Apple’s Jobs: iPod is here to stay | iLounge News

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Apple’s Jobs: iPod is here to stay

Apple CEO Steve Jobs told the Los Angeles Times this week that the iPod’s popularity will endure because it’s more than just a pop culture icon. “I don’t think we’re seeing trendiness here,” Jobs said of the iPod. “I think we’re seeing a product that’s truly revolutionizing the way we listen to music. We didn’t sell 2 million of them last quarter because it’s trendy, we sold 2 million last quarter because it’s a phenomenal product that’s reinventing the way people enjoy music.”

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21

narco, hear hear.  I’m sick of all the /. -type weenies here who break everything down to things like cost per megabyte and discount things like ease of use.  Did we see these pre-iPod MP3 players selling tens of millions? No.  Did we see Puff Daddy making a jewel-encrusted custom MP3 player BEFORE iPod, as he did once iPod was released?  No.  All this points to iPod being something special, something the competitors have yet to match (and arguably, will not be able to match for the foreseeable future).

Posted by ct77 on November 28, 2004 at 11:58 AM (CST)

22

Did we see Puff Daddy

Do I care about Puff Daddy? Why do you care about Puff Daddy? What is a “Puff Daddy” anyway?

Posted by Demosthenes on November 28, 2004 at 2:05 PM (CST)

23

Demosthenes—the point is, the iPod is successful, and it is more than the sum of its parts.

Why is iPod successful?

I submit it is not because iPod is a pop-culture phenomenon.

iPod is successful because it is easy to use, is superbly integrated with iTunes and iTMS, and looks great.

The same cannot be said for any competing MP3 player.

Again, iPod is popular because it is successful, not the other way around.

Posted by ct77 on November 28, 2004 at 4:47 PM (CST)

24

iPod is popular because it is successful, not the other way around.

Let me introduce you to the word tautology.

Posted by Demosthenes on November 28, 2004 at 5:14 PM (CST)

25

Demosthenes, that was one line in my entire post.

Read the rest of my post, and let me introduce you to the word context.

You’re telling me there’s a global conspiracy that’s robbing the Archos Jukebox of it’s rightful place at the top of the MP3 player market?

Please.

Posted by ct77 on November 28, 2004 at 7:35 PM (CST)

26

You’re telling me there’s a global conspiracy that’s robbing the Archos Jukebox of it’s rightful place at the top of the MP3 player market?

Don’t be silly, I certainly never said that. I advise you not to listen to the voices in your head in future.

iPod is successful because it is easy to use, is superbly integrated with iTunes and iTMS, and looks great.

iPod was wildly successful on Windows before it was integrated with iTunes. Therefore that cannot be a sole driver.

Other players are or can be integrated with iTunes. Therefore the iPod-iTunes “exclusivity” is not a sole driver.

If you add up the total percentage of iPod disk space, and compare it to total downloaded iTMS songs, then you find that a vanishingly small percentage of ipod hard disk space is actually occupied by iTMS songs. Therefore iTMS integration is a very minor factor for most iPod buyers.

By linking these two things inextricably you are buying into Apple’s simplistic ideology and betraying your shallow analysis of the market dynamics.

Posted by Demosthenes on November 28, 2004 at 7:41 PM (CST)

27

i don’t think your seeing the point.
The iPod is successful because of the fact that its the ‘iPod’, not the ‘best mp3 player’. its an icon of the market, its the best of the best.
People have adopted the iPod as a culture, and i for one certainly cannot see them doing that with any archos device or iRiver device any time soon. THey’re just not as good as the iPod.
Spooky2k/Dan

Posted by Spooky2k in barry, wales on November 28, 2004 at 8:39 PM (CST)

28

The iPod is doomed in the long run.

it may have 92% of the market now, but that will slowly drop to around 70%, and there’s nothing Apple can do to save it ;)

As for whether the iPod is actually BETTER (wheel, anyone?) or merely the “in thing” (which can happen to mediocre products as often as not)... I think we can safely say it’s not either/or. It’s BOTH—and yet not priced on the high end (or the low) per GB. That’s pretty hard to compete with.

(Features? FM would be neat occasionally. I’d rather have my photos! The iPod’s feature set isn’t smaller than other brands—it’s a different set.)

Posted by Nagromme on November 28, 2004 at 8:58 PM (CST)

29

Well Demosthenes, I guess we’ll just have to wait a few years to see which of us is right. =)

I’ve rather enjoyed debating this with you.  Have a good night.

Posted by ct77 on November 28, 2004 at 9:09 PM (CST)

30

wait a few years to see which of us is right.

I’m not so sure either of us is right or wrong. What, exactly, is it that you think I am saying? I wasn’t aware that I was staking a position, short of deconstructing the appeal of the iPod into two factors: the appeal of the device itself (which is substantial) and the appeal of the music contained within the device (also, possibly more, substantial).

I also advanced some observations on the size of the iPod’s hard disk, biz, that being so small confers some advantages, but when you want some really cheap big capacity storage you can’t beat 2.5” drives. Well, you can with 3.5” drives. And I remember back in the day when you could get 5.25” drives… now they were monsters! And back in the mists of time there were these fabulous entities known as 8” drives!

Posted by Demosthenes on November 28, 2004 at 9:52 PM (CST)

31

The iPod is a hit…no doubt about it!

Apple got lucky…no doubt about it!

Everyone’s luck runs out at some point…no doubt about it!

Posted by Talking Madness in Los Angeles on November 29, 2004 at 4:39 AM (CST)

32

Demosthenes: true enough.  Heck, I work with a guy whose office has several large cylinders in it, about half a foot high and nearly two feet wide.  They are 20 megabyte hard disks, back from the days when DEC was king in “micro"computers. =)

Posted by ct77 on November 29, 2004 at 6:20 AM (CST)

33

ct77, I think yo umisunderstand. 

The iPod is definately trendy and it has caught on to a large degree, but they did not do anything revolutionary.  They took a technology already existing and made it trendy.  It is actually missing features of other mp3 players. 

To be revolutionary (according to my dictionary) is to bring about radical change, as far as the iPod goes… they didn’t create the change they simply created the most marketable version of pre-existing revolutionary technology.  They weren’t responsible for the “revolution” they only made the most successful version.

What I take issue with is Steve Jobs acting like he created the mp3 player… when all he did was make it “trendy”.  It’s one thing to say he made his mp3 player by far the most successful product on the market that’s considered a status symbol.  It’s quite another to say he created something revolutionary. 

Everything I can do on my iPod I could do on the very first HD based mp3 player I purchased before the iPod existed.  The iPod didn’t revolutionize anything, it didn’t bring any new ability or feature to the table, it just made the already existing product cool.

Don’t get me wrong it is terribly clever how it’s worked out, and the ITMS could be considered revolutionary, but the iPod itself is not.  Just a flashy version of the same thing we’d already had.  But I suppose that’s business… next “American Eagle” will be revolutionizing clothing.  “Nike” will have revolutionized shoes. 

Maybe we just disagree on the strength of a word like revolutionary.  I see it like this.  The first microwave oven was revolutionary… sure they have prettier models out with better features, but they’re only capitalizing on the initial idea.  It’s the same with the iPod.  It wasn’t the first “microwave”, it’s only a newer “microwave” in a nicer package.  It hasn’t changed anything, it’s just a bit cooler to own.

Posted by jab1981 on November 29, 2004 at 6:37 AM (CST)

34

The iPod didn’t revolutionize anything, it didn’t bring any new ability or feature to the table, it just made the already existing product cool.

The iPod’s wheel controller was pretty cool. Nobody had done very much with radial controllers since the Intellivisision handsets in the 1970s and some office telephone menu selectors in the 1980s and 1990s. But these were quite obscure.

Posted by Demosthenes on November 29, 2004 at 7:21 AM (CST)

35

Laugh all you want, but the Rio600 revolutionized the way I listened to music.  The iPod took it a step further for me, but it wasn’t a quantum leap at that point.

Napster revolutionized the way we listen to music.  Apple has just found an opportunity to capitalize on the movement.

Fanning is much more revolutionary in the music real than Jobs.  That’s not to say Fanning is on the same level as jobs…I’m not aware of anything he’s done other than Napster whereas Job/Apple do have a long history of somewhat pushing the envelope.

Posted by Talking Madness in Los Angeles on November 29, 2004 at 8:23 PM (CST)

36

You know the Rio 600 had quite a nice interface and design for a SonicBlue device. Detachable faceplates, reasonable navigation. Even a pseudo-wheel nav clicker (first launched by Diamond Rio in the PMP 300).
http://www.yopi.de/images/prod_pics/112/e/112273.jpg

Unfortunately for Rio owners, Sonicblue had also released the ReplayTV with auto commercial skip and internet show streaming so they ended up being sued to death by the TV companies around 2000/2001, just as the iPod was launching.

Unlike, say, Tivo, SonicBlue never just rolled over whenever the TV companies said so and preferred to fight them in court. In the final analysis this made for a great PVR, but a lousy business model. SonicBlue went through a bankruptcy then and its assets were sold off to Denon/Marantz, which really doesn’t understand either the PVR or the MP3 business. The inferior Tivo owns around 90% of the PVR market to ReplayTV’s 3%. The best way to think of Tivo/SonicBlue is to think of Microsoft/Apple. The more innovative company gets the smackdown while the commoditizer gets the market.

Oh yeah, here’s a pic of the Rio PMP 300—IMHO the first vaguely attractive mp3 player with a decent navigation system. And way back in the late 90s!
http://www.mp3daze.com/Images/rio300.gif

Posted by Demosthenes on November 29, 2004 at 8:41 PM (CST)

37

I had a Rio 500 back in the day.  It was $260, about the size of an iPod mini (slightly smaller and lighter, but not by much), and held a whopping total of 64 megabytes.  It actually had a bona fide SmartDisk reader in it—apparently that’s a “cheap” flash memory?  There was no such thing as playlists because you could only fit 12 songs on the thing.

I actually wish I still had it.  It ran for months on one AA battery and had a great customizable EQ.  I’d bet they’re going for like…$40 on eBay.  It would be worth it.

Posted by dethbrakr in Tacoma, WA on November 30, 2004 at 12:59 AM (CST)

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