NASA creates iPhone-based chemical sensor | iLounge News

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NASA creates iPhone-based chemical sensor

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A NASA scientist has created a 30-pin accessory that allows an iPhone or iPod touch to be used as a chemical sensor. Jing Li, a physical scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center, along with other researchers in the Cell-All program in the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate, built the postage stamp-sized device, which packs 16 nanosensors that allow for detection and identification of low concentrations airborne ammonia, chlorine gas, and methane. Connected to an iPhone or iPod touch’s Dock port and used with a special app, the system can send detection data to another device over a cellular or Wi-Fi network. It is unknown whether the administration has plans for the system outside of proof-of-concept testing. [via Engadget]

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Comments

1

That’s great!  Maybe they can link this sensor to the iFart application in order to rate the foulness of one’s farts.

Posted by MBB on November 13, 2009 at 11:44 AM (CST)

2

Just like a government employee, develop something on a closed platform that has no future or use, outside of development for the sake of development. 

Thanks for wasting more tax dollars, maybe the ranks of the unemployed should grow by 1 more.

Posted by xing on November 13, 2009 at 11:53 AM (CST)

3

Actually, xing, NASA’s research explores technological possibilities that can lead to more pragmatic devices and processes and how to use existing technology in novel and money-saving ways. The sensor mentioned in this article demonstrates how off-the-shelf technology can be parlayed into useful scientific tools. In other words, NASA doesn’t have to build its own handheld computer with data transmission capabilities. That can save NASA a lot of money.

Stop thinking with your knee, jerk.

Posted by beetsnotbeats on November 13, 2009 at 12:11 PM (CST)

4

Actually, this is a perfecst use of the iPhone. Why waste money developing a portable platform when the iPhone can provide everything but the sensor. Work on the sensor, develop some software and now you have a portable device with storage, touch display, cell phone, WiFi and Bluetooth.

Posted by John on November 13, 2009 at 1:24 PM (CST)

5

Just wait for OS 3.2 ... I’m sure Apple will find a way to break the compatibility with it ;)

Posted by rockmyplimsoul on November 13, 2009 at 2:43 PM (CST)

6

Wow. The Star Trek Tricorder has now officially been created. Crazy!

Posted by DomArch on November 13, 2009 at 3:00 PM (CST)

7

Bottom line your never going to see the iPhone used for this on the shuttle, or any NASA mission. In fact you’ll never see an iPhone used for any official NASA items. Again it’s a waste of taxpayer recourses to develop without the possibility of use. If they want to develop a sensor put It on something they use in thier existing tech they have enough computer power on all thier existing stuff.

Again thanks for wasting tax payer money, that’s why private funds haven’t backed this because it’s not goning anywhere. Just nice free ad for apple on tax payer dime.

Posted by Xing on November 13, 2009 at 3:17 PM (CST)

8

Xing, you really don’t get it do you?  For one thing, this project was funded by and built for Homeland Security, so NASA’s funding didn’t go towards it and that also means it’s not a NASA product.  What makes you think that everything NASA develops goes on the shuttle anyways?  The shuttle is one of the cleanest environments anywhere in the galaxy, so why would they need a device to sense “airborne ammonia, chlorine gas, and methane”?  Please use some common sense next time and stop trolling around here.

-Me

Posted by brianbobcat on November 14, 2009 at 12:38 AM (CST)

9

The “special app” pictured in the photo is “iProRecorder”, by BIAS, a voice memo recording app. Thats funny…

Posted by MilMascaras on November 16, 2009 at 2:02 AM (CST)

10

Xing, if it proves useful and robust, it’ll get used.  Remember, at this point, it’s just research (hence the term “proof of concept.”)  There’s no need for it to get used.  They just wanted to answer the all-important question: “can it be done cheaply?”  And they answered it very well. 

The military is already using the Iphone/Touch. NASA uses laptops on the space shuttle and ISS.  There’s no reason they wouldn’t use Iphones/Touches if it suited their needs.  Just because you don’t see an immediate use of it, don’t think it isn’t being considered.

Posted by Tom on November 16, 2009 at 10:32 AM (CST)

11

Why here’s an example of one handheld gas detector already on the market OSHA & EPA certified for only $495, with data logging & all.

$495 that’s less than the price of an I phone

here’s what it tests for:


Handheld detector for nitrogen dioxide, ozone, chlorine, fluorine, bromine and other halogen gases. As well as sensing: 

Acetaldehyde 
Acetone 
Acetonitrile 
Acetylene Tetrabromide 
Alcohol 
Allyl Alcohol 
Ammonia 
Benzene 
Benzoyl Chloride 
Benzoyl Peroxide 
Butane 
Butanone (MEK) 
Butoxyethanol
Butyl Alcohol
Butyl Acetate
c-Allylglycidylether 
c-Chloroform 
c-Dichloroethyl Ether 
Camphor 
Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Tetrachloride 
Chloro-1-Nitropropane 
Chloroacetaldehyde 
Chlorobenzene 
Chloropicrin 
Chloroprene 
cl,1-Dichloro-1-Nitroethane Cumene
Cyclohexane 
Cyclohexanol 
Cyclohexanone 
Cyclopentadiene 
DDT 
Diacetone Alcohol 
Diasomethane 
Diborane
1,1 Dichloroethane
1,2 Dichloroethane 
Diethylamine 
Diethylamino Ethanol 
Dimethylamine 
Dimethylaniline 
Dimethylformamide
Dimethylhydrazine   Dinitrobenzene
Dinitroluene
Dipropylene Glycol Methyl Ether
Disobutyl Ketone
Epichlorhydrin
Ether
Ethoxyethanol
Ethyl Butyl Ketone
Ethyl Ether
Ethyl Bromide
Ethyl Formate
Ethyl Benzene
Ethyl Alcohol
Ethyl Chloride
Ethylamine
Ethylene Dichloride
Ethylene Oxide
Ethylenediamine
Formaledehyde
Furfuryl Alcohol
Gasoline
Glycol Monoethyl Ether
Heptane
Hexachloroethane
Hexane
Hexanone
Hydrogen Sulfide
Hydrogen Chloride
Hydrogen Bromide
Hydrogen
Isoamyl Alcohol
Isobutyl Alcohol
Isopropyl Alcohol
Isopropyl Glycidel Ether
Ketone
L.P. Gas
Lacquer Thinners
Methane
Methyl Acetylene
Methyl Cellosolve
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone(Hexone)
Methyl Butyl Ketone
Methyl Mercaptan
Methyl Chloroform   Methyl Alcohol
Methyl Chloride
Methyl n-Amyl Ketone
Methyl Ethyl Ketone
Methylal
Methylamine
Methylchclohexanol
Methylcyclohexane
Methylene Chloride
Naphtha
Napthalene
Natural Gas
Nitrobnzene
Nitrochlorobenzene
Nitroethane
Nitroglycerin
Nitromethane
Nitrotoluene
Pentane
Pentanone
Perchloroethylene
Petroleum Distillates
Phenylether
Propane
Propargyl Alcohol
Propylene Oxide
Propyne
Refrigerant R-502(Freon 502)
Refrigerant R-123(Freon 123)
Refrigerant R-22 (Freon 22)
Refrigerant R-11 (Freon 11)
Sulfur Dioxide
Tetrachloronaphthalene
Tetranitromethane
Toluene
1,1,1 Trichloroethane
1,1,2 Trichloroethane
Trichloroethylene
Trichloronaphthalene
Trichloropropane
Trinitrotoluene
Turpentine
Xylene

wow that’s a lot of stuff & the tax payers didn’t have to put up a dime to develop it. And cheaper than an iPhone.

Posted by Xing on November 16, 2009 at 1:22 PM (CST)

12

i have been using this stuff and i cant’t change this team think you alot

Posted by asproegypt on February 16, 2010 at 9:07 AM (CST)

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