Report links original iPad to nickel allergies

Updated

A new report in Pediatrics investigates an increase in nickel allergies that may be linked to the iPad, the Washington Post reports. The article cites the specific case of an 11-year-old boy with a rash. His skin tested positive for nickel, which doctors traced back to a 2010-vintage iPad “he had used with increasing frequency the past six months.” After using a case, his rash “significantly improved.”

Very little has been said previously about nickel as an iPad enclosure material; research suggests that it may have been used in aluminum alloys for some Apple products, including certain MacBooks and iPads, or may have made contact with otherwise aluminum devices during the manufacturing process. Symptoms of a nickel allergy may include a rash, skin bumps, itching, redness in skin color, dry patches of skin, or blisters and draining fluid in some severe cases, according to the Mayo Clinic. Apple had no comment.

It’s unclear at this time how widespread this problem is, but we recommend using a full-coverage case on an iPad — especially on iPads used by children. See our iPad case reviews for comprehensive details about what’s on the market.

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Phil Dzikiy

Phil Dzikiy was the Editor-in-Cheif at iLounge. He mostly edited and oversaw all site editorial content, managed staff and freelancers, made the final call on product review grades and awards, and led online coverage of all Apple events and live coverage of the International CES in 2015.