Mix: Norway, ViddyUp, Cell phones, One Man Band | iLounge News

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Mix: Norway, ViddyUp, Cell phones, One Man Band

Apple has until June 21 to change the terms of conditions of its iTunes Music Store in Norway. “If Apple does not make its songs playable on all music devices by June 21, it faces fines which would then be followed by court action,” according to reports.

The developer of Podner, the iPod video conversion application for Mac OS X, has changed the software’s name to ViddyUp. The app also gains SubRip (SRT) subtitle support, more informative error display and minor appearance tweaks.

A recent survey, commissioned by handset maker Nokia, found that 67% of those questioned expect their cell phone to replace their MP3 player. The survey also found that 44% of people use their phones as their main camera.

One Man Band,” Pixar’s new short film from the recently released “Cars” movie, is now available from the iTunes Music Store for $1.99. The short tells the “humorous and heartwarming story of two rival street performers, Bass and Treble, who vie for the attentions (and coin) of a young peasant girl, Tippy.”

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Comments

1

Why should iTMS tracks have to be made playable on other players when tracks from the other online music outlets are not playable on the iPod?

Posted by cybergoober on June 12, 2006 at 11:47 AM (PDT)

2

Hey, why were at it, my Playstation games should be able to play in my Xbox and I should be able to order a Big Mac at Burger King.

Posted by nosedive51 on June 12, 2006 at 11:58 AM (PDT)

3

#1 has a point but #2’s argument is pure fallacy, considering that video games are hardware-specific and music is not. And you can’t buy a Big Mac at Burger King just as you can’t buy a Beatles songs on iTunes. If Burger King licenses it from McDonald’s, then it’ll be possible. smile

Posted by Gerhard on June 12, 2006 at 12:28 PM (PDT)

4

“considering that video games are hardware-specific and music is not.”

So, tell me, who made the rule that music cannot be hardware specific?

Posted by The Raven on June 12, 2006 at 12:54 PM (PDT)

5

BTW, kiss the iTMS goodbye, Norway.

Posted by The Raven on June 12, 2006 at 12:55 PM (PDT)

6

“So, tell me, who made the rule that music cannot be hardware specific?”

It’s not a rule, it’s the way the games are developed. If someone made an emulator for Xbox than you probably could play playstation 2 games in it. I’m not sure, I’m no expert. The music sold by iTunes has DRM, video games don’t, and that’s why the arguments are totally different.

Posted by adam on June 12, 2006 at 1:44 PM (PDT)

7

Here’s the point you apple fanboys are missing:

The only reason you can’t play every other DRM’d song in the world on your iPod is because Apple refuses to implement WMA support on it. Microsoft would license WMA to Apple yesterday (and probably for close to nothing as it would give WMA based music services a huge injection of cash). There is no technical hurdle for why you can’t play Urge or Yahoo! Music tracks on your iPod, just Apple’s anti-consumer B.S.

The reason you can’t play your iTunes tracks on other players is, again, Apple’s obstinate refusal to license the Fairplay DRM. It would be a matter of a firmware update all around for everybody’s services to get along and let real market forces prove who has the better music store.

Instead, Apple gets the benefit of leveraging the better hardware solution into an arguably undeserved market dominance in the downloads business.

Apple can pull out of Norway if they want, but then it will be the U.K., and eventually pretty much all the markets. If Apple really has the best hardware and music store then opening it up won’t change anything, but if they don’t…

Posted by Code Monkey in Midstate New York on June 12, 2006 at 2:14 PM (PDT)

8

What about Mac users? They cannot use Microsoft’s DRM.

Posted by Daveoc64 on June 12, 2006 at 2:21 PM (PDT)

9

“What about Mac users? They cannot use Microsoft’s DRM.”

Again, look to Apple for why there is no Macintosh support for the DRM. The iPod market is big enough that if Apple wanted to work with Microsoft to develop a Mac version of a current WMP it would happen. The only reason it hasn’t happened is that Apple refuses to let it happen.

Beyond that, face reality, mac users are an insignificant percentage of even iTunes and iPod users. It’s barely worth Apple’s time to support their Mac base when it comes to iPods and the iTMS anymore.

Anyhow, where would the offense be if, gods forbid, windows users were to have access to all the media in their iTunes but Mac users were stuck with just the iTMS? You chose a numerically unimportant platform because you thought it offered advantages over Windows, you can’t very well expect there won’t be consequences.

Posted by Code Monkey in Midstate New York on June 12, 2006 at 2:50 PM (PDT)

10

“Beyond that, face reality, mac users are an insignificant percentage of even iTunes and iPod users. It’s barely worth Apple’s time to support their Mac base when it comes to iPods and the iTMS anymore”.

Surely the case is the same for MP3 players and software other than iTunes? They are insignificant so why should they be supported?

Why does Microsoft produce Windows Media Player sans DRM if Apple will not let them make WMP for Mac?

Posted by Daveoc64 on June 12, 2006 at 3:07 PM (PDT)

11

“playable on all music devices…”

So I guess if you’re in Norway, and buy a CD, the seller must provide a means of playing that CD in your 8 track player?

ITMS music is no different than any traditional music medium with regard to portability - if you wanted to play an LP on your cassette deck, you copied it yourself. If you want to play something from ITMS on a non-iPod device, you burn it to CD and then copy it to that other device.

Are Norwegians truly so clueless?

Posted by m.s. on June 12, 2006 at 3:18 PM (PDT)

12

My CD player won’t play cassettes. Who’ll join me in a class-actioon lawsuit against CD player manufacturers?

Posted by LukeA on June 12, 2006 at 3:30 PM (PDT)

13

Quote: “Why should iTMS tracks have to be made playable on other players when tracks from the other online music outlets are not playable on the iPod?”

Tracks purchased from the RealPlayer Music Store play perfectly fine on the iPod, and they’re 50% higher quality to boot!

Posted by Galley in Greenville, SC on June 12, 2006 at 5:33 PM (PDT)

14

I am glad that the iPod is not polluted by supporting Windows Media. However I know lots of folks that would like Vorbis support.

I think Apple can win either way. There’s a great moral tale by Chinese philosopher Chuang Tzu called ‘Three in the Morning’. It’s about a monkey trainer who says that his monkeys get three measures of chestnuts in the morning and four in the afternoon.

But the monkey complian bitterly. So the trainer makes a change: they can have four measures in the morning and three in the afternoon. And the monkeys were satisfied.

Posted by Pikemann_Urge on June 12, 2006 at 5:44 PM (PDT)

15

Ahhhh, Codemonkey is back with his Apple bashing. Again, why should Apple be forced to support other players and other music stores, if as like you said about mac’s “Their an insignificant percentage” of music players out there??  See Codemonkey, Think before you write…..Point is WMA sucks, and why should Apple bend-over backwards to support a has-been format?

Posted by Matrixsjd on June 12, 2006 at 6:28 PM (PDT)

16

Point is WMA sucks, and why should Apple bend-over backwards to support a has-been format?

And why don’t you remind us why AAC as a format is so much better than all else, aside from the point that iPods play them.

Posted by flatline response on June 12, 2006 at 9:02 PM (PDT)

17

Did I say it was better then all else even once in my last post? No, it’s a good format, and may not be the best, but from what I’ve learned and heard, it’s better then WMA ever has been or ever will be.

Posted by Matrixsjd on June 12, 2006 at 9:12 PM (PDT)

18

Microsoft would license WMA to Apple yesterday

I’m not so sure about this. Not even Microsofts Widows Media Player for Mac can play DRM protected WMA on my Mac and neither does Flip4Mac. Why?

Posted by Per Arne Flø on June 12, 2006 at 11:44 PM (PDT)

19

...but from what I’ve learned and heard, it’s better then WMA ever has been or ever will be.

And your proof is? My own critical experiences with both have shown to me that they’re extremely close in sonic performance. Aside from AAC rips done with Nero, if anything iTunes AAC rips are as flawed as WMA rips with WMP or MusicMatch. Most casual ears would be hard pressed to tell any significant difference, and critical ears would find faults with either.

Assuming by ‘better’ you’re referring to SQ, no you didn’t implicitly say AAC was better than the rest (presumably when comparing lossy formats). But from my experiences, WMA hasn’t shown itself to be significantly worse than the rest of the non-AAC lossy formats (if anything, I think it tends to sound better than most, even with its more abrupt top end roll-off). If AAC (presumably Apple/iTunes AAC) is, as you say, far superior to WMA, then it stands to reason that you must feel that it’s also vastly superior to all the rest, if I use my experiences with other media formats as a baseline. THAT’S how I can say that you must believe that AAC (in lossy flavor) is better than the remainder of the lossy world.

Posted by flatline response on June 13, 2006 at 1:09 AM (PDT)

20

“Ahhhh, Codemonkey is back with his Apple bashing.”

No, I’m back with the bitter pill of reality, that Apple is a numerically insignificant computer platform and that the argument that Apple shouldn’t allow WMA support on the iPod or windows iTunes until they support it on the Mac is a not a justifiable stand to take.

On Windows, it’s evidently quite easy to hook into the WMP engine for DRM validation from external programs as this is what Yahoo!, Napster, etc. do. Ergo, the windows version of iTunes could, with an update, support WMA-DRM with relatively little effort on Apple’s part.

This isn’t about how WMA is better than AAC or Ogg Vorbis rules the world. It’s about how Apple takes away *your* choice to play what you want on a player for which there is no other reason than *Apple’s* selfish interests to justify it. My audio experience with the iPod is certainly not better because I cannot choose to listen to Ogg, FLAC, musepack or, yes, WMA on it, and neither is yours.

Apple should compete through good software and hardware, not by adopting protectionist policies that are short sighted and, in the long run, doomed to failure.

Posted by Code Monkey in Midstate New York on June 13, 2006 at 5:45 AM (PDT)

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