r]evolutions are about freedom.” Jobs responded positively, saying it represents freedom from “programs that steal your private data” and “trash your battery” and “[f]reedom from porn.” Quoting Dylan, Jobs added, “The times they are a changin’, and some traditional PC folks feel like their world is slipping away. It is.”

When Tate commented that he’d “rather have a Wired magazine app that offers interactivity [referencing the mag’s demo app built on Adobe Air] than one that is a glorified PDF,” Jobs responded that “Wired is doing a native Cocoa app,” as is “almost every publisher.” Tate then argued that they were only making native Cocoa apps because they have to, to which Jobs replied that “they don’t have to. They don’t need to publish on the iPad if they don’t want to. No one is forcing them. But it appears they DO want to.” He continued, “The magazine apps will be far better in the end because they are written native. We’ve seen this movie before.” After another round of replies from Tate, Jobs summed up in his final email, “we’re just doing what we can to try and make (and preserve) the user experience we envision. You can disagree with us, but our motives are pure.”

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Comments

1

I side with Steve Jobs. The iPad is Apple’s product, the iPhone OS is their product, and they are clearly trying to overcome some problems and dangers common to many users. As a techie (a software engineer), I’d love to have a “wide open” iPad, where I could load any piece of software developed with any tools, but that does open the user to risks.

I have my own limited criticisms of the OS, in its current form, but Apple may overcome some—or all—of those issues in future releases. The OS in the iPhone is much more useful to me than it was in its first release. I believe Apple wants to make the product as useful as possible to a wide variety of users. They are still learning our needs and our priorities. The iPad, due largely to its screen area, is a very different product than the iPhone—despite the common operating system.

The connected world clearly needs some policing. There are people out there who want to inflict damage, for various reasons, and “closing” the system in some ways seems to be a good way to deal with that, given current technology.

I’m hoping for more utility and versatility with the iPad, and I’m betting on Apple to make it possible. We’ll see…  OS 4.0 is the first step in that direction, and it’s still a half year away for the iPad.

Posted by Manatee on May 17, 2010 at 3:01 PM (CDT)

2

Steve Jobs handled himself exceedingly well during this and I commend him for actually talking to a jornalist (albeit a seriously irate one) personally, there’s not many other CEO’s that would do that.

However, though I am a huge Apple fan I am beggining to see problems with Apples approach to content i have zero problem with Apple keeping the system relatively locked. I do however have issues with Apple effectively telling us what we are and are not allowed to view and do on their devices. Sooner or later I feel this is going to become a serious issue for Apple to deal with especially with magazines becoming avaliable on the iPad and such.

Posted by Johnathan on May 17, 2010 at 3:28 PM (CDT)

3

“In the days of evil and anarchy you had ‘freedom to’, now you are granted ‘freedom from’. Don’t underrate it.”—Aunt Lydia, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

‘Freedom to’ tends to be libertarian. ‘Freedom from’ is more totalitarian.

Posted by clayj on May 17, 2010 at 4:24 PM (CDT)

4

I don’t want Steve Jobs deciding that boobies are bad for me, especially since Safari comes with every iPhone OS installation and is a firehose full of pornography, compared to the laughable material that was formerly available in the iTunes store.

Just slap a robust age restriction system on the iTunes store and be done with it, Steve, unless you’re planning on filtering what Internet content we can receive, for our own good.

Posted by Beau on May 17, 2010 at 4:41 PM (CDT)

5

@ Beau:

The difference is that with explicit apps, Apple would have to be the seller. With Safari, they have just supplied you with a web browser. You select where to go from there. There is more liability in being a seller. Ask any liquor store owner, cigarette seller or late-night “adult” store manager. If Apple is just flat out unwilling to take that liability on, that is their choice and no one can say it is really wrong. It IS their store.

With that said, I am sure there is a way for Apple to create an adult-only section to the App Store. Label it heavily and put some added restrictions on it. That should suffice for most customers. Everybody except the bible-thumpers are happy. They will not be happy as long as ANY explicit material is out there.

Posted by Mitch on May 17, 2010 at 5:44 PM (CDT)

6

Doesn’t anybody else notice that the “journalist” claims “[r]evolutions are about freedom”?
Call me picky, but that is far from an always true kind of comment.
I grant that his heart is likely in the right place, but isn’t it a bit presumptuous for some nobody journalist to tell Jobs how to do his business, even if it seems to many of us he has a point.

Posted by gully on May 17, 2010 at 6:23 PM (CDT)

7

I understand Apple’s wanting to keep things safe and secure. There are a lot of people out there who really don’t care about having more options or control over their devices. They want someone else to decide what kind of features they need and worry about security for them.

On the other hand, I can see this turning into another ‘iPod versus Creative/Rio/iRiver’ battle all over again. As much as I love my iPod, there’s no disputing that 4-5 years ago, it was not the most feature-filled MP3 player out there (I mean, it’s 2010 and it still doesn’t have graphic EQ). It was the best device for the most people. This was great for both Apple and its customers, but the iPod’s success forced the competition to either copy-cat or close shop, and those of us who wanted more to lower our expectations.

I wish Apple the best of success in the tablet/smartphone market. I just hope that this time the competition is able to compete. If not, at least Apple could develop a line-up of similar devices for ‘power-users’.

Posted by Paul on May 17, 2010 at 11:05 PM (CDT)

8

Apple has every right to police what they sell in their store.  Ever rented an “adult video” from a Blockbuster store?  Didn’t think so.  You don’t see anyone crucifying Blockbuster for restricting our rights and freedoms.

I actually think this is as much about Apple trying to limit how many apps they need to funnel through their approval process…imagine the deluge if they allowed porn?  They’d have to have a team of people watching porn all day long to approve or disapprove all the submitted apps.  As it is, they probably already reject a lot of apps for explicit content.

Posted by BrennerM on May 17, 2010 at 11:45 PM (CDT)

9

Most revolutions kill thousands and end up with people in charge who were worse than the ones they overthrew, so it’s probably best not to associate yourself too closely with that notion. 

Having said that, I prefer the apple way, where my stuff works.  I’m also sick of these so-called journalists who make their dough by slagging on SJ. Go criticize someone who deserves it.

Posted by Dick Bacon on May 18, 2010 at 1:02 AM (CDT)

10

“Just slap a robust age restriction system on the iTunes store and be done with it ...”
But how will Master Tate then be able to access the materiel he so desires?

Cheers

Posted by J.M. Heinrichs on May 18, 2010 at 4:01 AM (CDT)

11

I like the way Steve Jobs ended the e-mail conversations with this statement….Quote…

“By the way what have you done that’s so great? Do you create anything, or just criticize others work and belittle their motivations?”

Posted by theMISCH on May 18, 2010 at 9:12 AM (CDT)

12

********
I like the way Steve Jobs ended the e-mail conversations with this statement….Quote…

“By the way what have you done that’s so great? Do you create anything, or just criticize others work and belittle their motivations?”
********

Sounds a little immature to me. In other words, don’t you dare criticize the Dear Leader unless you are important enough.

Posted by Dale on May 18, 2010 at 11:22 AM (CDT)

13

Dale:
I am not exactly sure that is what he means. I think it’s more along the lines of Jobs questioning the emailers qualifications and motivations. It is really easy to criticize when you have no stake or responsibility in something.

Once someone creates something (especially something that changes things the way the App store, iPad, iPhone and iPod have), one has a personal responsibility to treat it with respect and keep its integrity. Of course this is subjective but only to outsiders. Not to the one who put their life into it.

The emailer is more concerned about what he WANTS out of the App Store and iTunes/iPad. His concerns are about himself and his needs (and the needs of those of his ilk). Jobs is concerned about what the App Store and iPad needs to stay viable for the longevity of the product as a whole, the integrity of the product, as well as staying responsible to his shareholders and to himself financially.

Posted by davjaxn on May 18, 2010 at 11:48 AM (CDT)

14

I agree with davjaxn. I doubt you would hear Jobs, or any other CEO of a major entity, say something like that to a journalist speaking with some conviction. In this case it was a blogger that had seen one of his fellow bloggers raked over the coals for an illegal act. Add a few cocktails and this guy was simply throwing stones. In his defense, it probably got him just what he wanted. A few solid quotes and some additional traffic.

I like Jobs. He can be nasty, but he is brutal when defending his vision and the company that is making it reality. He is hard on his employees, but tech is a demanding arena that calls for some tight reigns. Of course, his actions and ideas bring enemies. He apparently isn’t too big to get down in the dirt with them when it is called for.

Posted by Mitch on May 18, 2010 at 3:44 PM (CDT)

15

Flash Games would compete directly with App store games.  Corporations, including Apple, are driven by Money, not some altruistic bullshit motive like improving user experience.  It’s certainly a good side-efect, but not the root motive.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that :)

Posted by __redruM on May 18, 2010 at 10:07 PM (CDT)

16

Let me start off by saying that I enjoy using my iPhone; however, I’m not blind to its limitations.

My problem with Mr. Job’s position is that he talks about freedom and openess: but it turns out he wants to define what freedom we, as users, can have.  He’s not giving me the freedom that I want.  As a user and a customer, let me decide if I want what internet content I want to access (to include Flash); let me decide how I want to expend my device’s battery. 

The 1984 Apple Macintosh Commercial symbolized the Mac saving humanity from conformity posed by repressive social control systems (Big Brother).  Now, 16 years later, Mr. Jobs is becoming Big Brother and wants to have that control and force others into conform to his vision.

Apple is not open and never has been.  Apple’s control of the platform and iTunes is almost complete and often pretty aqrbitrary.  As a result, although I’ve never jailbroken my iPhone; I’m considering it.

Posted by Danny Adkins on May 19, 2010 at 9:50 AM (CDT)

17

Enough with the “so-called journalist” stuff. You don’t have to like Tate, but by every objective standard, he’s as much of a journalist as anyone else.

That doesn’t mean he exactly covered himself in glory in this exchange with Jobs (and neither did Jobs), but that doesn’t make him not a journalist.

Posted by Beau on May 19, 2010 at 12:35 PM (CDT)

18

Freedom from porn, yes, but what about the elevendryhundred fart noise apps?  Do we need Bluetooth-controlled fart-noise apps??? Apparently we do, as the app store offers several!! lol

Posted by Anonymous Coward on May 22, 2010 at 1:14 AM (CDT)

19

If the iPad has a browser, and Steve Jobs hasn’t installed nannyware on the browser, there’s no issue. Navigate to your favorite porn site and have fun.

If there’s nannyware on the iPad, it’s time to get another tablet computer from someone else (if they don’t yet exist, believe me they will before long), or buy a computer which doesn’t have nannyware, like iMacs or Windows computers.

Posted by FLoyd on May 22, 2010 at 11:20 PM (CDT)

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