Apple lowers content bar again, ‘Peep Show’ hits App Store | iLounge News

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Apple lowers content bar again, ‘Peep Show’ hits App Store

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By Charles Starrett

Contributing Editor
Published: Thursday, February 26, 2009
News Categories: Apps + Games

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Continuing to erode the line between “potentially offensive” and acceptable content, Apple has approved Peep Show, a virtual peep show app for the iPhone and iPod touch. As explained by developer Blazing Lizard, Peep Show puts you in front of a partially obscured window, with “shake controls” that are “easy and intuitive when looking at attractive women.” Users shake the device at a certain time to drop a coin into the slot, further revealing a photo of a woman. Missing the slot causes the blinds to cover up more of the image as a penalty. A total of six pictures of women are displayed over and over again by the app, none the same as the ones shown in the app’s current App Store preview page, and each only vaguely risque. Following last week’s revelation that Apple rejected a South Park application for “potentially offensive content,” however, this application only furthers the notion that Apple’s approval process is inconsistent at best. Rated as appropriate for users 9 years of age or older, Peep Show sells for $1.

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Comments

1

Where can we write to complain about this kinda stuff. Even if the picture is probably not that offensive, the app itself, the logo and everything around it is exactly what I do no want to see on iTunes.

Posted by David Civera on February 26, 2009 at 10:07 AM (PDT)

2

to David: do you object to the app being sold full-stop, or just to it being sold alongside the other apps in its category? Would you object to a category for risqué apps within the iTMS.

Posted by mike in boston or toronto on February 26, 2009 at 10:25 AM (PDT)

3

David, just because you don’t want to see this stuff on iTunes doesn’t mean that you are the censorship police for the entire iTunes community. Some people will like this, some won’t. If you don’t like it, don’t get it. The point of the article is that iTunes has a very blurry line over want is acceptable and what is not. It’s ridiculous.

Posted by jim on February 26, 2009 at 10:27 AM (PDT)

4

If iTunes is going to offer applications like Peep Show to the public, why not apps like the South Park one that recently was denied?

Posted by Frank on February 26, 2009 at 10:44 AM (PDT)

5

I’m going to go out on a limb here and assume that the people reviewing apps for the App Store can see a distinct difference between screaming cursing and blasphemy and showing pictures of women in bathing suits or underwear…

This is really not rocket science… You can have people in underwear or whatever in a movie, but drop a few F words in among other strong language and that would change the rating of the film. Why would Apps be any different?

Guess I’m just confused.

Posted by Chester on February 26, 2009 at 11:28 AM (PDT)

6

@ David,
You’re probably in favor of the “Fairness Doctrine” too?
Stay out of my life, please.

Posted by slb on February 26, 2009 at 6:24 PM (PDT)

7

I think you guys are being a bit hard on David.  His view, which apparently is that the app store overall should adhere to a certain decency level, certainly isn’t an extreme position.  In fact, Apple already has drawn a line beyond which it doesn’t support certain content.  For example, Apple doesn’t allow even soft-core porn on iTunes, even though there obviously would be a market for it.

In other words, Apple already discriminates on the basis of a moral standard.  Moreover, I think that most of us would agree that the line should be drawn somewhere (as a private entity, Apple need not adopt the anything-goes approach of the internet).  David simply proposes that the line should be drawn in a different place than it currently is.  It’s a view upon which reasonable minds may differ.

In my view, David’s proposed action (complain to Apple) also is the correct approach.  Note that he didn’t claim that everyone who might want this app is immoral; he simply wants Apple to know where he stands.  That, to me, is reasonable.

Personally, I’d like to see Apple carry NC-17 movies (some of which are quality films), and I’m not offended by somewhat racier fare elsewhere in the store.  However, like many people, I don’t like seeing this content alongside more mainstream offerings.  As a serious person, it’s highly annoying to look at popular apps and see something about farting near the top of the list.  Put it elsewhere, Apple, and I think you’d have a win both for the people that would prefer that this content not exist and for those who are looking for it.

Posted by eeg on February 28, 2009 at 2:45 PM (PDT)

8

eeg,

Fine ‘cept Apple already has too many lifetimes of Rap and hip-hop obscenity to blow that thought.
I think they should have an adult section to the store.
Period.

Posted by slb on February 28, 2009 at 7:32 PM (PDT)

9

On my router I have a filter that blocks adult sites, lingerie, bikinis, etc. As a family man I am not interested in that content… Apple should provide a way of filtering sexually suggestive/explicit content from Iphones and Itunes’ App store.

Posted by Mick Webster on April 28, 2009 at 1:10 PM (PDT)

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