Why you can’t hear Jet on an iPod | iLounge News

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Why you can’t hear Jet on an iPod

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By Dennis Lloyd

Publisher, iLounge
Published: Tuesday, November 25, 2003
News Categories: iPod

Unfortunately, iPod’s in Australia are etchnically in breach of copyright if you copy CD’s to them! Plus, iTunes music service is not available in Australia anytime soon.

“Itís a pity Australians cannot legally listen to a Jet song on an iPod, however. Jetís songs are not sold in digital format in Australia, according to the bandís record label, EMI. In Australia, it is illegal to transfer copyrighted music from a CD to an iPod Ė and anyway, Jetís CD, Get Born, is copy-protected. In the US, fans can buy Jet songs Ė along with thousands of other digital tracks Ė for US99c ($1.37) each from Appleís internet music service. But the service is not available in Australia. So what exactly do Aussie iPod owners use their recorders for? Dictation?”

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Comments

21

As far as I understand australian law does not allow backing up of music cds. So legaly the iPod is usless unless you are carrying around 20gig of your own bands work. As for jets album iTunes will rip it with out a problem.

Posted by Ben on November 28, 2003 at 8:46 PM (PDT)

22

Ben,
Itunes for windows (and any other music program) will not copy protected cds. They can be copied if a person holds down shift when the CD is put in (as the copy protection cannot load). As an aussie, the law sucks but you americans have your laws enforced more. Currently ARIA (the Aussie equivilent of the RIAA) has done nothing to stop pirating and [unofficially] has said they arent going to go after copiers (sharers maybe). and plus, with the price of the microphone - why would we use the pod as a dictation tool. even with the exchange rate we would have to be out of our minds (‘cept for the people that would buy anything with the apple logo)

Posted by timmy in Melbourne, Australia on November 29, 2003 at 3:24 AM (PDT)

23

also, this rule does not only apply to iPods. After purchasing a few EMI cd’s - I found not only did they have issues playing in my CD player, but would crash iTunes if I tried to even play them, let alone rip, and they would also give a “no copy” message when I tried to optically dub to minidisc.

I emailed a complaint to EMI about this, and got a rather nasty reply duplicating things that have been mentioned in this thread already, such as there being no law to allow copying for personal use. In response to this, I mentioned that I intended to report them to the ACCC. My reasoning was based on the fact that any ‘disc’ with copy-protection is not in fact, technically, a CD - which is why you will never find the ‘Compact Disc’ logo on any copy-protected release. However, the back cover of Radiohead’s Hail To The Thief clearly has “Compact Disc” written in large type, and other releases have poor indication of the fact they are copy-protected (never mind the awful logo which does not communicate anything - if you never saw it before, what the hell about it would indicate copy protection?). Not only that, but they sell and promote these copy-protected releases as CD’s.

They started bouncing my emails.

Now, I didn’t end up going to the ACCC, mainly, because it was going to end up way to much work for me on what would probably end up being a fruitless task. The bottom line is though, Australian Copyright Law is screwed, and EMI are positively the rudest and customer unfriendly company I have ever dealt with. Their response of “tough” is absolutely unacceptable. CD sales are down, not because of file sharing, but due to record companies absolute contempt for their customers.

Posted by Nathan Adams on November 30, 2003 at 5:03 AM (PDT)

24

“HOWEVER you are BY LAW entitled to backup and DIGITAL encoding bought for PERSONAL USE. This includes music and Software.”

Not true at all. Check http://www.copyright.org.au for the rules and regs (particularly G50 - Computer Software, page 4, paragraph 5).

In the early 90s there was a proposal to make home taping legal + add a small ‘tax’ on blank cassettes to compensate musicians, but this never got up.

Now we have the ludicrous situation of me wanting to use a tune (La Grange) in an iMovie project. I don’t own it, can’t buy it RIGHT NOW (you know how it is…) and would have to pay $20 for a full CD just for one song. So what do I do? I download it…

By putting this into my iMovie and making a DVD out of it for a few people I have broken three laws ( illegal possession of copyrighted material, illegal reproduction, illegal distribution).

Have I deprived ZZ Top of income? Maybe 20 cents. Might my inclusion of this music stimulate sales ... perhaps.

If ARIA and APRA (think RIAA) decided to live in the real world, they’d relax copying rules and allow for LEGAL downloads so I could pay them money and not be branded a sneaky MP3 downloading crim. Then we all win grin

And now, I will slink away….

Posted by martin on December 1, 2003 at 7:28 PM (PDT)

25

All i want to know is the idiots way of getting songs from the Jet CD on to my iPod. I need idiot proof instructions because i suck with computers. Any help would be appreciated

Posted by Jon on October 12, 2004 at 7:38 AM (PDT)

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