Mix: Belkin, Incipio, Scosche, iPhone theft patent

Belkin has announced a slew of new cases for the fifth-generation iPod nano, second- and third-generation iPod touch, and iPod classic. The lineup includes the Grip Vue, Grip Pulse, FastFit, and Hue cases for iPod nano 5G and iPod touch 2G/3G, the Hand Band for iPod nano 5G, the Grip Ergo with Hand Strap, Halo, Cush, and Micra Flex for iPod touch 2G/3G, and the Grip Pulse Duo, Clear, Leather Sleeve with Clip, and Leather Folio for all three models. Belkin’s new line of cases is expected to be available in mid-September and sell for $20 to $30.

Incipio has introduced its new cases for the fifth-generation iPod nano and second- and third-generation iPod touch. The dermaSHOT for iPod nano 5G and iPod touch 2G/3G is made from an anti-static silicone shell, and offers a play-through design with open access to all ports and controls, as well as an included screen protector, cleaning cloth, and video stand. It sells for $15 for the iPod nano 5G and $13 for the iPod touch. Also new is the Incipio EDGE for iPod nano 5G, a high-density translucent polycarbonate case featuring a 50/50 sliding design, open access to all ports and controls, and an included screen protector, cleaning cloth, and video stand. Available in clear or smoke, it sells for $20.

Scosche has debuted its new kickBACK n5 and switchKASE n5 cases for the fifth-generation iPod nano. Both cases feature a hybrid rubber and polycarbonate design, with the kickBACK n5 featuring a clear center front portion and rubber on the sides and back, and the switchKASE n5 offering a mostly rubber front with similar amounts of rubber on the back. Other shared features include a hinged kickstand for watching videos, integrated traction nubs for added grip, and open access to all ports, controls, and the camera. The switchKASE n5 also includes a sport armband for use with the silicone skin. Both the kickBACK n5 and switchKASE n5 are available now and sell for $25 and $30, respectively.

A new Apple patent filing suggests the company is working on a system that would use the iPhone and iPod touch’s accelerometers to detect theft. Titled “Acceleration-Based Theft Detection System for Portable Electronic Devices,” the patent describes a system that would detect rapid movement and analyze it to determine whether or not it represented a possible theft. If so, the system could initiate an alarm, and would display

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