Mix: Apple music biz, subscription model, Engadget awards | iLounge News

2014 iPad iPhone iPod Buyers' Guide from iLounge.com

News

Mix: Apple music biz, subscription model, Engadget awards

Author's pic

By LC Angell

Contributing Editor
Published: Monday, January 3, 2005
News Categories:

Steve Lidberg of Pacific Crest Securities says that a flash memory-based iPod, and new initiatives in 2005, should help Apple grow its music business to more than $5 billion by 2006.

Apple rivals Napster and Yahoo say the iTunes Music Store’s 99-cent pricing is the wrong formula for digital music, and that subscription-based models are the future.

The fourth-generation iPod was named “Gadget of the Year” in Engadget’s 2004 awards. Picking up the “Disappointment of the Year” and “Worst Gadget of the Year” honors was Sony’s Network Walkman NW-HD1.

« iPod flash Concepts Winner Announced

Monster iCruze sees delay, $50 price increase »

Related Stories

Comments

21

Struddie,

Normally you cannot burn on-demand, etc. tracks without paying for the privilege.  Napster costs $0.79/track, and Real does the same thing.  It’s cheaper than iTunes, yes, but you also have to pay the monthly rate.


I personally would like to have an “unlimited” number of songs.  I don’t think $180/year is a huge expense for this privilege, although I do wish there were some plan to allow you to cheaply pay-off all of your downloaded tracks if you decide to end your subscription.  Something like buying in bulk.  I doubt this will happen, but I would be game.

Posted by dethbrakr in Tacoma, WA on January 5, 2005 at 7:01 AM (PDT)

22

“The only way you can guarantee that th music you “buy” will be listenable 10 years from now on your device of choice is to buy it in physical form, probably CD or SACD. Relying on either the Apple or the Rhapsody/Napster subscription model is a pipedream.”

Or you can burn it to a CD. 

Subscriptions services are fine for some users.  But the point of the article is that those in charge of subscriptions services believe they’ll put iTMS under.  There’s room in the market for both models. 

On a side note - please post without always citing other people’s responses.  From the other post I’ve read, you wait until people post, then use their comments as a point of reference for your own ideas.  No one minds if you post, but please do so in a way that does not put down others.  If you want for your thoughts to be respected, please respect others who also post.  Just common courtesy.  Thanks.

Posted by ipod21 on January 5, 2005 at 11:28 AM (PDT)

23

From the other post I’ve read, you wait until people post, then use their comments as a point of reference for your own ideas. No one minds if you post, but please do so in a way that does not put down others.

Posting an introduction to your message is called context”.

Forgive me for being blunt, but did you or did you not just quote something I wrote, then contradict it?

Or you can burn it to a CD.

The problem with this approach is that I have yet to see any satisfactory license from Apple that says the CDs you burn are yours, in perpetuity, and are not designed as “backup CDs” with no independent legal existence except as an adjunct to currently licensed iTMS files.

If I buy a CD, I know i can sell it, or leave it to my heirs (well, inflict it on my heirs!), and so on. I can legally make unlimited archival copies of the CD for my personal use. Not so with the backup discs produced by iTunes.

Given that their legal existence is hazy at best, a higher-fidelity approach would be to license the track from iTMS by paying your $1, then download a higher quality/lossless version from a p2p service and burn that. A disc produced using either method occupies equal legal footing.

Posted by Demosthenes on January 5, 2005 at 2:31 PM (PDT)

24

From the other post I’ve read, you wait until people post, then use their comments as a point of reference for your own ideas. No one minds if you post, but please do so in a way that does not put down others.

Posting an introduction to your message is called context”.

Forgive me for being blunt, but did you or did you not just quote something I wrote, then contradict it?

Or you can burn it to a CD.

The problem with this approach is that I have yet to see any satisfactory license from Apple that says the CDs you burn are yours, in perpetuity, and are not designed as “backup CDs” with no independent legal existence except as an adjunct to currently licensed iTMS files.

If I buy a CD, I know i can sell it, or leave it to my heirs (well, inflict it on my heirs!), and so on. I can legally make unlimited archival copies of the CD for my personal use. Not so with the backup discs produced by iTunes.

Given that their legal existence is hazy at best, a higher-fidelity approach would be to license the track from iTMS by paying your $1, then download a higher quality/lossless version from a p2p service and burn that. A disc produced using either method occupies equal legal footing.

Posted by Demosthenes on January 5, 2005 at 2:31 PM (PDT)

25

sorry for the double post - iPL is timing out :-(

Posted by Demosthenes on January 5, 2005 at 2:33 PM (PDT)

Page 2 of 2 pages  <  1 2

If you have a comment, news tip, advertising inquiry, or coverage request, a question about iPods/iPhones/iPad or accessories, or if you sell or market iPod/iPhone/iPad products or services, read iLounge's Comments + Questions policies before posting, and fully identify yourself if you do. We will delete comments containing advertising, astroturfing, trolling, personal attacks, offensive language, or other objectionable content, then ban and/or publicly identify violators.

Commenting is not available in this section entry.

Email:

Recent News

Recent Reviews

Recent Articles

Shop for Accessories: Cases, speakers, chargers, etc.