RollingStone: Steve Jobs on iPod, iTunes and more | iLounge News

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RollingStone: Steve Jobs on iPod, iTunes and more

“Bringing iTunes to Windows was obviously a bold move. Did you do much hand-wringing over it?

I don’t know what hand-wringing is. We did a lot of thinking about it. The biggest risk was that we saw people buying Macs just to get their hands on iPods. Taking iPods to Windows - that was the big decision. We knew once we did that that we were going to go all the way. I’m sure we’re losing some Mac sales, but half our sales of iPods are to the Windows world already.”

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Comments

1

Interesting article - I recommend reading the whole story.

Posted by Sean on December 8, 2003 at 11:54 AM (CST)

2

Now if Jobs could just get the software to work better - without all of the CD drive brand incompatibilities (iTunes still won’t work on my machine), and the iTunes store firewall problems (still can’t access the store), then that would be great.  We don’t have these problems with people who are actually adept at writing PC software and know how to make websites work with PC-based firewalls.

But then again, they aren’t adept at writing PC software.

Still waiting for a version that works.

Posted by Z on December 8, 2003 at 3:31 PM (CST)

3

The best Steve Jobs story I’ve read in a while. Very good.

Posted by Pete on December 8, 2003 at 4:33 PM (CST)

4

I notice that Steve Jobs now thinks suing and bankrupting families for alleged copyright infringement is okay.

He’s come a long way since he and Woz used to go around Berkeley and Stanford selling blue boxes to rip off long distance phone calls.

http://www.woz.org/letters/pirates/10.html

“Once, Steve Jobs and I tried to make our first blue box call ever from a pay phone. This was while I was a student at Berkeley. Steve’s car had broken down about 1 AM while driving from Berkeley to his home in Los Altos where my Pinto was parked. We walked to a nearby gas station and were making our blue box call back to the dorms to get Draper to give us a lift.

We got very scared when the operator kept coming on the line. We didn’t yet have the right operator BS down pat. Then 2 cops pulled up. Steve’s hand, holding the blue box, was shaking. But our looks led the cops to search the bushes for drugs or something. With their backs turned, Steve passed me the blue box and I got it in my jacket pocket.

The cops then patted us down and found the blue box. We know we’d been caught. The cops asked what it was and I said “an electronic music synthesizer” and told them that you got tones by pusing the keyboard buttons. The cop asked what the red button (phone line seizing!) was for and Steve said “calibration.”“

Posted by SueHappyJobs on December 8, 2003 at 5:04 PM (CST)

5

That was a good article, though.

I understand why you’d say that, and maybe Jobs and Woz stole a few phone calls, but that’s a far cry from a world of people stealing music.  Any mistakes any one man has made doesn’t mean he can’t make a valid point.  Truth is truth.

Posted by Z on December 8, 2003 at 7:04 PM (CST)

6

Jobs and Woz didn’t just “steal a few calls” - their main source of income pre-Apple I was selling blue boxes to students to enable them to call home cheaply.

They travelled around doing a roadshow where they would go door-to-door, demonstrating how the blue boxes worked, Jobs doing some showmanship and calling weird foreign numbers. Then when the crowd were all worked up they would sell the boxes.

Imagine then if they had been criminally prosecuted, made into felons, and basically tabood for life. There might be no iPods! Sometimes the law is an a s s.

Posted by HistoryRepeating on December 8, 2003 at 7:21 PM (CST)

7

Please point me to the stories of families being bankrupted by RIAA lawsuit settlements. I would like to read one.

Posted by Chimpee on December 8, 2003 at 8:16 PM (CST)

8

“Please point me to the stories of families being bankrupted by RIAA lawsuit settlements”

You are conflating bankruptcy with settlement. If people don’t settle then for some of them the lilihood is that they would be bankrupted, or forced to sell their primary residence. So they settle and pay the RIAA mobsters their juice. The RIAA are extracting money with menaces, plain and simple.

Are you seriously telling me you’re in favour of this strategy? How many industries have survived for long after suing their most avid consumers?

Posted by RIAAStooges on December 8, 2003 at 10:39 PM (CST)

9

He never said he agreed with the lawsuits, he said he was empathetic with the record companies, which is completely different. Considering he has to be inoffensive as possible to both the record industry and the consumer, I think his answer was pretty good, very diplomatic.

Let’s read the whole article, and not just the parts that we decide offend us, okay?

Posted by monkedsel on December 9, 2003 at 9:29 AM (CST)

10

“You are conflating bankruptcy with settlement. If people don’t settle then for some of them the lilihood is that they would be bankrupted, or forced to sell their primary residence.”

Ok, point me to the articles about people being bankrupted by the lawsuits. Or people losing their homes. When has this happened?

If you’re going to argue that people are being bankrupted by the RIAA, you’d better have some sources to back it up.

Posted by Chimpee on December 9, 2003 at 3:17 PM (CST)

11

“Are you seriously telling me you’re in favour of this strategy? How many industries have survived for long after suing their most avid consumers?”

So I guess if I rob a jewelry store and walk out with 250,000 worth of merchandise, I’m one of that store’s most avid consumers??

Where do you work? Maybe I’ll come help myself to a few items.

Posted by Chimpee on December 9, 2003 at 3:22 PM (CST)

12

“So I guess if I rob a jewelry store and walk out with 250,000 worth of merchandise, I’m one of that store’s most avid consumers??”

If you take atoms, then those atoms are gone.

If you copy bits then the original bits remain.

We are no longer living in an Age of Scarcity and the RIAA as a distributor of physical atoms has no place in our world. They remind me of slavers in the South circa 1850 desperately trying to justify their miserable immoral existence, and finally resorting to force, intimidation, and the threat of violence.

Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who record music off the radio?

Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who make mix tapes and distribute them to their friends?

Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who record live bootlegs and distribute them?

Posted by RIAAStoogeChimpee on December 9, 2003 at 3:49 PM (CST)

13

“Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who record music off the radio? “

No, Radio stations pay fees to distribute music to their listeners.  You can legally record it, but note that the quality is degraded and there may be talk-overs.

“Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who make mix tapes and distribute them to their friends?”

Imprisonment may be a bit harsh.  You may not be stealing “Atoms”, but you’re stealing something far more important…time.  Punishment should be imposed, but it’s nearly impossible to enforce.

“Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who record live bootlegs and distribute them?”

No.  This is content that RIAA in many cases cannot offer, thus they are not losing business.  Many bands encourage bootleg trading as a means of distributing their most intimate and thoughtful performaces.

Dan

Posted by RadioiPod on December 9, 2003 at 5:14 PM (CST)

14

“Radio stations pay fees to distribute music to their listeners”

I believe that Napster in its heyday tried to pay license fees, but was shot down. And Kazaa and other p2p networks have similarly argued that Congress regulate the industry to introduce mandatory licensing fees.

To no avail - the RIAA shoots them all down so it can promote timid high-profit biz like iTMS.

In its day broadcast Radio had to fight for its right to distribute music. I see that a few years ago online radio was flourishing with tens of thousands of stations, but then the fees were set at crazy levels to encourage consolidation because the RIAA preferes dealing with a small number of huge conglomerates and aggregators.

And I have seen first-hand RIAA jackboot thugs raiding indie music stores to seize bootleg and mix tapes - along with all their other merchandise. Assisted by Sheriffs, cops, and other pimps.

All Your Music Are Belong To Us, Forever
—RIAA Slogan

Posted by NapsterWeHardlyKnewYe on December 9, 2003 at 5:51 PM (CST)

15

“Does this mean you are in favour of imprisoning people who blah blah blah…”

No, I’m acually in favor of torturing and murdering anyone who happens to believe that people should pay for music.

I’m in favor of kidnapping musician’s pets, skinning them, and wearing the pelts to protest the RIAA’s horrible abuse of power.

I’m in favor of ridiculing people who don’t agree with me by signing my posts with an altered version of their name.

I guess I’m just… like you.

Posted by ChimpeeLovesYou on December 9, 2003 at 8:52 PM (CST)

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