Review: RHA MA750 Wireless In-Ear Headphones | iLounge

Review

Review: RHA MA750 Wireless In-Ear Headphones

C+
Average

Company: RHA Audio

Model: MA750 Wireless

Price: $170

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Guido Gabriele

RHA is back with a new version of its MA750 headphones — the MA750 Wireless. Unlike the RHA T20i we tested last year, the MA750 Wireless comes in a "neckbuds" form factor which, against all odds, seems to be increasingly popular these days. Though we think that RHA has just about nailed the neckbud design, we think the MA750 Wireless's sound falls a bit short of the T20i.

Though neckbuds have never been our favorite style of headphone, the MA750 Wireless makes a strong case for its kind. Where the Sennheiser HD1’s luxurious leather-wrapped neckband was a bit stiff and large, the silicone neckband of the MA750 Wireless is light, thin, and extremely flexible. Not only does this make the MA750 Wireless more comfortable than the HD1, it also makes it easier to use with coats and scarves. It’s also far easier to clean than the HD1’s leather; that, along with its IPX4 water resistance rating, making it a better workout companion. Also unlike the HD1, MA750 Wireless’ controls are where they should be, in a familiar three-button control pod just below the right ear; the only button on the neckband is for power and pairing. The cables that extend from the neckband are a perfect length, and route behind the ear with flexible (but not moldable) cable guides. During use, the MA750 Wireless feels weightless. 

Included with the MA750 Wireless are six sets of single-flange silicone tips, two sets of double-flange tips, and a two sets of spherical Comply Foam tips, a breathable carry case, and a USB-A to USB-C charging cable. That’s right — this is the first headphone we’ve reviewed to use USB-C — welcome to the future. The MA750 Wireless’ volume is linked to that of iOS, and all the controls work as expected. Bluetooth aptX (but not aptX-HD) and AAC are supported, and we got about 10–12 hours of battery life on a charge.

The driver housings of the MA750 Wireless are very much in line with what we’ve come to expect from RHA: simple, circular, stainless steel, minimalist, and well-built. RHA calls these “Aerophonic”, claiming that they improve audio reproduction and isolation. The MA750 Wireless does provide adequate isolation, though this might be more attributable to the choice of materials than the shape of the housing. Our only gripe about this design is that the driver housings were a bit large for our ears. This caused the outside of the housings to be pushed backward, such that the ear tips were firing slightly forward into the ear. Though not a problem for comfort, we found that bass response from the MA750 Wireless was better when we pushed them into a more neutral position. Of course, this might just be our ears; your mileage may vary.

The MA750 Wireless uses a single dynamic driver configuration. Unfortunately, it exhibits the all-to-common Bluetooth hiss when audio is “active’, though it’s only really audible when no music is playing. When music is playing, however, the MA750 Wireless has a relatively neutral sound signature. This is usually a good thing, since a neutral headphone will be more genre-agnostic than a headphone with a very colored sound. In the MA750 Wireless, however, this sometimes presents music a bit flat or lifeless. Also, some songs with low-extending bass (like Post Malone’s “Big Lie”) caused the MA750 Wireless to distort. This is not to say that there was anything universally offensive about the MA750 Wireless’ sound — just that we’ve heard better from RHA.

We’re torn on this one. The RHA MA750 Wireless is a very well-designed headphone that includes much about what we like about the RHA brand. Clean lines, quality materials, comfort, and, generous accessories. To our dismay, however, the sound of this particular example didn’t capture our hearts like that of the RHA T20i. Since that’s the most important aspect of any headphone, we have to limit our recommendation.

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Editors' Note: iLounge only reviews products in "final" form, but many companies now change their offerings - sometimes several times - after our reviews have been published. This iLounge article provides more information on this practice, known as revving.

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