iOS 4.1 HDR, YouTube HD upload screenshots posted

Updated

Apple’s release of the final version of iOS 4.1 to end users is days away, but we’ve just received screenshots showing off two of the new and previously unannounced features: high dynamic range (HDR) photography and high-definition uploading to YouTube.

iOS 4.1 HDR, YouTube HD upload screenshots posted

Our source indicates that the HDR camera functionality, activated by a new button on the top of the camera screen, has interesting characteristics and limitations that may be of interest to some users. First, when HDR is turned on, it now takes 3-5 seconds longer to save an HDR image on an iPhone 4, as the device gathers multiple images and uses them to create the more colorful final photograph. Second, HDR cannot be used with the flash—turning HDR on automatically turns the flash off, with the flash returning to its prior setting if HDR is turned off. Third, there’s a setting that will either keep the “normally exposed photo” or discard it when HDR is turned on. If you’re viewing this article from our main page, more screenshots can be seen by clicking on the article’s title.

 

iOS 4.1 HDR, YouTube HD upload screenshots posted

According to our source, YouTube HD uploads will only work over Wi-Fi, as suggested at Apple’s event today. The HD uploading option will be disabled if Wi-Fi is not available. A sample video shown in the screenshots here shows a more than 3:1 increase in the video’s size when it jumps from standard to high resolution.

Finally, a feature previously suggested in beta versions of iOS 4.1—FaceTime calling over e-mail—now appears to at least attempt the call. With two registered devices running iOS 4.1 and logging their e-mail addresses, the feature presumably works without issues.

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Jeremy Horwitz

Jeremy Horwitz was the Editor-in-Chief at iLounge. He has written over 5,000 articles and reviews for the website and is one of the most respected members of the Apple media. Horwitz has been following Apple since the release of the original iPod in 2001. He was one of the first reviewers to receive a pre-release unit of the device, and his review helped put iLounge on the map as a go-to source for Apple news.