Apple: French law will result in ‘state-sponsored piracy’ | iLounge News

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Apple: French law will result in ‘state-sponsored piracy’

Apple said on Tuesday that France’s proposed music interoperability bill would result in “state-sponsored piracy.” An Apple representative said the law—which would force the company to open its FairPlay DRM—is likely to cause digital music sales to steeply decline, but that iPod sales might actually increase. “The French implementation of the EU Copyright Directive will result in state-sponsored piracy,” said Apple spokeswoman Natalie Kerris. “If this happens, legal music sales will plummet just when legitimate alternatives to piracy are winning over customers… iPod sales will likely increase as users freely upload their iPods with ‘interoperable’ music which cannot be adequately protected,” Kerris said. “Free movies for iPods should not be far behind.”

 

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Comments

1

Told you.  Apple doesn’t care about consumers, only the big media companies.  It’s all about protecting the DRM.

Posted by stark23x on March 21, 2006 at 10:12 PM (CST)

2

Am I the only one who thinks this makes no sense? Not to mention, when Apple did the iTunes music store didn’t they say it was just a way to sell iPods and not a huge way to make money on its own (this also doesn’t point out that anyone with any other mp3 player may very well start to buy iTunes songs, INCREASING their sales).

Posted by catboy17 on March 21, 2006 at 10:43 PM (CST)

3

“Apple doesn’t care about consumers, only the big media companies.”  Guess what?  Those big media companies own the media.  So if they don’t want to release their stuff DRM-free and easily accessible to pirates, they won’t.  If that happens, the consumers lose, the artists lose, and the media companies lose too.  Reasonable DRM serves everyone involved.

Posted by James on March 21, 2006 at 11:24 PM (CST)

4

pretty weak statement from apple. Considering that you can already find everything offered on iTunes on other illegal download sites I don’t see how this will result in “state-sponsored piracy” in any way.

All this media is already easily accessible to the pirates James… DRM has never served to stop piracy in any way. All it has done is stopped the honest people from doing what they want with the songs they own. The pirates have continued unabated. The only ppl that win from DRM are the big media companies and the ones that lose are the consumers.

And yes, a reasonable DRM would serve a lot of people. Sadly Apple’s implementation of DRM only serves to further the iPod monopoly which in the end is bad for the consumer because it destroys competition.

Posted by Victor on March 22, 2006 at 12:14 AM (CST)

5

I thought it didn’t make sense at first, then I remembered reading this from the AP article “French Lawmakers OK Online Copyright Bill”:

“The new interoperability rules were welcomed in principle by record companies, which have often complained that iTunes has deprived them of any control over music pricing.

“‘The recording industry fully supports interoperability because it is important to consumers to have the ability to move songs between their various listening devices,’ said John Kennedy, chairman and CEO of the International Federation of the Recording Industry.”

Basically what Apple is trying to say is that the prices are going to go up and people will be forced into piracy.

And then I remembered reading somewhere else:

“Consumers are prepared to pay twice as much for a song that can freely move between different devices, a recent study of the European Union project Indicare showed.”

So legal music sales will “plummet”? It really is just speculation until it actually happens.

Apple says “interoperable” music cannot be adequately protected. Why? Because of differing DRM “standards”? I’m sure the geniuses at Apple can make it work. Why can’t there be an agreed upon standard, anyway, like how all CD players can play discs encoded in the “red book” (CD Digital Audio) standard.

Posted by Georg on March 22, 2006 at 1:32 AM (CST)

6

‘state-sponsored piracy’, That’s really not the fact because P2P is becoming illegal here and our ‘copie privée’ is not allowed anymore :(

And iPod sales won’t increase because if they close France ITMS, they will have to stop selling iPods too (if not, they will have to open DRM for already sold tunes).

Posted by steph on March 22, 2006 at 2:53 AM (CST)

7

I don’t see why Apple would have to either “open DRM for already sold tunes” or “quit selling iPods” in France. It is very rare that a new law has any retroactive validity at all. And if ITMS in France is closed I am not sure it will effect iPod sales that much either. You must remember that most ITMS stores in Europe did not open until last year, and sales of iPods had been healthy in Europe well before that happened.

/Galex

Posted by Galex on March 22, 2006 at 3:36 AM (CST)

8

“Free movies for iPods should not be far behind.

Posted by choo on March 22, 2006 at 6:30 AM (CST)

9

Free movies have already arrived folks

Posted by blick2000 on March 22, 2006 at 7:02 AM (CST)

10

The “state sponsored piracy” Apple is refering to is the unneeded government regulations the French are proposing.  The regs/laws would make it too difficult for any digital music service to profit.  The legit companies decide to withdraw from the French market leaving only the Kazaa’s of the world remaining. 

Also, Apple has an obligation not only to itself but also to it’s partners.  Apple doesn’t own the content it sells, it’s just a middleman for media companies.  Certainly Apple has some political capital it uses to strong arm the media companies into certain pricing models, content, etc; but it’s not going to blow it on protecting French consumers.  (Nothing against anyone reading this is France :))

Posted by billy bob on March 22, 2006 at 8:07 AM (CST)

11

Anything that’s good for the record companies cannot possibly be good for us.  Remember that;)

There are already ways around DRM.  Buy a CD and rip it in iTunes.  It won’t cost you ‘TWICE as much’ as the iTMS either.  Don’t have an ipod?  No problem, buy a cd and rip it in another program.

Good to see that US lawmakers aren’t the only ones wasting their time;)

Posted by David on March 22, 2006 at 8:21 AM (CST)

12

“Anything that’s good for the record companies cannot possibly be good for us.  Remember that”

Agreed - good point :)

Posted by billy bob on March 22, 2006 at 8:33 AM (CST)

13

As consumers, we need to wake up to the fact that our rights are being eroded little by little.  DRM gives one much less rights than we had with physical media - I can’t lend a DRM CD or book to a friend, sell it to a used book/music store when I’m done, or even, sometimes legally share it with other people in my household, listen to it on my work computer and home computer, etc.

And every new DRM scheme takes more freedoms away, while making it more cumbersome to actually access the content, even for what the record companies consider legal use.

I, for one, would welcome a class action suit to challenge Apple’s monopolistic iTunes policy and locking me into their hardware platform.  I can’t see how they can win that, even in the US.  Making the music available on other platforms is only a matter of providing an open DRM scheme.

Don’t tell me I can burn a CD and re-rip that - that means a second cycle of uncompress/compress, which reduces quality.  That’s not what I paid for when I bought my iTunes.

All this has changed my buying behaviour - I very seldom buy music off iTunes because of the DRM.  I’d much rather buy the CD, most of the time for about the same price as the album is in iTunes, and rip it in whatever compression I prefer.

I applaud the French for bringing this issue to front stage and forcing Apple to publicly commenting on it - weak statements like this does nothing to help Apple’s and the RIAA’s case.

Posted by kokketiel on March 22, 2006 at 9:25 AM (CST)

14

I agree with David that this is a waste of time and, ultimately, a power play. 

Who exactly is harmed by the current DRM scheme?  What do you want to do with your music that you can’t under FairPlay?  You want to load it on to something other than an iPod?  Fine, buy the CD or use another service.  Problem solved. 

You want to load it on to more than five of your own (not those of your friends) computers?  That, I agree would be a more technical challenge, but the number of people so affected must be minimal and seems like a reasonable protective compromise to also consider the record companies’ and artists’ interests—which we cannot simply brush aside as absolutely baseless since it is a business that I think we all want to continue to exist in some reasonable capacity.  In that case, by the way, you can also use the CD-burning workaround. 

You want to post it to a P2P service?  Sorry, but no “reasonable” DRM scheme will ever allow that, since that’s not a reasonable usage by any legitimate standards. 

So again, I ask, who is being harmed by the iTunes/iPod ecosystem?  And weigh that against the masses of people who obviously could care less about this debate and just enjoy the ease of use that this controlled ecosystem has brought about.  I dare say that were it not for the iPod phenomenon, digital music technically would be out of reach for many people who don’t waste their time like all of us trolling around iPod fan/foe sites debating the merits of DRM!

Posted by Devil's Advocate on March 22, 2006 at 9:33 AM (CST)

15

And to kokketiel, who says “I, for one, would welcome a class action suit to challenge Apple’s monopolistic iTunes policy and locking me into their hardware platform.  I can’t see how they can win that, even in the US.  Making the music available on other platforms is only a matter of providing an open DRM scheme…”

Kokketiel, how are you “locked into their hardware platform?”  There is virtually zero exclusive content that you can’t find via some other medium—be it a competing service or, as you point out, by buying the CD itself. 

And I’m not sure why you are not able to share legally between your family at home and on your work computer?  Are you surpassing the five authorized user limit?

Let’s face it.  Without DRM, iTunes would not have come about as the record companies would never had made their content available.  Is that what you would have preferred?

Posted by Devil's Advocate on March 22, 2006 at 9:37 AM (CST)

16

Ditto the Devil’s Advocate.

Posted by The Raven on March 22, 2006 at 10:57 AM (CST)

17

“What do you want to do with your music that you can’t under FairPlay?”
I want to listen to it on others devices for example on my Squeezebox or my Nokia phone which can read AAC files but not Fairplay…

That’s about monopoly. Apple with AAC Fairplay is like Microsoft with Windows. They lock the business with the DRM. You can’t play iTunes Music Store songs on a device which is not Apple Branded…

Apple just should licence Fairplay, they could earn a lot of money and be legal. That’s the way to go, folks. DRM are the evil, like Windows is. Monopoly is not good for anyone even Apple’s fans.

Posted by Steph on March 22, 2006 at 11:13 AM (CST)

18

Big deal, so Apple is in bed with the music mafia. DRM is wrong, period. Pragmatism does not justify it.

>>Let’s face it.  Without DRM, iTunes would not have come about as the record companies would never had made their content available.  Is that what you would have preferred? <<<

Posted by Mark on March 22, 2006 at 11:28 AM (CST)

19

It’s about the future, if you let Apple create a monopoly, it will be the same for video next time.
In a few years, you will have to stick with Apple products for you entire life, because all the music and films you’ve bought are only readable on Apple produts/devices…

Posted by Steph on March 22, 2006 at 11:32 AM (CST)

20

Devil’s Advocate: You’re locked into Apple’s hardware platform the moment you buy your first $0.99 song from iTunes.  This has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that there are other sources available for the song, and everything to do with the fact that you paid for something that is worthless once you go to another MP3 player.

You need to get your head out and start looking at the trends to see where the future is going.  As I’ve mentioned, every step ahead in DRM is bad for the consumer and against free marketing principles.  DRM locks up the source so new bands that want to distribute over iTunes need to pay, etc, etc.

Concerning using my music at work - I don’t want to install iTunes at work, therefor I can’t play any iTunes bought content at work on my computer.  That is not fair use, no matter what you say.  And I’m sure there are lots of people whose company policies prevent them from installing non-approved apps on their company supplied hardware.

And just for the record, I absolutely do not condone file sharing or stealing music any other way (e.g. lending your CD to your friend to let them rip it).  But DRM is not the way to go, especially not the way that Apple is doing it.  Apple is clearly not doing DRM only for piracy’s sake, but rather to specifically lock you into continuing to buy Apple iPods.  Otherwise they would have licensed their DRM a long time ago.

Posted by kokketiel on March 22, 2006 at 12:21 PM (CST)

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