iPod, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iOS and iTunes Tips & Tricks | iLounge

Tips & Tricks

Making iOS forget Bluetooth devices

Bluetooth can be super handy for short-range wireless communication, but with so many devices supporting it, you might sometimes find yourself in situations where the list of Bluetooth devices appearing in your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch’s list becomes unmanageable. Thankfully, Apple built in a way to get rid of listings for devices you don’t use. Simply fire up Settings, tap on Bluetooth, and tap on the blue circle next to the device you’d rather not see again. On the next page, tap on Forget this Device, and you won’t see it again. If you decide at some point in the future that you want to use a forgotten device again, just set it to pairing mode and it will reappear in your list. [via CoM]

Hiding text message previews on iOS

Sure, getting a preview of your incoming text messages without needing to unlock your device is handy—but there are some times when you might not want everyone in eyeshot of your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch to see what you’re discussing with the person on the other end. Luckily, iOS offers a super-easy way to stop this. Open the Settings app, tap on Notifications, and tap on Messages. Scroll down the screen a bit, and you’ll see an toggle for Show Preview. Set this to off, and you won’t see anything more than an alert telling you who your new message is from. [via CoM]

Manually adding images to Photo Stream

Apple’s Photo Stream service does a good job of automatically syncing your latest photos across all your Macs and iOS devices—but what happens when you need ubiquitous access to an older photo? Well, you can manually sync your device and transfer it over, or you can just use Photo Stream to your advantage to send it back out to your devices. To do so, just drag and drop any image or collection of images you want from iPhoto or Aperture on your Mac into your Photo Stream, and viola—all of those photos will now appear in your Photo Stream on your iOS devices, for the next 30 days, at which point they’ll “expire” to make room for new memories.

Showing/Hiding the Battery Percentage on iOS

Starting with the iPhone 3GS, Apple’s iOS devices have been able to provide users with a (relatively) precise measurement of their battery’s remaining charge. Some people like it, some don’t, but no matter which way you lean there’s an easy way to toggle it on and off. Open the Settings app, tap on General, tap on Usage, and find the switch named Battery Percentage. Set it to your preferred state and you’ll never have to worry about it (not) cluttering up your status bar again.

Rotating images from within the Photos app

While the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad generally do a good job of rotating images to their proper orientation, every once in a while an odd grip or shot will confound it, leaving you with some work to do before it’s ready to share or archive. Luckily, there’s an easy—and built-in—way to fix this. Simply select the photo you need to fix, tap the Edit button, and tap the rotate button—it’s the one that looks like an arrow pointing backwards. Do this as many times as necessary to get the look you want, then tap Save. iOS will automatically replace the original image with the new version, and you’ll be ready to use it however you please—and should you need to undo your changes, it’ll have the original waiting for you.

Saving an image in Safari on iOS

Run across an image you’d like to add to your collection while browsing on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch? There’s a dead-simple way to save any image you find online to your Camera Roll. Simply tap and hold on the image, and choose Save Image from the menu that pops up. Just don’t go posting it on Instagram—after all, no one likes a cheater.

Enabling Caps Lock on iOS

While it’s not nice to shout, there are times when the Caps Lock feature of standard keyboards can come in handy—when typing out a list of acronyms, for example. Luckily, Apple made it easy to access this same feature from your iOS virtual keyboard. First, open up the Settings app, tap on General, tap on Keyboard, and make sure that Enable Caps Lock is set to on. Once that’s done, all you need to do is double-tap the shift button—it will turn blue to let you know it’s enabled, and a single tap is all that’s required to shut it off. SEE? SO MUCH BETTER.

Sharing Reminders over iCloud

Have someone you need to share a list of Reminders with? You might not know it from looking at the app, but there’s an easy way to do so. Simply fire up your browser, visit iCloud.com, log in, and open up the Calendar app. Over to the left, you’ll see a list of your Reminder lists. Just choose which one you’d like to share—a grocery list, for example—and then click the broadcast button (the one on the right). A box will popup allowing you to invite iCloud members to the list, and giving you full control over whether they can simply see the list or edit it, as well.

Removing the Dictation key from iPhone 4S

Despite the company’s efforts to promote it, not everyone likes Siri—and some folks like the Dictation key that comes with her even less, as it shrinks the iPhone’s space bar. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get rid of it—you just have to disable Siri in the process. To do so, open the Settings app, tap on General, and tap on Siri, then turn the slider to off. Once this is done, you’ll have your pre-4S keyboard back, larger space bar and all.

Forcing an iOS device to Update or Restore

Typically, getting an iOS device to update is as easy as plugging it into your computer and hitting the Update button in iTunes—or even easier if you have an iOS 5 device, as you can handle the update directly from the Settings app. But what if you need to downgrade your OS, or install an Update image that iTunes can’t retrieve from the server—such as the just released iOS 6 beta? Doing so is easy. Simply connect your device to your PC or Mac, make sure you have the latest version of iTunes installed and the necessary update image downloaded, click on your device in the iTunes sidebar, and when the main tab appears, hold the option (on Mac) or shift (on Windows) key in and hit the Update or Restore button, then choose the location of the update image. Click done, and iTunes will begin its normal process of updating or restoring the device’s software, no separate download required.

Enabling Closed Captioning on iOS and iTunes

Most folks are familiar with Closed Captioning (CC)—the system for displaying text during a TV or video to help those with hearing disabilities follow along. But the system isn’t useful solely to them—if you’d like to watch a movie or TV show silently, for instance. Luckily, there’s lots of CC-enabled content available from the iTunes Store, and enabling the service on Apple’s devices is fairly simple. In iTunes on a Mac or PC, open up the Preferences, select Playback, and turn on the “Show closed captioning when available” option. On an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch, open the Settings app, tap on Video, and turn Closed Captioning on. Last but not least, you can access the same option on the Apple TV by visiting the Settings menu, selecting Audio & Video, and then turning Closed Captioning on. Now you can enjoy your content—and some peace and quiet. [via OS X Daily]

Using Siri without the Home button

Watch any of Apple’s recent iPhone 4S commercials and you’ll no doubt see a celebrity tapping and holding their phone’s Home button in to activate the (miraculously accurate) virtual assistant. But did you know that you can use Siri without hitting the Home button at all? Simply open up the Settings app, tap on General, tap on Siri, and turn Raise to Speak on. Now when you need help pulling together your gazpacho or answering ridiculously obvious questions about the weather, all you need to do is grab your phone and hold it to your face.

Disabling iOS’ built-in YouTube app

Apple has generally done a great job of keeping its built-in iOS apps up to date—with the YouTube app a glaring exception to this rule. Barely updated since its debut on the original iPhone in 2007, it has long since been surpassed by the video sharing giant’s own mobile website—yet iOS is still set to open all YouTube videos in the native app. Luckily, there’s an easy way to get around this limitation. Simply fire up Settings, tap on General, tap on Restrictions, enable Restrictions if you haven’t already, and disallow YouTube. Doing so has the dual benefit of redirecting all YouTube links to the mobile website and hiding the native app on the device, clearing up more space for apps you actually want to use. [via Lifehacker]

Introducing Siri to your family

Siri is certainly smart, but she’s not a mind reader—if you want to be able to tell her to call your mom, you have to tell Siri who she is first. Doing so is amazingly simple. Just call up Siri, and when you hear the familiar prompt, say “Jane Doe is my mother” or “John Doe is my father”—note that you should use your actual family member’s names, unless your name happens to be James Doe—and soon enough Siri will know your spouse, parents, siblings, and other relations—possibly better than you do.

Searching the current page in Safari

Most of the time, it’s easy to find what you’re looking for on a webpage from an iOS device—especially if you’re on a mobile-friendly site. For those times when it’s not so easy, like when you’re searching for a particular passage in a long-form article, Safari offers an easy to do so. Simply tap in the built-in search area and type in what you’re looking for. Below the recommended search suggestions you see an area marked “On This Page”, with the number of times a certain term is used. Tap on it, and you’ll be given a pair of arrows that will let you hop between each appearance of the term; once you’re finished, simply tap the Done button to start reading.

Getting a word definition in iOS

Most users of iBooks are familiar with the Define option that appears whenever you select a word — but did you know this trick works all over iOS? In any app that has selectable text, simply highlight the word you’d like defined and tap the Define button. On the iPhone or iPod touch, a definition pane will slide up from the bottom of the screen, while on the iPad, the definition will popup to the side of the word.

Purchasing alert tones on your iOS device

Tired of the built-in alert tones on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad? It’s easy to acquire new ones via the built-in iTunes Tone Store. Simply fire up Settings, and click on Sounds (if you’re on an iPhone or iPod touch) or General, then Sounds (if you’re on an iPad), then select any of the Alert options you’d like to change, such as Ringtone, Text Tone, or New Mail. Scroll up to the top of the screen, and you’ll see an option to Buy More Tones, which will launch the iTunes Store and take you to the Tones section.

Alternatively, you can launch the iTunes Store first, then tap the More button, and select Tones (on the iPhone and iPod touch) or tap the Genres button in the upper left-hand corner of the iPad app, and select Tones. At $0.99 a pop, they aren’t cheap, but there’s a ton to choose from, and it sure beats being the 20th person in the restaurant to check your phone when someone’s device starts blaring Marimba.

Quickly scrolling to the top of the screen in iOS

iOS is known for its smooth scrolling, but sometimes all that swiping can be an annoyance when all you really want to is get back to the top of the screen—to access the address bar in Safari, for instance. It appears that Apple planned for this, as iOS has had a simple shortcut built-in since the days of the first iPhone that does precisely that. In nearly any app, you can tap the status bar—where the time lives—to instantly jump back to the top of a list or page, letting you get get where you need to go—no more wasted swipes.

Setting the default Mail address on iOS 5

Find yourself frequently changing the From address when composing a new email in Mail? Perhaps it’s time to change your default Mail address. To do so, open the Settings app, tap on Mail, Contacts, Calendars, scroll down, and tap on Default Account. From the screen that appears, you can select your most oft-used account from every account on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, shaving one step off your new email routine.

Deleting apps based on storage requirements

With iOS devices becoming ever more capable of creating and downloading content and apps, managing your device’s storage has become increasingly important. If you find yourself running out of room on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, there’s a simple way to see what apps are using the most storage. Open the Settings app, tap on General, then tap on Usage. At the top of the screen under the Storage header, you’ll see a list of your installed apps, sorted by the amount of storage used, with an option to show all apps at the bottom. Using this list, you can discover which apps are the most storage hungry, and simply tap on any app to see more details, along with a button to delete the app, letting you delete only those apps that are adversely affecting your storage and leave the rest on your device.

Recent News

Recent Reviews

Recent Articles

Sign up for the iLounge Weekly Newsletter

Email:

iLounge is an independent resource for all things iPod, iPhone, iPad, and beyond.
iPod, iPhone, iPad, iTunes, Apple TV, Mac, and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc.
iLounge is © 2001 - 2014 iLounge, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy