Real Network’s online petition backfires | iLounge News

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Real Network’s online petition backfires

Update: In an effort to thwart negative comments, Real has started a new petition without public comments available. The freedomofchoicemusic.org site now points to a new URL. This new petition currently has 35 signatures.

Yesterday Real Network’s launched the “Freedom of Choice” anti-Apple ad campaign, website and online petition in its efforts to stop Apple from keeping the iPod a “locked” platform. Today, the campaign has backfired with over 500 mostly anti-Real comments appearing on the petition’s website resulting in Real removing the link to freedomofmusicchoice.org on its website.

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Comments

21

Ha! Since you can’t read comments or email addresses, just see a total count, I’ll bet Real is running a Javascript to “sign” their own petition repeatedly!

Posted by m.s on August 17, 2004 at 3:51 PM (CDT)

22

Wow, I didn’t realize that people despised Real this much.  I would think that people owning an iPod would love to have different choices in where they buy music online.  If these comments are any indication…that’s not the case at all.

If you’ve ever had an iTunes Music Store problem (I have) you’ll know that Apple/iTunes/iTunes Music Store are not a “godsend”.

Maybe a company with a bit better public image will come along and do what Real has done…this closest format stuff is for the birds.

Posted by AMG on August 17, 2004 at 4:05 PM (CDT)

23

Email I just sent to Real Networks

congratulations copying iTunes right down to the music store icon. Your product looks like a failed highschool website project. Not to mention the pain in the ass it was to install and get it to connect over my network, and on another note why the f would Apple sit down and have a beer with you bastards? You stole your way back into the limelight for teh moment but hopefully you will all get a nice envelope of SARs.

Posted by DVNerd on August 17, 2004 at 4:11 PM (CDT)

24

Here’s my freedom of choice solution: I go buy a CD on the day of release (there like $9). Then I copy them to my Apple hard drive (using AAC) and my PC hard drive (using MP3). Then I sell the CD to SecondSpin for $5. So the whole CD cost $4. FREEDOM OF CHOICE, BABY! Give it a try.

Posted by montez on August 17, 2004 at 4:21 PM (CDT)

25

“I go buy a CD on the day of release (there like $9). Then I copy them (using AAC) and (using MP3). Then I sell the CD to SecondSpin for $5.”


You do realize this is ILLEGAL, I hope.  And that you’re giving music listeners a bad rep and giving the record companies more ammunition to abuse us.

There’s a fight going on between music listeners and the record companies for TRUE freedom of choice: our right to listen to music without copy-protection schemes like corrupt CDs, and DRM schemes like those from Apple and REAL.  That fight is a lot easier when we as listeners respect the record companie’s legitimate rights as well.

Posted by mportuesi on August 17, 2004 at 4:48 PM (CDT)

26

All they (record companies) care about is their first week sales. I buy the CD, I give my money to Best Buy, SoundScan records the sale in their little tracking book and then I do whatever I want with the CD I just bought. I could give it to my brother or throw it in teh garbage or anything else I feel. So how is buying an selling illegal? Where is the theft. I’m not downloading it for free (like we used to) or copying without paying. I paid for it,

If you think we are ever going to go back to the days of CD’s with zero copy protection, then send me your address and I’ll visit you in Dreamland.

Have a nice day.

Posted by Noise Inside my Head in Los Angeles, CA on August 17, 2004 at 5:11 PM (CDT)

27

Well, i just signed my petition.

It’s under the name “LMAO”

Posted by LMAO on August 17, 2004 at 5:45 PM (CDT)

28

I guess I’m missing something here.

This petition isn’t a popularity contest.  It’s not about whether Real is a nice company.  We all know they’ve earned a lot of hatred over the years, but that’s not the point.

The point, AISI, is simply whether Apple should lock up the iPod platform—whether it should be the only provider of songs for it.  Whether it should be a monopoly, in other words.

And I don’t think they should.  That doesn’t mean I hate Apple, or that I love Real, just that I agree with Real on this one issue.

All those folks who are simply making this a we-hate-Real campaign are missing the point.  Either that, or I am…?

Posted by Gidds in UK on August 17, 2004 at 6:19 PM (CDT)

29

“So how is buying an selling illegal? Where is the theft. I’m not downloading it for free (like we used to) or copying without paying. I paid for it,”

That isn’t. But keeping the music after you sold it technically is. Technically. However, you are right. That’s FAAAAAAAAAR from anything the RIAA can even detect or is worried about. Resold cds are perfectly fine. DRM in the disc itself isn’t even for that, it’s for people that rip it and give it away.

Posted by penguin on August 17, 2004 at 6:20 PM (CDT)

30

A note to mportuesi :: if you are one of the army of lawyers and lobbyists that the RIAA employs, then you are making big bucks defending them.  If not, please note that the record companies have been stealing from both the consumer and the artists that they ‘represent’ since god knows when.  Smells like karma to me.

Posted by hibiscusroto.com on August 17, 2004 at 7:24 PM (CDT)

31

Real sucks.

Posted by NetworkShadow on August 17, 2004 at 7:56 PM (CDT)

32

Apple has something like 1.5% of the music selling market, is it monopoly?

Posted by Zippy on August 17, 2004 at 8:34 PM (CDT)

33

All the guys that say Real sucks might be right, HOWEVER I think that the petition draws attention to a very important issue: Format incompatibility! I love Apple, have an iPod for years but it is fact that there is no standard for DRM protected digital music. I don’t carwe who wins the fight as long as I can play songs on the iPod, but I think it is time that the computer & mp3 player industrie sets one standard and I belive that through the initiative of Real, Apple might be pressed to agree on licensing Fair Play to others.

BTW: What’s wrong with half price music downloads? Guys, competition is ALWAYS a good thing.

Posted by DG on August 17, 2004 at 9:23 PM (CDT)

34

God, what a joke.  FreedomOfChoice eh?  FreedomOfChoice as long as it runs an MS Windows OS it would appear.  Oh, the irony.

Sean

Posted by Sean on August 17, 2004 at 9:31 PM (CDT)

35

LMAO - they couldn’t take the (inevitable) negative feedback so they cleared the old site and started anew?~! How is that in any way a “freedom of [speech]?!” That’s a huge slash in my eyes towards Real.

Posted by mongoos150 in Tucson, AZ on August 17, 2004 at 10:04 PM (CDT)

36

While I dislike REAL as much as the rest I still think that apple could use a little competition.  How long will the real songs be 50 cents anyway?  I hope long enough that apple lowers their prices.

Posted by me on August 17, 2004 at 10:40 PM (CDT)

37

Rob Glaser should just tell Apple that if they didn’t licence to him, he would jump off a nice high cliff. Well.. I think it just might work better then his current efforts.

Posted by One Mans Opinion on August 17, 2004 at 11:37 PM (CDT)

38

This is getting annoying. Real’s objective is not to provide fairness, it’s to desperately try to get money because they have never put out anything useful.

I do not see the problem with just using iTMS. It’s easier to use, and has a bigger selection than Rhapsody or any other competing store. And it’s not made by a company that proliferates adware, bad a/v codecs, and in general piss-poor products.

Oh, and all the people who continue saying that oppenents of Harmony are hopelessly clinging to Apple are f-ing out of their minds. I’m not clinging to iTMS out of loyalty, but because iTMS is a better piece of software than Real’s hunk of junk.

And I won’t even mention the fact that the only reason Real is able to do this is because they illegally hacked the iPod.

Posted by jbrez on August 17, 2004 at 11:43 PM (CDT)

39

I think Apple’s products are great but I think it’s sad how fanatic and childish people are responding to this issue.

The iTunes Music Store isn’t available here in Holland yet while Windows users can buy from plenty of download stores already. I bought a €340 device and should be able to legally download music for it. And I DO want to be able to buy an album from Real for $4,-.

Apple is showing a hell of lot of Microsoft behaviour with their iPod/iTunes stuff and I don’t like it.  And I’m surprised you people do.

Posted by Jay B. on August 18, 2004 at 1:04 AM (CDT)

40

the couple of you that wrote about competition is good, are right. I agree that competition is good, but only if it’s done ethically. I’m still quite on the fence with this because, while I’m glad there’s competition, I don’t like Real’s hacker tactic. Further more their “Freedom of Choice” just comes off disingenuous since they don’t give bother to support two other very significant OSes.

Posted by Starboard on August 18, 2004 at 1:37 AM (CDT)

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