First iPhone unpacking photos, manuals, hands-on posted (updated)

You’ve seen the photos of iPhone: here are the photos of iPhone’s box and box contents. Just like Apple’s old premium iPods—the way they used to be packaged before price drops and smaller packages prevailed—the iPhone comes with premium items such as a charging, audio, and synchronization Dock, as well as a USB Power Adapter. It also includes current iPod-like fare, specifically a Stereo Headset (earphones with microphone), a Dock Connector to USB Cable, and printed documentation. New to the package is a cleaning cloth, provided to help keep the screen shining. iTunes 7.3 remains a download from the Apple.com web site, rather than a CD in the box.

You can see iLounge’s first iPhone unpacking photos here. Additional photos are available from the link below.

 

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You can see additional iPhone unpacking photos here.

Update: Apple has posted manuals for the iPhone to its web site. With the Mac OS X application Preview, you’ll see TOC and Index links.

Hands-On: iLounge’s editor Larry Angell notes from his retail iPhone the setup process to transfer an existing line to iPhone was extremely fast, and called in a report to us from the road. He notes, however, that AT&T network speeds, which were reportedly upgraded for iPhone, do not appear to be very fast in his initial tests of the EDGE network. His second call on iPhone was dropped one minute in, and his third call also disconnected after several minutes. AT&T’s network appears to be taking a hit with the addition of the many new iPhone users.

Larry adds that, despite other data questions he still has, Google Maps is running very fast on his iPhone. It’s also pulling up correct, nearby locations with a surprising degree of accuracy as to his present location. Perhaps from his launch day excitement, he’s finding that the screen is smudging from his face, but it’s not visible head-on—the screen is still perfectly clear. It’s only visible on odd angles. He also feels that the iPhone is much slimmer than most of the photos give it credit for being. In brief web testing, he notes that MP3 and certain movie files found on web pages will play back on iPhone, but YouTube videos found embedded on a page (such as iLounge) will not, so you’ll need to use the YouTube browser. We’ll add more impressions shortly.