Belkin intros new ‘for the Cure’ cases for iPod touch | iLounge News

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Belkin intros new ‘for the Cure’ cases for iPod touch

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By Charles Starrett

Contributing Editor
Published: Tuesday, September 29, 2009
News Categories: iPod Accessories

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Belkin has introduced two new “for the Cure” cases for the second- and third-generation iPod touch, with $2.50 of each case sold going to help Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The DualFit for the Cure armband features a dual-fit system designed to maximize sizing, a clear screen protector, a key pocket, a pink ribbon design on the armband, and reflective material for nighttime use. The Grip for the Cure is a form-fitting case offering a textured exterior for improved grip, a rear pink ribbon graphic, and open access to all ports and controls. Both cases are slated for a mid-October release and will sell for $30 each.

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Comments

1

Yet another, “look at me, I care” exploitation. If people care so much, buy a regular case and give $5 directly to the organization of your choice. Don’t spend exactly the same amount you were going to anyhow just to get a badge to proclaim for the next year or two what a great person you are, you’re not.

The only upshot to these exploitative products is as often as not they wind up in massive overstock and you can grab them for much cheaper down the road. For example, my household recently scored a Cannon digital camera with printer for $30 less than just the same non-pink version of the camera would have cost us. The model was no longer current and Cannon was still sitting on stacks of pink digicams and pink printers, so we got a very good deal, even if they’re pink wink

Posted by Code Monkey in Midstate New York on September 30, 2009 at 5:11 AM (PDT)

2

Code Monkey - as much as I (and we) sincerely appreciate your comments, which are far more often than not insightful - attacking products designed with charitable objectives as “exploitation” is really riding the fine edge. For companies such as this one, the choice really comes down to “make zero products with charitable donations” or “make a few products with charitable donations,” and the vast majority of companies choose the former path.

If everyone did that, the only choice would be to take your “buy a regular case and give $5” solution, which would more likely than not result in a lot of people buying cases and virtually none making the corresponding donation. Putting the cases (or other products) out there simultaneously gets the Komen logo out there to raise awareness, and guarantees that at least some of those donations actually get made. It’s a risk on the company’s part to have to create, stock, and then (as you note) to eventually clear out the unsold units and still make donations. To knock those that are trying to increase charitable donations in some way, small or large, just seems a bit… misplaced.

Posted by Jeremy Horwitz in East Amherst, NY, USA on September 30, 2009 at 7:45 AM (PDT)

3

I appreciate the opposite viewpoint, and have at times said much the same thing, but a crass sticking of a pink ribbon icon on a product and giving less than a cup of coffee’s price so both Belkin and the end-user can pat themselves on the back, yeah, that’s exploitation in my book. Belkin, heck, just about all case makers, earn obscene margins on these mass produced Chinese trinkets. If Belkin cares so much, let them run a promotion where they give $2.50 to breast cancer charities for *any* purchase of their current model cases during breast cancer awareness month, not just this stunt (for which they’re probably more than offsetting the donation by adjustment of the wholsale cost).

I even think that it’s good to draw attention to worthy charities even when the actual donation amount is insignificant, I just don’t consider this case such an example.

Sorry if the tone seems as though I’m slamming charity itself, I’m merely slamming these self-congratulatory products that exist only to let people and corporations tell themselves they’re making a difference when they’re not.

It’s like how you look and see that Starbucks has started offering several FairTrade certified coffee varieties at similar prices to non-FairTrade certified varieties and you think, hey, that’s good. I can still buy Starbucks and be certain the farmers are making a living wage. Then you see they have a (Product)Red variety now sitting on the shelf next to the FairTrade varieties, but before you start to think that’s also good, you should pay attention and notice their (Product)Red variety to support Africa isn’t FairTrade certified and so you realize that the minor difference to the bottom line to take part in the well publicized (Product)Red campaign wasn’t also worth paying the African farmers a fair price in the first place… It’s cynical at best: Starbucks knows that less well publicized FairTrade program is only known and cared about by a small, well informed slice of the population, but by taking a small hit to their bottom line on those varieties, they can capture our sales that would otherwise go elsewhere. Conversely, the (Product)Red program is well publicized and pimped by celebrities, Starbucks knows they can generate extra sales just by donating a pittance to the charity while gouging the same local farmers they claim to be helping.

If a corporation or person wants to be charitable, be charitable, don’t just make an advertising campaign (corporate or personal) out of it is all I’m saying.

Posted by Code Monkey in Midstate New York on September 30, 2009 at 8:31 AM (PDT)

4

“Don’t spend exactly the same amount you were going to anyhow just to get a badge to proclaim for the next year or two what a great person you are, you’re not”

You know nothing of the people who are buying these products - do NOT judge them. You don’t have the right to, you don’t know them - remember that.

“my household recently scored a Cannon digital camera with printer for $30 less than just the same non-pink version of the camera would have cost us. The model was no longer current and Cannon was still sitting on stacks of pink digicams and pink printers, so WE GOT A VERY GOOD DEAL, even if they’re pink”

So you’d rather buy the cheaper option than spend more on the standard item - regardless of whether a charitable donation was made as a result of your purchase? That says a thousand words about the kind of person you are…

“a crass sticking of a pink ribbon icon on a product and giving less than a cup of coffee’s price so both Belkin and the end-user can pat themselves on the back, yeah, that’s exploitation in my book”

“I even think that it’s good to draw attention to worthy charities even when the actual donation amount is insignificant, I just don’t consider this case such an example”

One paragraph the size of the donation does matter, the next it doesn’t. Hypocritical, anyone?? And what does constitute a good example of a product that carries a charitable donation? Please, do elaborate.

“I’m merely slamming these self-congratulatory products”

Self-congratulatory, or a statement that someone is aware of the cause and wishes to support it and make others aware? Once again, a sweeping statement made in ignorance with no basis in fact.

And remember - YOU don’t consider this case a good example. Your right to have that opinion, but it does seem very wrong to criticise those that think otherwise and purchase this instead of a standard case. Would you rather the charity receive NO donation at all??

“To knock those that are trying to increase charitable donations in some way, small or large, just seems a bit… misplaced.”

Well said, Mr. Horwitz. Small or large, a donation is a donation, of which I’m sure whatever charity in question is grateful for.

Bottom line - you don’t like/don’t feel it will make a difference/think it’s misguided, don’t buy. Don’t criticise others for doing so.

Posted by N. on October 1, 2009 at 1:27 PM (PDT)

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