iPod, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iOS and iTunes Tips & Tricks | iLounge

Turning on the Emoji keyboard in iOS 5

The iPhone’s lack of Emoji characters used to be a sore spot for some, with complex workarounds required to enable access on Western devices. Now, with iOS 5, accessing your iOS device’s built-in Emoji keyboard is a simple as can be. To do so, open the Settings app, tap on General, tap on Keyboard, and tap on International Keyboards. On the next screen, tap on Add New Keyboard and select Emoji from the list. Once that’s done, you’ll be able to access the full library of Emoji icons from the standard keyboard by tapping the globe icon.

Working around a dead Home button

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The build quality of Apple’s iOS devices is generally commendable, but we’ve encountered more than a few users who’ve had their Home button stop working, in some cases long before they were due for a cheap upgrade on their subsidized device. With the new Accessibility features in iOS 5 came an on-screen workaround for this problem, less than optimal though it may be.

To enable the workaround, open the Settings app, tap on General, tap on Accessibility, scroll down, and tap on AssistiveTouch. Turning this feature on will bring up a small button with concentric circles that when tapped will bring up an on-screen menu offering the software equivalent of the home button, as well as options for quickly accessing Device controls like volume, mute, screen lock, and rotation, Gesture controls, and saved Favorite gestures.

The button is located in the lower right hand corner by default, but can be dragged around the screen’s edge to any position you choose. Like we said, it’s sub-optimal, but if you’re dealing with a wonky Home button, it sure beats dealing with the frustration of not having your device work consistently. [via AppHipMom]

Quickly access last saved Mail draft on iOS

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Should you be composing an email and need to reference a different email to complete your correspondence, the process for getting back to your draft—after you hit Save Draft, of course—is inconvenient at best. Unless, of course, you use this handy tip. Once you’re ready to return to your draft, simply tap and hold the Compose button, and Mail will automatically bring up your most recent saved draft, so you can continue writing without needing to dig through multiple folders. [via Obama Pacman]

Reopening closed tabs in Safari on the iPad

  • February 21, 2012
  • iPad

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While the arrival of tabbed browsing on the iPad was a boon to any user prone to opening more than one site at once, it brought with it the potential for accidentally closed tabs. Luckily, Apple built-in an easy way to reopen those tabs without needing to dig through the browser history. To reopen a tab, simply tap and hold on the new tab button, and a menu will appear listing your recently closed tabs, meaning that slideshow you accidentally nixed is little more than a tap or two away.

Using the iPad keyboard’s ‘hidden’ keys

  • February 16, 2012
  • iPad

iOS 5 brought with it a number of new features and improvements for iPad users, and one of the more curious among them was the ability to split the device’s software keyboard in two, allowing users to use both thumbs to type, as they do on iPhones or iPod touches. But did you know that this special keyboard also features unseen, hidden keys that can help you out if you’re used to hitting certain keys with certain thumbs? Indeed, tapping to the immediate right of the T, G, or V keys produces a Y, H, or B, respectively, and tapping to the immediate left of the Y, H, or B keys on the other side produces its corresponding letter from the other side of the gap. It’s not life-altering, but if you’re used to typing your mobile Gs with your right thumb, it’s pretty darn handy. [via Finer Things | CoM]

Hiding app purchases in iTunes in the Cloud

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The ability to re-download apps you’ve bought in the past is great, but if you’re anything like us, you’ve downloaded plenty of apps that you don’t actually use. Luckily, Apple has built in a super-simple way to hide those purchases, so they aren’t cluttering up your Purchased list. To do this from an iOS device, simply find an app you’d lie to hide and swipe across it, and you’ll see the iCloud download button replaced with a red Hide button, which you can tap to hide the app. To unhide purchases, visit the account management pane of the App Store, and tap on Hidden Purchases. You can also achieve this trick from iTunes on the PC or Mac by visiting your Purchased apps and hovering over the icon of any app you’d like to hide until a small x button appears in the corner; you can likewise unhide purchases by visiting your account settings page.

Adding formatting to emails in iOS 5

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Ever wish you could have even a few formatting options when typing up emails on the iOS device? Well, assuming you’re running iOS 5, you actually do. To access them, simply highlight the word or words you’d like to format, and when the cut/copy/paste menu appears, tap the right most arrow, then the B I U button, then choose from the bold, italics, or underline options that appear. Oh, and try not to gloat when the recipient asks how you did it.

Setting iMessage up across multiple devices

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In theory, Apple’s iMessage service sounds wonderful—the ability to send and receive texts to/from people from your iPad or iPod touch as well as your iPhone is great. But you have to set it up a certain way to make that happen. By default, iMessage on the iPhone defaults to using the device’s phone number—but as long as friends and family continue messaging that number, those messages will never go to your other devices. In order to make that happen, you need to make sure your Apple ID is also set up for iMessage on all your devices, then tell folks to message you using the ID, and not your phone number—new messages should then start arriving on all your devices, letting you respond from whichever is the most convenient. Oh, and one important note: if you use your phone number for iMessage, Apple does some sort of device ID/SIM authentication that could leave that handset receiving your messages long after you’ve upgraded, even if you’ve wiped and restored it.

Finding iTunes U content on an iOS device

If you’ve been used to finding your iTunes U content in its normal home inside the iTunes Store or Videos apps, the recent release of Apple’s dedicated iTunes U app may have thrown you for a loop. But fear not—all the content is still available. Just not where you remember it. To access iTunes U content today, you need to download and/or launch Apple’s official iTunes U app. A simple Catalog button on the Library screen will take you to the same iTunes U content you’ve accessed before, only now it will live inside the iTunes U app—on that aforementioned Library screen—instead of in your Videos app.

Making Address Book sync properly to iCloud

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Use a Mac? Had problems with new contacts created in Address Book syncing over to your iOS devices? Thanks to an obscure setting in Address Book, iCloud doesn’t always work as it should, but fixing it is typically pretty simple. First, open System Preferences, and open the iCloud tab, then double-check that Contacts sync is turned on. Once that’s done, fire up Address Book, and open Preferences. Down at the bottom of the General tab, you’ll see an option for Default Account - click this, and switch it from On My Mac to iCloud. Once that’s done, all new contacts created should automatically appear on all your iOS devices.

Using an iOS device as an Apple TV remote camera

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When Apple added AirPlay video mirroring to the Apple TV with the launch of the iPad 2, it opened up a world of new possibilities for developers and users alike—including one possibility that, while somewhat silly, might someday come in handy someday. If you own both an Apple TV and an iPad 2 or iPhone 4S, you can use one of the latter devices as a remote camera, which you can view from the Apple TV. Simply double-tap the Home button, swipe over to the media controls hidden in the multitasking tray, tap the AirPlay button, select the Apple TV you wish to use, and turn on Mirroring. Once that’s done, all you need to do is open a camera app on the portable device, and whatever it’s looking at should appear on the screen. This is great for static surveillance jobs, but what if your subject—say, a child—is on the move? Simply strap one of the devices to a remote-controlled vehicle and you’ll be able to keep an eye on the entire house—or at least that floor. [via TUAW]

Accessing Undo and Redo from the iPad keyboard

  • January 19, 2012
  • iPad

Accessing the undo command on the iPhone and iPod touch is as easy as shaking the device… but the iPad is decidedly less-easy to move easily, and as such, shake-to-undo features are even less common on the iPad than they are on its smaller siblings. Luckily, Apple baked an undo feature right into the iPad’s keyboard, saving you from looking like a crazy person who violently shakes their gadgets in public. To access it, simply bring up the keyboard, and hit the “.?123” key. Nearby, you’ll spot a key that’s helpfully labeled “undo”, which works more-or-less system-wide to undo your last keyboard action—and if you need to redo something, follow the same steps and you’ll see the same button labeled accordingly.

Hiding Newsstand on the iPhone or iPod touch

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iOS 5’s Newsstand feature can be great for those who read a lot of publications on their devices, but the trouble is that most of those publications tend to be iPad-focused if not iPad-only, leaving most Newsstands on the iPhone and iPod touch bereft of icons, like a shelf in an empty store. And unfortunately, there is no “official” way to hide or turn off the icon, and since it’s just a glorified folder, you can’t put a folder inside another folder. Or can you?

With a bit of speed, it’s possible. To start, make sure your Newsstand icon is nearby, then press, hold, and drag an app on top of another app to create a new folder, then immediately grab the Newsstand icon and drag it into the folder. If you’re fast enough, your Newsstand icon will be neatly tucked away inside a folder, freeing up valuable screen real estate. Just remember that if you want to actually use the Newsstand, you’ll need to drag it back out of the folder and on to the main screen—trying to use it from within the folder will cause your device to restart. [via GigaOM]

Top Tips of 2011

Continuing our end-of-year roundup, we’ve decided to use today’s Tip to give you a list of links to our top tips of the past year. Below, you’ll find links to tips for iTunes, iPhone, iPad, iPod, and Apple TV users, with a little something for both new users and experienced pros.

Sharing Multiple Photos on iOS
Taking control of your iTunes Library with Smart Playlists
Getting the most out of iOS’ software keyboard
Setting up Automatic Downloads in iOS and iTunes
Getting rid of Wi-Fi network pop-ups on iOS
Navigating the Music app with one hand
Mastering the Apple TV remote
Setting up an iTunes Store Allowance account
Setting up Notification Center on iOS 5
Making Siri work with Facebook + Twitter
Sharing an iCloud account for multi-device access
Customizing your Mail signature on iOS

Enabling text-to-speech on iOS devices

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Apple’s Mac computers have long offered users a built-in speech engine that can read on-screen text aloud—but did you know that your iOS device can do the same thing? To activate the feature, open the Settings app, tap on Accessibility, tap on Speak Selection, and turn on Speak Selection. Once you’ve got that set up, simply select any text, and you’ll see a new “Speak” option sitting next to the standard copy option. Tap it, and you’ll hear your device begin to read the text back to you. While it’s definitely a handy feature, you’ll want to play around with the speaking rate until you find a pace that’s right for you—we found the default setting to be a bit too speedy.

How to give an app as a gift

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Searching around for some last-minute holiday gifts? If you’ve got any iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch users left on your list, an app might be just the gift they’re looking for. To gift an app, simply open the App Store on your desktop computer or own iDevice, and find the app you’d like to send out. On the desktop, click on the downward-facing arrow next to the app price, and choose “Gift This App”, or if you’re on an iOS device, simply scroll to the bottom of the individual app’s page—if necessary—and tap on “Gift This App”. You’ll be taken to a page where you can enter the recipient’s email, a personal message, and choose whether to have the gifted app delivered by email or—if you’re on a desktop—via a physical page that you can print out and hand to the recipient yourself.  Just make sure you don’t send the app to new owners until after they’ve opened their iOS device.

Customizing your Mail signature on iOS

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Sure, it was cool at one time, but these days iPhones—and iPads and iPod touches, for that matter—are so common that the “Sent from my iPhone” signature on your email has ceased to be special. If you’re not leaving it there for the purpose of explaining away a potentially terse and/or typo-ridden reply, why not make it a little more personal, or just remove it altogether? Doing so is easy. Open the Settings app, tap on Mail, Contacts, Calendars, scroll down, and tap on Signature. Your current “Sent from my…” message will appear in a text field that will let you easily edit it to whatever you want. Once you’re pleased with the result, tap the back button, and you’ll never send those unnecessary characters again. [via Cult of Mac]

Sharing iCloud calendars without sharing alarms

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So you’d like to share a calendar with a family member or spouse, but that person doesn’t want to deal with the alarms you set for yourself. Signing into your account on the other person’s device sounds like an ideal solution, but unfortunately, you can’t turn off the alarms on an iOS device, so unless that other person doesn’t mind hearing an audible alert every time you’ve got a meeting, it’s not a workable solution.

There is a workaround, though. If you set the calendar in question to be shared publicly by visiting iCloud.com and hitting the small “broadcast” button next to the calendar, you’ll be given a highly obscure URL that the other person can use to subscribe in iCal, choosing “Remove Alarms” when they add it. If the other person isn’t a Mac user, they can subscribe to the URL directly from their iOS device by entering the URL in Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Add Accounts > Other > Add Subscribed Calendar, and choosing the “Remove Alarms” option. Once that’s done, they’ll have access to your complete calendar, but without the potential annoyance of unnecessary alarms.

Clearing out your iCloud Photo Stream

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So iCloud and iOS 5’s new Photo Stream feature is, conceptually, a great one: any photo you shoot—provided you’re on Wi-Fi—can instantly be accessed across all of your devices, and even used as a screensaver for your Apple TV. But what if you shot something you didn’t want to have plastered all over your TV, only to realize that there’s no simply way to remove a single photo? Well, you either have to live with it until it gets pushed out by 1,000 other photos, or reset your entire stream. Today we’ll show you how to handle the second option.

First, make sure you have an original backup of the photos in your Photo Stream, preferably in Apple’s iPhoto or Aperture photo management programs. Then, visit iCloud.com, sign in, and click on your name in the upper right-hand corner of the screen. On the pop-up that appears, click on Reset Photo Stream. One you’ve given confirmation, go around to your devices and turn Photo Stream off and back on to flush the previous contents. Sure, you’ll then be left with an empty Photo Stream, but you can easily refill it using those originals in iPhoto and Aperture, and even if you don’t, it’s still better than leaving potentially embarrassing photos on semi-permanent rotation in your living room. For more information on iCloud, see our Instant Expert article.

Deleting your on-device iOS music library with one swipe

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Sure, it would have been crazy just five years ago, but in these modern times of iTunes Match, iTunes in the Cloud, eight-megapixel photos, and HD video, the idea of needing to quickly—and temporarily—free up space on your iOS device isn’t as absurd as it might sound. Apparently, Apple’s developers thought this way too, and included a super-simple way to do so. First, open the Settings app, then General, Usage, and Music, in that order. At the top, you’ll see a listing called “All Music”—simply swipe to the right across this listing, and a Delete button will appear, giving you back however many MB—or GB—you might have tied up in audio. And if you’re ready to get some of it back and don’t have access to your home computer, follow this easy tip to re-download past purchases straight from iTunes.

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