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The U.S. Constitution on your iPod

“Carrying a paper copy of the U.S. Constitution is so 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century. Now you can tote a hyperlinked copy everywhere on your iPod. The free download, dubbed iCon, comes courtesy of the American Constitution Society, a national organization made up of moderate and progressive law students, lawyers, judges, academics, policymakers and advocates.”

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Comments

1

MyRights2Go ??

Posted by kainjow on June 9, 2004 at 1:59 PM (PDT)

2

I’m taking American Heritage here at BYU next semester, and this will be great, no lugging around the textbook, eh?

Posted by seandavid010 in So Cal on June 9, 2004 at 3:52 PM (PDT)

3

>moderate and progressive…

Synonyms for Liberal

Posted by AmIStupid? on June 9, 2004 at 5:13 PM (PDT)

4

who the hell would want that…unless you’re still in high schoool and are trying to cheat on an exam some how…..

Posted by Dmo in Montreal on June 9, 2004 at 5:52 PM (PDT)

5

>Synonyms for Liberal

“We want to counter the dominant vision of American law today, a narrow conservative vision that lacks appropriate regard for the ways in which the law affects people’s lives.”

Yep… seems they are. But I don’t give a rats arse what they believe provided they don’t change the Constitution.

Posted by dede1080 on June 9, 2004 at 6:01 PM (PDT)

6

So, no defense of marriage amendment for you then I take it. 

Posted by JP on June 9, 2004 at 6:11 PM (PDT)

7

Who would want it?  Geez, maybe poli sci majors, or anyone taking a college government course, etc, etc…believe it or not, the constitution is important, even though YOU don’t read it.

Posted by seandavid010 in So Cal on June 9, 2004 at 6:25 PM (PDT)

8

> who the hell would want that..

The Constitution clearly indicates how this country is supposed to work.  If more people would read it, we’d certainly have a better country.

And the first ten amendments to the Constitution put restrictions on the government, detailing rights the gov’t cannot infringe.  The Bill of Rights is NOT a list of rights given to you.  They are a list of rights you already have that the gov’t cannot infringe.  It’s a sublte but *very* important distinction.

It’s quite a brilliant document.  I suggest you read it.

Posted by m.sherman on June 9, 2004 at 6:46 PM (PDT)

9

Look- Lets just leave this as its cool that even more stuff can be put onto an iPod…but lets not get into politics…no good can come of it, especially since people are not exactly going change their opinions based on someone’s opinons without even really talking to them.  So please, lets just drop this.

-Jarell

Posted by Jarell on June 9, 2004 at 6:59 PM (PDT)

10

People carrying around the Constitution? Sounds downright libertarian to me.

Posted by dzd on June 9, 2004 at 6:59 PM (PDT)

11

“It’s quite a brilliant document.”

It’s pretty good, but your political system needs some revision. For example, the US bicameral system is based on a higher house (the Senate) having veto power over legislation. This was popular in the early 19th century but has since diminished. Pretty much all other democracies in the world, when they have an upper house, allow them to amend or delay legislation, not block it entirely.

Lower houses represent the people, upper houses tend to represent the richer classes. This it is that to “buy” an election to Congress costs on average around $1.5m, while buiying a Senate seat costs around $15m. Thus it’s more of a rich person’s game. In British terms, the Senate corresponds to the House of Lords.

It’s worth noting that at the formation of the US republic, many people were against this classist division and proposed a unicameral system. The US chose to follow the British system, even thogh since then Britian has reformed and taken away Prime Minister election abilities from the House of Lords, and complete power is now vested in the COmmons (ie, Congress).

I could go on, but it’s always a good idea to study other democratic system to see what are the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Posted by different democracy on June 9, 2004 at 8:14 PM (PDT)

12

the main point of having the bicameral system was as a compromise between the small colonies and the large colonies, not to follow the british. the senate is not intended to have “veto power” over legislation in the same sense as the president; it is there so that the many (i.e. the many representatives from large states) do not infringe upon the rights of the few. the large colonies wanted proportional representation; the small colonies didn’t; thus we have one chamber of congress proportionally represented and one not.

Posted by democrazy! on June 9, 2004 at 9:13 PM (PDT)

13

Someone should send an iPod with the Constitution on it to baby Bush… he’s obviously never read it. On second thought, someone should read it to him.  wink

Posted by Someone on June 9, 2004 at 11:57 PM (PDT)

14

AmIStupid nailed it (great name, by the way).  Who do these liberals think they are?  The last thing this country needs is a bunch of people familiarizing themselves with the Constitution.

Posted by I, Claudius on June 10, 2004 at 2:44 AM (PDT)

15

Excuse me, would you happen to have any Grey Poupon?

Posted by Stylescraper on June 10, 2004 at 4:26 AM (PDT)

16

Any time in a democracy when everybody’s opinion carries the same weight, you’re in trouble.

Posted by seandavid010 in So Cal on June 10, 2004 at 6:01 AM (PDT)

17

“Any time in a democracy when everybody’s opinion carries the same weight, you’re in trouble.”

Yes. God forbid the common hoi polloi and oiks should havew the vote.

Next thing you know they’ll be letting women and slaves vote as equals!

Posted by yo on June 10, 2004 at 6:27 AM (PDT)

18

“thus we have one chamber of congress proportionally represented and one not.”

Neither chamber in the US uses proportional representation voting. The US system uses single-seat plurality voting where the largest minority (or, rarely, majority) vote winner takes the seat.

And you don’t use single-transferrable (ie, preference/choice) voting for the president.

It’s a very archaic system. You could do with a bit of an update.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proportional_representation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First-past-the-post

Posted by proportional represnetation on June 10, 2004 at 6:30 AM (PDT)

19

I don’t need it I’m not american. Why are you guys so uptight about your politics?

Posted by WOLFMAN on June 10, 2004 at 6:37 AM (PDT)

20

“thus we have one chamber of congress proportionally represented and one not.”

“Neither chamber in the US uses proportional representation voting. The US system uses single-seat plurality voting where the largest minority (or, rarely, majority) vote winner takes the seat. “

I can see, after reading the entirety of which you referenced (thank you), that it was a simple misunderstanding of what the first comment meant.  He simply means that proportional is to the total population of that state, versus 2 senators per state regardless of the size (not by party or within the actual house/congress)

You’re both right - just about different things grin

Posted by stuck@work on June 10, 2004 at 7:50 AM (PDT)

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