DRM-free reaction: Press, analysts, competitors and bloggers | iLounge News

News

DRM-free reaction: Press, analysts, competitors and bloggers

Below are several quotes we’ve rounded up following Apple and EMI’s announcement of DRM-free music on the iTunes Store. You can read opinions from iLounge editors, and leave your own, here.

“What today’s news does make clear is that our future may soon be free from the onerous rules that treated digital music as if it were the industry’s thieving stepchild. In my view, that’s even better that being able to download Sgt. Pepper on demand.”—Steven Levy, Newsweek

“Only Jobs has the power and the cojones to make such a move. Only Jobs could so boldly rip down the system he had previously built—the iTunes music store, which is the most-successful online store (perhaps the only one), which was built on copy-protected music, and force the music industry to follow suit.”—Leander Kahney, Wired

“Consumers have indicated [having DRM-free music] is important to them so Zune has been working with a variety of partners to head in this direction. This is a time of transition for the music industry and Microsoft is committed to striking a balance between delivering the best consumer experience while still protecting the rights of the content owners.”—Microsoft spokesperson

“So much for accusations that Jobs was full of sh*t with his ‘Thoughts on Music’ essay. Clearly, Apple is willing to embrace DRM-free music sales, and they’re not going to wait for all of the major labels to agree before going forward with it.”—John Gruber, Daring Fireball

“This is a great PR win for Apple and Steve Jobs. Apple was seen as the company delivering DRM free music to consumers, a move that will only increase their overall mindshare and of course, mindshare has a funny way of becoming more marketshare. It also goes a long way to address regulators in Europe complaining about the iPod’s lack of interoperability.”—Michael Gartenberg, Jupiter Research

“F*cking brilliant.”—Damon Albarn, frontman of Blur, Gorillaz and The Good, The Bad, and The Queen

“If you’re a major that doesn’t have DRM-free music, you look pretty challenged. This will put pressure on the other majors. Hopefully many other [online] retailers, including ourselves, will get licensed over time.”—David Pakman, CEO of eMusic

“This appears to be the final acknowledgment on the record companies’ part that the guiding principles of their digital distribution strategies have been fundamentally flawed.”—Ken Hertz, music industry lawyer

“So we say go out there and buy DRM-free music from iTunes. Is it perfect? No. It could be Lossless and it could be the same price as DRM’d tunes, and we sure would like to see those lawsuits stop. But this is a monumental step, and if it’s successful we’ll certainly see other major labels following suit by releasing their catalogs without DRM. If the demand is there, the supply will arrive in due time.”—Adam Frucci, Gizmodo

“This moves us closer than ever to the day when consumers will be able to buy their favorite music via Rhapsody and enjoy it on their iPod or any other music-playing device. We look forward to working with EMI and the rest of the music industry to bring DRM-free, interoperable music to consumers in the months ahead.”—Rob Glaser, CEO of RealNetworks

“Since you’re not lifting your DRM on everything, you’ll have a mixed library, which will also be a challenge. It’s a first step in a very long process.”—Shannon Cross, Soleil Cross Research

“I could not be happier right now. I really hope Apple decides to make a web-based version of the iTunes store so that I can buy iTunes tracks in the future using Ubuntu Linux.”—Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing

“Short term, there will be a perception that this may also have a negative impact on iPod sales, as consumers can now play EMI’s iTunes downloads on any digital music player. It is important to note that non-iPod MP3 players will not sync with iTunes the same way iPods do. Our belief is the success of the iPod is not because consumers are locked on the iTunes platform, but its success has been because of the total device and iTunes experience.”—Gene Munster, Piper Jaffray

“It’s problematic. EMI haven’t tested it enough, so they don’t know what the market reaction is going to be. The issues are will (unprotected) MP3s help expand the market, and how will it affect piracy? We just don’t know.”—Unnamed music executive

“This is a true earthquake. I can imagine that some executives at other record labels have had to change their underwear today. As Jobs said, there are leaders and there are followers, and EMI has clearly staked out first place in this new market. And Apple, as often, has been the prime mover in this change.”—Kirk McElhearn, Kirkville

“I think it’s very clever for EMI to bundle copyability with higher quality: the latter may hold far more appeal for consumers. And let’s face it, selling upgraded versions of media products to old customers is a well-established part of the entertainment business.”—Brian Chin, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

“Microsoft is a master deal maker. No company partners like Microsoft. It’s disturbing to see those ‘edgy thinkers’ doing so much thinking and not taking enough action. Microsoft should have been one step ahead of Apple, with a DRM-free catalog of EMI music in Windows Media Audio. More music players, devices and PC software support WMA than AAC.”— Joe Wilcox, Microsoft Watch

“The Consumer Electronics Association applauds Apple and EMI Music for recognizing what consumers really want out of their digital music experience—high resolution recordings worthy of both home and on-the-go listening, along with the freedom to move music among devices. This is the future of digital entertainment.”—Gary Shapiro, CEA President and CEO

“DRM is an embedded feature of the subscription services and they can’t run their business without it. Now they are stuck with it for the bulk of their services and the disadvantages of DRM are going to plague them.”—Phil Leigh, Inside Digital Media

“Is Apple simply fashioning its own hangman’s noose? If the other major record companies follow suit, the one big advantage of the entire Apple “digital ecosystem”—iTunes, the iPod, and Apple TV—essentially becomes null and void. Jobs says Apple’s superior design will keep the company’s software and hardware at the top of the must-have list for digital media. For the iPod, maybe—but for the just-launched Apple TV, the answer isn’t as straightforward.”—John Falcone, Crave

“This is a very big victory. We wanted the businesses [Apple and music companies] to take this seriously, and they have.—Torgeir Waterhouse, Consumer Council of Norway

« Sony offers iPod dock for BRAVIA systems

EU launches iTunes antitrust probe »

Related Stories

Comments

1

“Consumers have indicated [having DRM-free music] is important to them so Zune has been working with a variety of partners to head in this direction. This is a time of transition for the music industry and Microsoft is committed to striking a balance between delivering the best consumer experience while still protecting the rights of the content owners.”—Microsoft spokesperson

Talk about hypocrisy! Didn’t M$ decide to invent a NEW standard for the Zune instead of sticking with the other standard that they created?

“Microsoft is a master deal maker. No company partners like Microsoft. It’s disturbing to see those ‘edgy thinkers’ doing so much thinking and not taking enough action. Microsoft should have been one step ahead of Apple, with a DRM-free catalog of EMI music in Windows Media Audio. More music players, devices and PC software support WMA than AAC.”—Joe Wilcox, Microsoft Watch

Wow. They seem to go out on a limb to never give credit when credit is due.

As for the comment “more players support WMA than AAC”, does that mean more varieties of players (I’m sure that’s what he’s actually saying) or more players in terms of numbers? If so, wouldn’t that be the market leader, the iPod? So that statement would be false, wouldn’t it?

Posted by ahMEmon on April 3, 2007 at 10:46 AM (CDT)

2

Leave it to Cory Doctorow to spoil a great announcement with trivial, irrelevant nonsense.

Nobody cares about your crummy hobbiest desktop.

Posted by dasmb on April 3, 2007 at 11:00 AM (CDT)

3

It is true that no company partners like Microsoft, except for, maybe, Oracle. MS is the worst “partner” one would ever want. Apple is arrogant, but they make superior products and create a superior experience. Apple owns digital entertainment except for gaming. They’re, no doubt 3 years out on innovation and business models for digital entertainment. I don’t care if a Zune can wash my dog and cook breakfast, no one at Microsoft has the balls to do what Steve Jobs is doing. (Note: MS had some PR weenie quote for for the DRM free reaction.)

Posted by DrakeBullet on April 3, 2007 at 11:04 AM (CDT)

4

If I were a DAP hardware developer I would be working overtime on a firmware update to support AAC.

Posted by Galley in Greenville, SC on April 3, 2007 at 11:24 AM (CDT)

5

How can the council of Norway consider this a victory?

I wonder what other event that they had no hand in that they consider a victory.

I have a boss here at work that should be on the council of Norway.

Posted by unreal on April 3, 2007 at 12:11 PM (CDT)

6

“If I were a DAP hardware developer I would be working overtime on a firmware update to support AAC.”

All in all, this announcement should kick the entire industry into a major state of flux which will benefit the consumer and some of the corporations. Stores will now be scrambling to negotiate to distribute these open files. If Apple stays ahead of the curve in procuring deals, then the hardware manufacturers will have to support them. If other stores provide better price and/or file formats, then Apple may be forced to support the consumer more fully. Finally introducing the potential of full interoperability is very promising for us as consumers.

Posted by Code Monkey in Midstate New York on April 3, 2007 at 12:12 PM (CDT)

7

I agree with dasmb—why elevate Cory Doctorow’s ridiculous statement by publishing it with these other quotes? Even using AJAX, a Web version of iTunes would provide a horrible user experience compared with the software version of iTunes.

Posted by technolawyer on April 3, 2007 at 12:40 PM (CDT)

8

why elevate Cory Doctorow’s ridiculous statement by publishing it with these other quotes?

Cory makes Mac fanboys sad.

Thanks to ilounge for the media quote round up.  It’s always fun to see the spectrum of reaction all laid out after a big event.

Posted by superape on April 3, 2007 at 1:19 PM (CDT)

9

“Only Jobs has the power and the cojones to make such a move. Only Jobs could so boldly rip down the system he had previously built—the iTunes music store, which is the most-successful online store (perhaps the only one), which was built on copy-protected music, and force the music industry to follow suit.”

Except Jobs did not actually do this.  EMI decided to do it and offered the deal to Apple.  It was not Jobs revolutionizing anything.  It was someone else coming to him with a plan in place, because iTunes leads the digital download space. 

There’s a big difference between Jobs demanding that record companies change their ways and a record company coming to him with an idea and saying “Do you want in?” 

There’s nothing worse in tech journalism than fanboy disease.

Posted by malren on April 3, 2007 at 3:34 PM (CDT)

10

Interestingly, I found myself locked out of my purchased iTunes songs just this evening. See, I’d changed my email Apple ID from one email address to another last year, with no effects whatsoever. Then suddenly tonight I found my purchased iTunes tracks unplayable. After trying multiple times to RE-authorize my machines, I realized that the Apple ID had reverted back to the old email address!

It would have been one thing if some glitch caused me to be temporarily unable to purchase tracks through iTS. But the fact that my machines became completely unathorized, even temporarily, only proves that the nasty claims by the anti-DRM camp are true! No more iTunes purchases for me till they’re ALL DRM-free!


~Laer

Posted by Laer on April 4, 2007 at 5:15 AM (CDT)

11

malren, you don’t know all the facts. If you read the transcript (available at Apple Insider), EMI’s CEO states that Jobs/Apple expressed their displeasure with DRM to EMI long before Jobs’ open letter in February. And speaking of which, how about that open letter, which preceded EMI’s decison?

I don’t know all the facts either, but I know enough to know that Apple does deserve at least partial credit.

Posted by technolawyer on April 4, 2007 at 4:28 PM (CDT)

12

superape, Cory Doctorow is more of a Web 2.0 pundit than a technology pundit so most Mac fanboys probably don’t know who he is. Or at least didn’t until this week. Thanks to his strange non-sequitur, they know about him now. See:
http://www.geekculture.com/joyoftech/joyarchives/944.html

Posted by technolawyer on April 5, 2007 at 12:59 AM (CDT)

If you have a comment, news tip, advertising inquiry, or coverage request, a question about iPods/iPhones/iPad or accessories, or if you sell or market iPod/iPhone/iPad products or services, read iLounge's Comments + Questions policies before posting, and fully identify yourself if you do. We will delete comments containing advertising, astroturfing, trolling, personal attacks, offensive language, or other objectionable content, then ban and/or publicly identify violators.

Commenting is not available in this channel entry.
Sign up for the iLounge Weekly Newsletter

Email:

Recent News

Recent Reviews

Recent Articles

Sign up for the iLounge Weekly Newsletter

Email:

iLounge is an independent resource for all things iPod, iPhone, iPad, and beyond.
iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, Apple TV, Mac, and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc.
iLounge is © 2001 - 2014 iLounge, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy