iPod, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iOS and iTunes Tips & Tricks | iLounge

Tips & Tricks

Converting Live Photos to Still Images

Sometimes it’s easy to forget to switch off Live Photo mode on your iPhone 6s or iPhone 7, or maybe you have Live Photos that you’d rather just convert back to static, normal images. Fortunately, there are a couple of ways to do this with an existing Live Photo in your Photos app, by either non-destructively editing the original photo, or duplicating a photo in iOS 9.3 or later.

To remove the Live Photo effect from an existing photo, simply go into “Edit” mode and tap the Live Photo icon in the top-left corner of the screen to toggle it off. Like any other edit, this is non-destructive and will not permanently remove the Live Photo effect — it essentially just switches it off while leaving the actual underlying Live Photo data intact. Alternatively, duplicating a Live Photo using the option in the Share Sheet’s Actions menu will provide you with a choice to either duplicate the Live Photo in its original form, or create the copy as a “Still Photo” — in the latter case, the new photo will have all Live Photo data removed entirely, and will simply be stored as a straight JPG image. You can then delete the original Live Photo version entirely if you no longer want to keep it around.

Duplicating a Photo in the iOS Photos app

One of the smaller features that Apple quietly snuck into iOS 9.3 is the ability to create a duplicate of any given photo or set of photos in the iOS Photos app. This can be done by selecting the photo(s) you want to duplicate, bringing up the iOS Share Sheet to see the sharing options, and looking for the “Duplicate” option in the lower actions row.

This creates an exact copy of the image, which can be useful if you want to apply edits while still keeping the original handy. As an added bonus, however, using the “Duplicate” option on a Live Photo will provide a choice between duplicating the Live Photo in its original form, or duplicating it as a still photo.

Adjusting Video Playback Quality to control data usage in iOS 10

If you stream video from the iTunes Store or Apple Music and you’re on a limited data plan, you may appreciate two new quality settings that Apple has added for the built-in Videos app in iOS 10, allowing you to control how much data is used when streaming video, in exchange for quality.

Found in the Videos section of the iOS Settings app, two Playback Quality options allow you to independently choose between “Good” (basically SD quality) or “Best Available” (full HD quality) for both Wi-Fi and Cellular data connections. Users on limited data plans will almost certainly want to stick with the “Good” setting for Cellular, at least, although if you’ve got an older device and aren’t concerned about HD quality, you can get some performance gains from using “Good” for Wi-Fi connections as well.

Choosing preferred Driving + Transit options in iOS 10 Maps

In addition to a whole new design, the Maps app in iOS 10 also adds more control over route options for driving or transit directions. If you scroll down to the bottom of the list of available routes when getting directions in Maps, you’ll see a link for Driving Options or Transit Options, depending on which mode you’re in.

Tapping on Driving Options will bring up switches that allow you to avoid toll roads or highways along your route, while tapping Transit Options allows you to select which types of transit vehicles you would like to include in your route, with options available for Bus, Subway/LRT, Commuter Rail, and Ferry. These options can also be found in the Maps section of the iOS Settings app, under Driving & Navigation and Transit.

Making the Mickey and Minnie Mouse Apple Watch faces speak the time

Along with the new Minnie Mouse Watch Face in watchOS 3, Apple has also snuck in the ability to have both Mickey and Minnie actually announce the time when you tap on them.

The feature is normally enabled by default for both of these Mickey and Minnie Watch Faces, but if you’re having trouble, swipe up to access Control Center and make sure your watch isn’t set to silent mode, and go into the watchOS Settings app, choose Sound & Haptics, and scroll down to ensure that Tap to Speak Time is enabled. If it’s the first time you’ve used the feature, you may also need to ensure that you’re connected to Wi-Fi (via your paired iPhone) and wait a few minutes for the necessary voice data to be downloaded over the Internet.

Accessing Medical ID from the iOS 10 Lock Screen

A useful feature in the iOS Health app that you may not be aware of is the ability to store your “Medical ID” for emergency purposes, including emergency contact information, medical conditions, allergies, medications, blood type, and more. This is all setup from the “Medical ID” tab in the Health app, and is designed to be accessed from the iPhone lock screen or Apple Watch in the event of an emergency. The Medical ID can be accessed from an iPhone Lock Screen by bringing up the passcode entry screen, tapping the “Emergency” button at the top, and then tapping the “Medical ID” icon that appears in the bottom left corner. Calls can even be placed to emergency contacts right from this screen with a single tap. If you don’t want your Medical ID available from the lock screen, you can just turn off the “Show When Locked” setting at the top of the Medical ID editing screen.

Enabling animations in iOS 10 Messages

The new iMessage animations in iOS 10 are a lot of fun, but if you find that they’re not actually working, you’ll want to check your iOS Accessibility settings. After iOS 7 debuted its “parallax effect,” many iPhone users found it distracting or nauseating and decided to disable it by turning on Reduce Motion under Accessibility settings.

If you had this setting enabled before, it stays enabled after you update to iOS 10 — and as part of reducing motion, it also logically turns off any motion-related effects in the iOS 10 Messages app, such as animated bubbles and background animations. With Reduce Motion enabled, in fact, you not only won’t be able to receive or see these effects, but you can’t send iMessages using the effects either — pressing and holding on the Send button will have no effect at all, and Apple doesn’t make it particularly obvious that these features are dependent on the Reduce Motion setting.

Taking pictures and saving to photo library in iOS 10 Messages

Apple’s done some cool new things with the Messages app in iOS 10, including adding a live preview for taking photos right within a conversation. If you’ve used this feature, however, you may have noticed that the photo you capture doesn’t actually save to the iPhone’s Photo Library — it’s only inserted into the current conversation. While this can be desirable in some cases, if you’re taking a photo that you might want to keep around for later, you can actually bring up the full iPhone Camera by swiping from left to right and tapping on the Camera button that will appear.

This also has the advantage of giving you a full-screen camera view, which users of smaller-screened iPhones will certainly appreciate, compared to the much smaller live preview window.

Saving power with Face-down detection for iPhone

If you get a lot of notifications during the day, you can actually save a bit of battery life by leaving your iPhone face down on a table or other surface. Face-down detection is a subtle feature that Apple snuck into iOS 9 last fall to save a bit of power on modern iPhones by not lighting up the screen whenever text message notifications come in — after all, the screen is one of the biggest power consumers on the iPhone, and since you can’t see the screen anyway when the iPhone is face down, what’s the point in turning it on?

Finding Frequently Visited Locations on your iPhone

You may not be aware, but by default your iPhone actually keeps track of places you’ve frequently visited and when you were there. While this is done primarily to aid in features like navigation in the iOS Maps app and for iOS 9’s “Proactive Assistant” to help figure out when you’re most likely going to work or the grocery store, you can also see the data for yourself. While the set of places isn’t comprehensive — it’s based on frequently visited locations, rather than a list of everywhere that you’ve been even once — it can still be handy if you’re trying to figure out when you were last out at a specific location.

You’ll need to dig deep into the iOS Settings app to find it — specifically going into Privacy, Location Services and then scrolling down all the way to the bottom to find System Services, where Frequent Locations will appear among other iOS features that use the location monitoring services.

Speeding up Apple Pay at checkout

Apple Pay is a pretty useful feature, especially when you keep your phone handier than your wallet, and you use it in tandem with other Wallet features such as scannable loyalty cards. That said, the NFC payments process is not always flawless, especially when you have to fumble with your iPhone to hit the Touch ID sensor while also lining it up properly with the contactless terminal. Fortunately, there are a couple of useful tricks to help speed up the process.

Choosing Sidebar Categories in iTunes 12.4

Now that iTunes 12.4 has brought the sidebar back, you can not only more easily navigate between different groupings of your media content, but you can also choose which categories you want to see. Hovering over the “Library” heading at the top of the sidebar will reveal an “Edit” button; click this and you’ll see all available categories — even some you may not have realized were there.

Placing a checkmark beside a category makes it appear in the sidebar, while removing the checkmark hides it. When you’re done customizing your sidebar list, simply click “Done” to return to the normal sidebar view.

Adjusting Artwork Size in iTunes 12.4

iTunes 12.4, released earlier this week, has taken steps to simplify the user interface a bit. Although most of the same options are still there, they’ve been moved around and a few have been enhanced a bit in the process. View options have been taken out of the location on the top-right drop-down menu and have returned entirely to the traditional View overlay dialog found in pre-iTunes 12 versions — accessible using the Show View Options or by simply pressing CMD+J.

Quickly unlocking your iPhone for Siri

For security reasons, when you make certain requests of Siri — such as checking your email or unlocking a HomeKit door lock — she’ll respond that you need to unlock your iPhone first, usually presenting you with the keypad, so you can either punch in your passcode or use Touch ID to authenticate. However, if you often find yourself making these requests, you’ll be happy to know that there’s a way to do it a bit quicker, as long as you’re using a Touch ID-equipped iPhone.

Accessing Apple Watch Glances with Siri

If you’ve got an Apple Watch on your wrist, you’re probably already familiar with Glances — those useful summaries of information from built-in and third-party apps. What you may not realize, however, is that you can call up specific glances by name with Siri — even glances that aren’t included in your list of active glances.

Using the iPhone as a remote camera with Apple Watch

If you’ve got an Apple Watch, you probably already know that you can use your wearable device as a camera remote to take pictures on your iPhone from your wrist, but you may not realize that it also makes a great way to keep an eye on what’s happening elsewhere in your home or nearby, directly from your wrist.

For example, you could leave your iPhone in a kid’s room to keep an eye on the youngsters while you’re busy with other household tasks, or check on the status of lights in the kitchen when trying to figure out which circuit breakers are which in the basement of your house. As the link between the iPhone and your Apple Watch is limited to the standard Bluetooth range of about 30 feet, you won’t be able to roam far, but it should work reasonably well in a small home or office setting.

Using photos for an Apple Watch Face

Apple provides some pretty nice built-in Faces for the Apple Watch, but if you’re really looking to give the Apple Watch your own personal sense of style, you’ll be happy to know that watchOS 2 lets you select one of your own photos to use as an Apple Watch Face. You can choose to either use a single photo (including Live Photos if you’ve got an iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, or iPhone SE), or choose to cycle through your entire synced photo album.

Using ‘Nearby’ on Apple Watch

While Apple’s watchOS 2.2 update wasn’t nearly as feature-packed as iOS 9.3 or even tvOS 9.2, it did offer up at least one particularly useful new feature: The “Nearby” feature from iOS 9’s Apple Maps comes not only to CarPlay, but also to the Apple Watch, once you’re running watchOS 2.2.

Using your iPhone’s flash LED for alerts and notifications

If you work or live in a noisy environment, have a hard time hearing your iPhone alerts, or simply want to take advantage of a cool iPhone case feature, you’ll likely appreciate the ability to have your iPhone light up its camera flash LED to let you know about incoming notifications. This feature is built into the iPhone, although it’s not located in an obvious place, as Apple designed it specifically for those users with hearing problems who may not be able to hear their iPhone ringing, even at the loudest volume. As a result, the setting lives not under Sounds or Notifications, where you might expect it to be, but in the Accessibility section, under Settings, General.

Syncing iTunes Store videos with older iPods

Although many users are likely focused mostly on HD videos these days, Apple has still been taking steps recently to increase the quality of the SD video content in the iTunes Store, pushing the envelope beyond what older traditional iPods can handle. If you’re still using an iPod classic or iPod nano for storing and watching videos, you may start running into an error message that “high-quality SD video is not compatible with this iPod” when you try to sync or transfer your videos.

Recent News

Recent Reviews

Recent Articles

Sign up for the iLounge Weekly Newsletter


iLounge is an independent resource for all things iPod, iPhone, iPad, and beyond.
iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, Apple TV, Mac, and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc.
iLounge is © 2001 - 2016 iLounge, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy