NPD: iTunes retains U.S. music retail lead | iLounge News

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NPD: iTunes retains U.S. music retail lead

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By Charles Starrett

Contributing Editor
Published: Tuesday, August 5, 2008
News Categories: iTunes

According to the latest data from The NPD Group, iTunes remained the largest U.S.-based music retailer through the first half of 2008. From January to June, iTunes was the number one retailer, followed by Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Amazon, and Target. “We expect Apple will consolidate its lead in the retail music market, as CD sales continue to slow,” said Russ Crupnick, entertainment industry analyst for The NPD Group. “Amazon’s CD buyers tend to be older, so they haven’t abandoned the CD format to the extent seen in the average music buyer. Plus Amazon’s successful introduction of its digital download store will help the company improve its position in the future.” NPD’s rankings are based on purchases of CDs and a-la-carte digital music downloads, using an equivalency of 12 single-track downloads per CD, for retailers who sell digital music as single tracks. In April, Apple announced that it had passed Wal-Mart to become the top music retailer in the U.S., based on sales information from January and February of 2008.

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Comments

1

You’ll have to pry my CDs out of my cold, dead hands!

Posted by Galley in Greenville, SC on August 5, 2008 at 6:42 AM (PDT)

2

Cds are so a thing in the past. They will fade out like vinyl did back in then 60’s and 70’s and some of the 80’s. WHy spend the gas to go get them or pay more for the cd when you can have it right in the blink of an eye.

Posted by Nathan From Charlotte NC on August 5, 2008 at 7:24 AM (PDT)

3

Although CD sales are slowing, I don’t think the CD will disappear like other formats. I still prefer having a CD whenever possible, especially for my favorite artists. I enjoy the linear notes and other tidbits that accompany the disc.

I do, however, buy some of my music digitally from iTunes and Amazon (mostly random singles from artists who I don’t want to buy whole albums for), and there’s certainly something to be said about getting your tunes right now.

Though MP3s are pretty good, a lot of audiophiles will tell you that the quality doesn’t compare with CDs. Most audiophiles will stick with the CD (or vinyl) until there’s enough storage capacity to do lossless digital audio.

Posted by cxc273 on August 5, 2008 at 8:07 AM (PDT)

4

Vinyl with a download code for the mp3 versions packaged in is a fun way to get music if you have a working record player. Vinyls sound much better than either CDs or mp3s, and with the mp3s packaged with it you give someone the resources for both home listening and on-the-go. Personally, I hope that’s the future of music, though it is a long-shot.

Posted by Adam on August 5, 2008 at 8:33 AM (PDT)

5

Is 12 really the average number of songs on a CD?  More likely, it’s between 10 and 11.  Using 12 is just trying to make Apple appear to not be in the lead by as much as it really is…

Posted by dave on August 5, 2008 at 10:48 AM (PDT)

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