Mix: Podshanking, iTunes limits, ShasPod, shuffle headphones | iLounge News

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Mix: Podshanking, iTunes limits, ShasPod, shuffle headphones

 PodShanking is a method for direct iPod-to-iPod song transfers via earphone ports with a minimum of equipment and software. However, the transfers are in real time.

 The latest version of iTunes (4.7.1) apparently adds limits to the number of people that can stream your music in a 24 hour period to five.

 The ShasPod is a 20GB iPod loaded with Talmud lectures given by Rabbi Dovid Grossman of Los Angeles. It sells for $399.

 iPod shuffle owners are finding all kinds of places to stick the tiny device. Jim Younkin simply crammed his inside a pair of $1 thrift-store headphones.

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Comments

1

Yeah, that’s why I still use 4.7.  Also, I don’t have a shuffle just a 3G so it really doesn’t matter.

Posted by ipodman715 on March 17, 2005 at 10:47 AM (PDT)

2

LIke BoingBoing said, it’s like a boombox that won’t turn on if too many people are in the room.

The music business used to be about getting people to listen to music.  Now they’re about getting people to not listen to music. 

Next, they’ll try to outlaw speakers so we all have to listen to headphones.

Posted by altcountryman in WI on March 17, 2005 at 11:03 AM (PDT)

3

I don’t get it.  What difference does it make whether 5 people are listening to your music or 10… or whether 3 people listened to your music that day or 20.  What difference does it make if I burn 10 CDs versus 7?  If I can burn 1, I can burn a million.  Then again, if I really wanted to burn a million I wouldn’t be using iTunes.

Did somebody actually crunch some numbers and come to the conclusion that allowing people to burn their playlists 7 times instead of 10 actually affected the bottom line?

If you don’t prevent it outright, then you’re really accomplishing nothing by letting them do it a “little bit”.  They know that they can’t stop it completely (though they would love to) so it must just somehow make them feel better to know that they can make it as painful for you as possible.

They have been given the option to set the dial between 0 and unlimited, and they keep tweaking that dial, but in reality, all the numbers in between serve no purpose.  They just seem to ignore the fact that its an on-off switch and off isn’t an option right now.

DRM is simply getting out of hand.  These execs are using it not to serve a purpose (face it, it has absolutely no effect on piracy) but because they can.  They are trying to exercise control that is entirely unnecessary and uncalled for.  Are they simply trying to condition people as they slowly take away our rights?  This just makes no sense.

This nitpicking of numbers just shows that these execs want the control but there isn’t a need for it so they really don’t know what to do with it.

It’s hard not to believe that they’re just testing the treshold of how little people will accept.

Posted by Wolffe on March 17, 2005 at 11:07 AM (PDT)

4

Apparently they don’t want people in dorms using this like “temporary file sharing.” They only want families/homes/individuals with multiple computers use this. In other words, YOUR personal use, not everyone on your LAN.

That’s too bad—sharing music with everyone in your building sounded like fun. Now that still works, but the libraries you see listed will change based on daily usage, instead of always listing everyone.

Posted by Nagromme on March 17, 2005 at 12:37 PM (PDT)

5

So if 4.7.1 adds these limits, will those of us with 4.6 still be able to have more than 5 people stream their music?  Is that how it works? 

Posted by Islareina in Missouri on March 17, 2005 at 5:09 PM (PDT)

6

I though “PodShanking” was someone getting “shanked” (aka stabbed) for their iPod. LOL! smile

Posted by FallN in New York, NY on March 18, 2005 at 12:30 AM (PDT)

7

ShasPod! Let Jews everywhere rejoice! Yay! smile

Posted by FallN in New York, NY on March 18, 2005 at 12:32 AM (PDT)

8

Though I tend to agree that limitations to what we can do with music we have legally purchased sucks. I think it should be mentioned that apple did fit for our rights when the playlist burns dropped from 10 to 7 and this article didn’t mention it. With the original DRM of iTunes, only 3 computers could be authorized to play music. When the music labels said they wanted to decrease the numbers of burns from 7 to 10, Apple said only if you increase the computers authorized to play to five.

Posted by studogvetmed in Loveland, CO on March 18, 2005 at 6:25 AM (PDT)

9

I don’t believe Apple is to blame at all.  Apple, as do all the other online music stores, just want to sell the music.  However they are in the hard spot where they must make the RIAA happy in order to get the music they want to sell, and they need to make their customers happy so that they will buy what they want to sell.

Regardless, doesn’t anyone see how absurd it is that they spent any time at all deciding bargaining over the fact that people should be allowed to burn 7 times versus 10?  Did someone actually lose sleep because out there, somewhere, *5* people were streaming music instead of 3?

What this tells me is that these insignificant numbers bothered SOMEONE in power enough to have them changed!  It just shows that the industry is not satisfied with the limited freedom they have already given.

These small changes will soothe them for a lttle while, but they are going to continue tightening that noose… slowly.  I am absolutely dreading what they have in store for us when the next generation of media takes over.

Posted by Wolffe on March 18, 2005 at 12:48 PM (PDT)

10

Caution! iTunes Music Store Users !

Someday you will wonder what happended to your “music-rights”.

Maybe the music industry decides to disallow burning, maybe even playing without paying.

*** YES, they can and did before, because you bought DRM-Files. They already changed the burning rights and sharing rights, and the amount of

computer you may use in the iTMS. Now Apple plays nice, but once they become powerful enough, they (and Music industry) will try to get the

best you have out of you (your money).

people buying music with Digital rights managment are MORONS (if they knew about it before buying) or they just don’t know about DRM (which

is an excuse).

ok, hate me, but remember what i said in 5 years when you realize that you don’t control what you payed for.

Now flame

Posted by Sergiusz 4G-20GB & Shuffle 512 MB on March 20, 2005 at 5:11 AM (PDT)

11

Actually, I agree with you for the most part Seriguzz. It’s true that due to ramapant pircay of a few the bulk of us, the PAYING, HONEST customers have to literally pay the price for the piracy of a few.

I’d like to round up all these pirate-kiddies hacking away on their parents computer or off at college, drag them into the streets and beat them with MC Hammer’s Single “Can’t Touch This”!

Boy it fries my bacon!

Posted by FallN in New York, NY on March 21, 2005 at 12:36 PM (PDT)

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